Monthly Archives: January 2011

Thursday, 31 January 1861

Interlaken.

Finer ― & a little colder.

Tarrant called. Worked pretty well from 10 till 4 ― at Interlaken. Mr. Sayer called & sat: ― Invited to dine on Friday ― but I could not go ― so ― as I wished to go once ― καὶ ὅχι πλέον ((But not anymore (NB).)) ― I said ― to day. ―

At 4.30 Walked to Winsor & Newtons’s ((Messrs. Winsors and Newton were suppliers of all kind of materials for artists; they also published a series of handbooks, such as The Art of Etching.)) & ordered 5 blocks of 18 inches by 9½ each, for “the gt. Mount of Olives drawing.” Am I likely to finish it?

Home by 6. at 7 ― the Sayers.

Mr. & Mrs. S. ― Mrs. Shakespear, who did not seem to me to be well: ― & Mr. & Mrs. “Parry Crooke:” Mr. P.C. has not a nice visage. ― The evening however was very much more pleasant than any I ever passed there.

Mrs. Shakespear talked of the Cortazzi &c. ― What dreams! ―

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Wednesday, 30 January 1861

Dull ― damp ― dark.

Worked only till 1 P.M. at the Bethlehem.

Then out. Called on Mrs. Somers Cocks, who was very vaticinative. Then across the Park to Daddy Hunt, who was fortunately alone: ― sate with him till 4: very pleasant.

Then ― call on G. Middleton ― out.

Poi, walked home by Kensington, intending to make other calls ― but durst not cross the dazzly dirty dimmy slippery streets. Home before 6. Θουκυδίδης εὥς τὰς ἐπτὰ. ― ((Thucydides until 7 (NB).))

Cab to J. Edwards’ Club, dining with him.

This youth vexes me at times ― & I can’t see his way clear.

Home by 10.30.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 29 January 1861

Wrote to

It don’t matter when one riz ― for it was pitch dark ― No hope of work ― thick fog ― opposite houses unseen.

So I lit a lamp at breakfast & arranged drawings till 11.30 & at 12 it grew lighter.

Then, ― Dickenson came, & once more the “Cedars” are “before me” also the Damascus & Beirût ― unfinished, but framed & glazed, & the Bethlehem & Interlaken ― ditto. ― How & when are these to be complete ― & ―― which is importanter, ― sold? And the inexorable bill for frames, paid?

Well, ― all the back room is done by 2. ― At 2.30 came “Joinville” “Paris,[”] & “Chartres[”] ― & it is really pleasant to shew them: for not only are they all scrupulous & gentlemanly in consideration & manner, ― but they know the places, appreciate the views, ― & to boot are jovial & light-hearted. ― ˇ[H.R.H.] The Count de Paris, though, looks ill: ― ha is truly a nice fellow. ˇ[H.R.H.] Duc de Chartres ― had had a tooth out. The Uncle, tho’ deaf, is very agreeable & clever. Then “H.R.H.” ― remind me of dear Bob Hornby’s rebuke, & a proper one, to me, when I wrote of the “Cambridges.” “put H.R.H. before the name if you please.”

At 5 I walked to Mr. Morier’s & sate there a little time. The kindly ancient diplomat & his daughter.

Returned to dine on cold beef & beer ―: read Herman Melville, ― & do a little Greek. (Called on poor J. Godley also.)

XX

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Monday, 28 January 1861

Bethlehem

Darkish early ― but a fine day ― & “frightfully warm.”

Worked at the Bethlehem ― ἢ κακως, ἢ καλῶς, δὲν ἐξεύρω. ((Whether good or bad, I do not know (NB).)) ― At 3 resolved to make up the room for visitors, & to wind up by the end of February if possible. ― Went to Foord’s, & ordered the Beirût & Damascus frames, & the Cedars, back here.Walked at ― 4.30, to J. Edwards at his office. ― He is restless & unhinged, & I do not see, after all ― that he is sure to settle & do well. It rather appears to me that he may suddenly fling everything away, & go abroad. Drummond’s ˇ[last] letter, as all I hear from him, ― bespeaks a good & kind hearted man.

Dined at home on cold beef at 6.30. Read H. Melvilles “Marquesas” ((I.e. Herman Melville’s Typee: A Peep at Polynesian Life. During a Four Month’s Residence in a Valley of the Marquesas (1846).)) ― & did some Greek.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Sunday, 27 January 1861

Rose late. ― After breakfast wrote to Windm Hornby ― & to G. Richmond. ― Then looked over Campagna drawings, for Mr. Whitman’s picture. ― Day very warm, & “fine.” Went out at 1.30 ― calling at Crake’s ― & across the Park to the G. Clives. ― Mrs. C. ― Miss C. Charley, & Kathleen ―: all of them natural ― which is a boon. (Met P. Bouverie, & 6,000,000 children: ― also Jameson, με την ματέρα του: ― καὶ ((With his mother ― and (NB).)) Lord Rendlesham.) Went home; & again called on R. Curzon, Lady Farquhar, & J. Uwins: all ἔξω. ((Out (NB).)) Home ― & at 6.30 to Crakes. Mr. & Mrs. C. ― & Mary Anne. Oimè! ―― äi! Θάνατος! ἂχορος, ἂλυρὂς, πλέον ἒργὠ. ― Ἀδοἀρδος Κραῖκς ―― ((Woe! Ah! Death! Without dance or lyre, in every point ― Edward Crakes (NB).)) Came away at 10.15. Cab home ― & it is pleasant to find the cheerful fire here ― yet sad to reflect on the past cold going out of lights!

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 26 January 1861

Thurston Thompson? Photographer? ((Lear might have been looking for information on photographic reproductions of his drawings, as Thurston Thompson is mentioned as taking photographs of the Mulready Drawings “previous to the presentation of these drawings to the National Gallery” in the Journal of the Society of Arts for 9 April 1858, p. 317.))

Fine: ― rose at 7.30. Letters from E. Tennyson, & Windham Hornby & J.B. Edwards ― the last satisfactory.

But my eyes & stomach were ill at ease & I worked [], at the Bethlehem ― the black from the chimney annoying me horridly. So at 2 I cabbed to Foord’s ― & ordered glass for the frames. Returning ― spent the rest of the day in looking at paper &c. &c. &c. They sent, & put the glasses.

At 7 to Martineau’s. Mrs. M. always so kind, pleasing, & lady-like, the 2 Miss M. ― Edward M., & Bob ― a pleasant evening ― burning the Candles at dinner.

Walked back with Bob M. We spoke of Lockyer’s death.

XX

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 25 January 1861

Rose at 7.30. Dull ― dark. ―

Wrote a long letter to J.B.E. διὰ τὴν Κυρίαν Λίζαρ. ((About Mrs. Lizar (NB).)) & a reply to a nice letter from the Comte de Paris.

Ann came at 11 poor dear: she grows sadly aged. ― Sarah S. goes to her tomorrow.

Worked from 10.30 to 3.30 ˇ[or 4] at the Bethlehem.

At 6 Dr. Gray’s ― Mrs. Gray though 75 ― is really the same lively kindly woman as ever: Mrs. Stokes also ― as pleasant. She ― Sophia Gray as was ― has one little girl 10 years old ― Emina Gray ― Mrs. Smith ˇ[only] one boy: as old. There were Mallets & various people ― 11 at dinner.

A young Hungarian ― ([] ―) played wonderfully on the Piano. ― I sang ― but not well.

At 10.30 cab home.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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