Monthly Archives: June 2010

Saturday, 30 June 1860

Finer; ― gray ― & only a shower or two.

Dickenson came & took away the last of those Parnassuses incubi, Lord Clermont’s. ― Mr. Gush & his daughter came also. ― Later W. Nevill junior ― & then Henry Hetcher, who has travelled everywhere, & is (still) a really nice fellow. ― After Willie N. went, came F.L. ― It seems, Dicky B. is not going with him as Sec. J. ― Began to work at the “Dead Sea” ― & then came Major R. & Miss Yates ― & after that Philip Bouverie & his 2 little girls.

Did not go out: but at 7.45 ― cab to Kenneth Macaulays

1860-06-30_dt

Reg. Cholmondeley should have come.

This dinner was pleasant: ― & G.S. Venables extremely kindly & nice ― & far more softened than I could have expected. The anecdotical portion of the dinner was very funny: ― Spedding ever very beautiful=real. ―

Evening also pleasant. ―

V. Spedding & Thompson, & F.L. & I behind, walked on. Midnight. ― I came home allein, μόνος, solo, seul, alone. ― But it don’t vex me now as heretofore. ―

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 29 June 1860

11XXX

Queer mechanical work, ― this journal writing.

At 6 fine ― [but slept]. ((Lear wrote “stepl.”))

At 8 rain. 10 cloudy. 12 dark.

& thence to 5 frightful outpouring rain. J. Gibbs, & Capt. Gibbs came. ― & ― I think, no one else, till Mrs. George Clive & Ansibilla ― who staid a long time 4 to 6. ― & are a comfort, ― being kindly, & reasoning, & well-informed, & well-bred, & feminine, ― besides well-looking. ―

At 6.30 I called on 2 or 3 or 4 places ― but came back at 8 ― & dined on cold beef & beer.

Wet nearly all day. ―

(X12)

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Thursday, 28 June 1860

Dull gray: ― dark: ― pouring rain from 2 to 7 ― storms.

Worked but little, but really got off Farquhar’s, & Bruce’s Parnassuses ― & Miss Yates’s Jánina. ― The many details* of visits one can hardly record at this hour, 11.30 P.M. Ogle is a singular fellow. ― Beauclerk is kindly & pleasant. ―

* Dickenson
R. Bright, Mrs. B. & Nephew
Mary Anne, & Catherine North.
S.W. Clowes.
Willie Nevill.
Charles Wynne.
Ogle ―――
Beauclerk

At 7.45 to H. Farquhars. (Bulfinch in Swiss cottage cage.[)]

1860-06-28_dt

Dinner remarkably good. Wines super good, and plentiful. Objects around pleasant & rememberable.

Mrs. S. very dull ― but I talked a great deal: ― next neighbor, Whitbread, pleasant.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Wednesday, 27 June 1860

Damp ― dark ― raining at times.

Incessant fuss. Carpenter setting up Folio stands.

Mrs. S. Gurney & 2 friends: C. Braham: F. North. ― Foster: ― Dickenson. ―

Worked a little at the last of the Parnassusses. ― & slept.

Whereon came George Middleton ― much talk of Col. Leake: ― & B. Husey Hunt, which was refreshing.

At 7½ to Philip Bouverie’s ― dinner.

P.B.’s dinners are always of the nicest dressed & looking people ― couples ― all, or single. ― There were

Mr. Dudley & Lady ―― Fortescue.
Mr. & Mrs. Watson Taylor
Mr. & Mrs. Somebody Somebody
Capt. Somebody
Miss Seymour.
P. & his ― oh so slow! Wife ― but good.
& Mr. Someone.
12 & E.L. ……

A kind of weariness pervades me after these monotonies: though of good will there is much.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 26 June 1860

Cloudy: not wet.

Rose before 8. ― Worked at a Parnassus. ―

Woolner came. And poor dear Ann: ― & young Willie N. ― Then Mrs. & Alfred Seymour. Ann ― & W.N. lunched. ― Ann went at 4.

Ann seems older to-day than I have seen her, but I hope that is from the close & hot air of the day. Regarding Sarah & Ellen she is clear & well-judging in all she says: ― but she seems to look forward to leaving all more certainly & distinctly. This, I trust, so long as we can keep her happy & quiet, will not be for many many years; ― & her new lodging ― with her old friends Miss Randall, & Miss Peel, seems to me more desirable than any I have known of her late abodes.

At 7.30 to Col. Clowes. Col. C. Miss C. 3 Arkwrights & George C. ―――― A “mixed society” truly.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Monday, 25 June 1860

X10

Wet all day.

Ach. Worked but little; slept much, at one Parnassus. ―

Henry Bruce came & staid some time. Dined at Lady Farquhars.

Harrie F.
Mrs. ―― F.
Dowgr. Lady Wenlock.
Lady W. Russell.
Arthur Russell.
Douglas Kinnaird.
Sir Rob.t Alexander.
Duke of Cleveland
Earl Grey
Countess Grey.
Baron Marochetti
& one or 2 more.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Sunday, 24 June 1860

Gray. No rain: & a shimmering of sun.

All the morning, looked over, & destroyed letters.

At 1.30 called on the Percys ― out, Brights ― where was Ogle. Grenfell, & Chapman, ― seeing R. Cholmondeley & Gibbs: ― Lady James, seeing Sir Walter; ― then home. Poi, Mrs. Leake, out: ― Cockerells, seeing the old gentleman & Fred: ― Miss C. to be Mrs. Benson. Then Mrs. Martineau: ― after all which I returned by 5.30 to Stratford Place.

At 6½ to Lady Bethell’s ― (Sir R. away at Hackwood. ―) Wally there, apparently gentle & gentlemanly. ― I say, apparently for I tremble for his youth. ― And, Gussie, ― always the same, good & real. ― Then came “Baptiste Metaξà ―” & 2 sons ― & it is not possible to say what a disgusting slaverer this man is: how lying, ― false, ― vulgar, ― odious. ― Nothing would be more irritating. ― But the disclosures made by poor Lady B. about Dick, the blackguard, ― were frightful. ― I do not put them down ― but keep them to shudder at. ―

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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