Monthly Archives: October 2012

Friday, 31 October 1862

Very dull & dark ― not wet.

Bright Smith the same. Called on Mr. Clarke; Most vexatiously ― he has let his 2 floors ― (for 200£ a year) to this old Mrs. Maitland for 7. Or 14 years. ― So I have no chance. ― Went into the City ― & got £88.//.6 ― from dear Anns 1950 ― Consols― & my own 1100. ―

But it was too late to put this into the 3pr. Cents. So I called on Routledge’s, who were out ― a bore. back by 3. ―― It is a nuisance that they have not paid me the 200£. ―

After 4.30 ― Mrs. Robinson & Miss Louis came, ― very pleasant ― & staid till nearly 5. The went, & came ― Mrs. Clive & Edwd. Who were delighted at the paintings.

Τότε ἐπερπατησα[1] to Digby Wyatt’s, but they were out: & I wrote anote.

Then to W. Nevill’s ― where I dined on cold beef. A son of Jonathan was there with his wife. The Nevill Boys ― W.N.’s sons, are awfully wanting in manner & good conditions[.]


[1] Then I walked (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Thursday, 30 October 1862

Very cold ― & foggy early: finer afterwards.

Breakfast at 7.30. Walked to Haymarket ― cab to Waterloo. At Leatherhead ― cold! ― by 10. (There I saw Harrie Farquhar ― & we had a moan about poor dear G. Clive.) Walked to Ellens.

Long talk with her about plans of house, ― Boswell &c. &c. And at 12.30 wished her good-bye, poor thing.

Walked to Ashtead: ever lovely the trees & glades. Mrs. Howard & Miss Paget, ― good as they are the atmosphere if tiny groovy fashion is always irritation gto me, especially after such plain saness as Ellens. Mrs. H.’s room ― & Miss Paget’s: ― & lunch; a Mr. Lucas there, her solicitor. ― Alack! ― do I not remember how weary I used to be at Levens & Elfrid ― 27 years ago? in the days when Mrs. Cavendish ― “are your servants eating now Mrs. Howard ――?” ―― & others.

Yet Mrs. H. is as fine & beautiful an example of a real absolutely good & kind old English Lady as can be found.

She sent me to the rail at 2.30. “quite a charity to employ these ponies!” ――

London by 4. Stratford Pl.: ― a consultation has been held on poor Bright Smith ― but they say he will recover. Then I walked to Fairbairns ― out: a gt. crowd in the park ― last shilling day of the exhibition.

I, cross & sad: & half resolved to pack & go. Home by 5 or 6 ―: & had some tea.

Bed at 8. My “Aunt Knight” died ― 10 days ago. Aet. 93 ― & some months.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Wednesday, 29 October 1862

X10

Lighter. ― Unwell & did nothing all day.

Peel’s Protegé came. ― Fred. K. Thomas Underhill.

Sate with Smith ― who I cannot think will recover.

Sate to Gush, & told him a bit of my mind about his servants.

Grenfell came at 4 ― & staid till 5. Much talk.

Dined at Clives at 7

G.C. is better ― yet I dread ― not well. ― Edwd. C. is a good lad.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Tuesday, 28 October 1862

Very dark

Much bother’d by this new change of lodgers ― & the Slavy=oppression of the Coopers by Gush. Too dark to work. A lad, with his drawings, called from Archibald Peel. Dickensons fixed in the Beachy Head & the small Philæ. ― Called to see if Mr. Clarkes house were to let ― but unluckily it was let 2 months ago only! ― so there is what I lost by not calling.

At 2 ― called on Mr. Pickersgill: to ask him if he intended to sell his house. ― I thought him much softened from of old. He said he would ˇ[be] 80 year old next month: & shewed me many portraits &c. ― I don’t know what to do ― on the poor Coopers’ account.

Anyhow, τώρα[1] ― i.e. at present, I did nothing.

Grenfell did not come at 4 ― or 3.30. as he said he would.

(Bright Smith, by Dr. Hewitt proposing to bring a Coadjutor, seems to me worse. ―)

I sate some time with him, & at 6, went out. Called on the Hansens. Christian Hansen is as always a good man. Rosina is grown a great girl of 12. “Crissy” is at Brussels. Good Hansen would call up Mrs. H. ― O me

― this she ‘resembles.’ ―――

Tried to dine at Blue Posts ― but it was full. ― Rain ― so I came home, & T. Cooper got me some cold beef. ― (First, I sate with B. Smith.) The Organ below is dreadful καὶ στοχάζομαι νὰ ἀναχωρίζω.[2]


[1] Now, at present (NB).

[2] I am thinking of leaving (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Monday, 27 October 1862

Fine early. rose at 7.

Letters from Lady W. ― very kind. Mrs. Rawson ― enclosing 21£ ― & T.G. Baring ― all nice.

Went at 11 to Maclean’s, & was φotographed twice.

Then, at 12 ― walked to Routledge’s, & it seems, am to be paid £200 ― next or this week. ― Tired.

Sate a bit with Bright Smith, & to Gush.

At 4.30 or 5 ― came J.B. Edwards ― whom I was glad to see. ――

At 7. dined with him at the J.W.S. Club. very pleasantly ― except that there is so much noise. J.B. seemed to me more lively & like himself ― & presently I heard ― Miss L. ― is to be married next week ― to one William Melville. I wish him joy of her! ― It seems, James had, (as I expected ―) began the game again ― & she alternately led him on, or snubbed him, ― At last so distinctly as to make him ask for his letter which she ― !!! ―― has been receiving constantly. This she took no notice of ― so he went on ―when lo! Earl R. writes ― begging him from desisting from attentions &c. ― disagreable to his step daughter! ――― (a kindly letter tho ― & nicely indited.) To which, J. wrote back, he would do so ― if Earl R. would use his influence in getting her to send back his letters &c. In 5 days afterwards all were sent back. ――

And so ― happily it ends. A heartless nasty woman. ― Mannie Drummond “cried” & Mrs. D. ― a dreadful little woman, did all she could to shew they were not in fault, which indeed, no one ever thought they were.

Home by 10.40.

XX9


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Sunday, 26 October 1862

Dull & wet early: fine after 12.

Greek till 12. Sate a bit with poor Bright Smith. Walked to Sir Henry Woolff’s & sate a bit there. ――

Then called on A. Peel: out. At 3 to Mrs. Farquhar’s, out. To Miss Percy ― at home ― & sate some time with her ― a really nice woman. Then on Mrs. Robinson ― & lastly, walked in the Square Gardens with Mrs Clive. Home by 6.15.

(Passing down Park Lane, a cab, turning into Hereford St. stopped ― & Daddy Hunt got out. He was going to call on me: & then to his Mother: & one or two more: being here for some hours ― & going back to Ockham. ― My dead Daddy does not seem to me to fo on happily ― but I do not know. Neither do I blame him.)

At 7.20 ― Adml. Robinson. Mrs. R. very unwell ― & could not dine. Wit Adml. T. I passed a very pleasant hour, ― & upstairs, with both, ― 2 others ― equally so. They are singularly “simpatico” people to me ― & always were so. A vast enjoyment of the beautiful in nature ― a hard self denying application to duty ― a “horror of darkness” & English climate ― & many other points of parallel. ――

At 10.20. came away. Cab home.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Saturday, 25 October 1862

Asthma better. Bright early. Finished the Beacy Head. No letters. Worked hard also at the small Philæ ― & finished it ― also at Olympia, & a small Dead Sea.

Sam Clowes came. (When Henrietta C. was about to marry Mr. Lyle ― (?) the widower of 3 wives &c. ― Mrs. Strange, always gauche ― wrote to congratulare her thus, You are greatly to be admired for your “benevolent undertaking.” Whereat Henrietta was disgusted. S.W.C. also told me of a letter Tidd Pratt had just shewn him ― (T.P. being the head of certain savings banx ―) from a member of a savings bank, who complained of the other members. The writer said, ― “I told them if they went on so, I’d inform Tidd Pratt. But they called out “B――r Tidd Pratt, ― what do we care for him. Tidd Pratt is a b――d fool: & you may go from us & kick his Ass ―” sic ― &c. &c. ――― & all this to Tidd Pratt himself.

At 4.30 walked out. Letters from Mrs. Clive, Mrs. Howard, & Mrs. Farquhar. Looked absurdly, at a house in [Rupile] Square ― & then went to the friendly good Bergmanns’ ― where I staid to dine, & passed a pleasant evening. They are regular good people.

Home by 10.30. Greek till

Finished my 4th book of the Iliad.

Garibaldi is getting weaker.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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