Monthly Archives: September 2013

Wenesday, 30 September 1863

Rose at 6.30. Work little ― before breakfast.

4 letters ― each a subscriber ― lady Grenville, Lady Wilmot Horton, ― A. Heywood, & Lady Fitzwilliam, & all particularly kind writing.

Finished the 13th Lithograph ― (No. 1) ― & worked a good deal at the 14th (No. 3. Virò.) ―

Came Edwd. Wilson, & asked me to dine ― so at 6.30 I went to the Reform Club ― having previously gone to ask after poor Archie Peel.

1863-09-30

Pleasant dinner ― & good in all ways ― Tomato soup, Smelts, ― truffle patters, ― some sort of steak ― & a grouse, & ice pudding ― with sherry ― a bottle of Veuve Cliquôt, ― & one of good claret. Τοῦτο ὀνομάζεται γεῦμα, άληθῶς.[1] ― The Reform Club is gorgeous.

E.W. (who is 49 & a half years old,) starts on the 14th for Liverpool ― & then by the Gt. Britain to Melbourne ―― a voyage of 60 days. ― I would like to go.

Home by 10.40. Bed at 11.

Kind note from Mrs. Prescott.


[1] This is what I call dinner, indeed (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Tuesday, 29 September 1863

Rose at 7. ― Only one Subscriber ― the 73rd[.]

No Hunts, ― no Empsons, ― no Stanleys. Seemeth me I shall make a fiasco after all. ― After breakfast began to work, but violent indigestion & illness prevailed. X.

Then ― about 11 ― Mr. Morier came. 80 ― next February ― he is! ― I see him much aged & infirm ― but he is as clear-headed & full of fun as ever. Talking of an anecdote ― said to be from him, ― in Gronow’s Reminiscences[1] ― (& which he corrected,) we laughed at that of the Duchess de Pompadour’s gold Podechambre. But said Mr. Morier ― the fact of its being used as a Soup Tureen is only similar to what I myself saw at ― (some place in Turkey) ― where a Pasha had had English presents ― among others, a Bidet ― in which a roast Pig was served up!

After he left ― I drew ― but badly ― till 6. At this blessed 13th Lithograph.

Δὲν ὑπῆγα τὶποτες.[2]

Dined on cold beef & rice. ― ―

The sadness & solitariness of this life is becoming laughable.

Read Leigh Hunts Αὐτοβιογραφία.


[1] Rminiscences of Captain Grownow, Formerly of the Grenadier Guards, and M.P. for Stafford. London: Smith, Elder and Co, 1862.

[2] “Did not go nothing” presumably intending “anywhere” (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Monday, 28 September 1863

Rose at 6. ― Breakfast at 7. Gloomy morning.

Essex certainly has no liveliness of aspect. Rail at Brentwood & to town. Pouring rain. Home by 10. Drew, but very interruptedly at No. 1 ― the 13th Lithograph. Lady Westbury sent a note ― asking me to [Anstead], & I answered, but afterwards found I had engaged to go on a date I dated wrongly ― so I have to go up ―by way of remedy & penance to Upper Hyde Park Gardens.

Then came Jamie Hornby, ―― dear Jambo. Ἐνθημοῦμαι τῶν ἡμέρων παρασμένων εἰς Νῶζλι.[1]

Alas! ― he could only stay half an hour. ―

These things point to another world ― methinks ― truly: ― for why the recall of such long past pain if for no good.

At Hyde Park Gardens ― found another note from the Lord C. ― & rushed to go on Saturday ― putting off the Prescotts. ― Walked on to Daddy Hunt ― & found him. After a walk, I staid to dine with him at 7. ― Little Teddy his nephew there. ― Staid till 9.40, ― most pleasantly. Cab home.

Letter from Ellen, enclosing one from Fredk. ―

Wrote to Mrs. Prescott.


[1] “I am reminded of days past at Nozli” (NB), Nozli being “a town in Asiatic Turkey, in the province of Natolia” according to The New Universal Gazeteer; or Geographical Dictionary. London: G.G. and J. Robinson, 1798. However Marian’s comment below is no doubt right and Νῶζλι is a transliteration of Knowsley.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Sunday, 27 September 1863

Rose at 8 ― having slept only the last part of the night. Breakfast ― cheerfullish. Talk with C.F.L. ἔπειτα, & showed the 11 Lithographs.

Lady W. came down at 1 ― & ditto repeated. She ― very pleasant as always.

Lunch. Agreable. At 2.40 ―walk with C.F. to Navestock church. Bore ― service ― Xtening & churching ― & a 25 minutes stupid sermon. Certainly ― the forms of religion are stupid & sad ἐις τὴν πατρίδαμου.[1] Walked back by 5: & now he is going out with her.

So far ― the day has gone by ― less wearily than I had augured. Would I could get early to town tomorrow ― but that is not possible, I fear. The day is chilly & gloomy ― if it were bright there would be beauty in these Essex meadows.

(Maria Miss Ailesby has been staying with them of late ― furious & miserable at Lord W.’s marriage with Miss S. To the last she had hoped to marry him herself! ―)

From 6 to 7.30. sate quietly with C.F. reading & talking. ―

1863-09-27

Tea & singing till 10. ― & all very pleasant. Prayers ― read by C.F. ― Then, mostly to bed: I with C.F. talking till 11. ― So: ― εἶναι περισοττέρας εὐχαριστήσεις παρά ηνόμιζα, εἰς ταύτας δύο ἡμέρας.[2]

 


[1] In my country (NB).

[2] There are more pleasures than I thought in these two days (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Saturday, 26 September 1863

Rose ― 6.30 ― worked till 8. ―

Wrote notes ― after breakfast & then worked at No. 1 ― (13th Lithograph) till 2.30. Dressed ― & at 3.30 ―left for Shoreditch Station. C. Braham ― Brentwood by 5.20. Drive to Dudbrook ― cold! Oh! ――

C.F. out walking. My Lady unwell. Ward Braham ― who is amusing ― & imitates the 3 brothers Harcourt θαυμαστικὸς.[1] ― Dressed 7.30. C.F. came in. A talk of storx & the Islands.

Dinner.

1863-09-26

Mrs. H. ― (προτήφηρον[2] lady W.’s Governess ―) bu[r]st out contemptuously as to H. Hunts Temple ― “I have an instinct: the Doctors’ faces were all the same ― & the Virgins face wa altogether miserable.”

Later they all fred to whist upstairs, ― & I, & C.F. sate talking till 10.30.

ὃλα χαλασμένα ― κόσμος ― ἒλπις ― ἡμέραι, ἂνθρωποι.[3]


[1] Wonderfully (NB).

[2] Nina is baffled by this word and says: “maybe [Lear] was going for ‘previously.’”

[3] Everything is rotten ― the world ― hope ― the days, the people (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Friday, 25 September 1863

Fine ― rose 6.30. Touched proofs with white.

Only 3 new subscribers by Post ― 54 being as yet the highest number ― which won’t pay.

Letter from G. Cocali ― Καρραλάμπος has been ill again ― al solito, Spiro gone to Athens.

Letter from F.L. ― who is in a fuss about this blessed Storx Judge affair: he sends ˇ[copy of] a letter he has written to the Duke. Wrote to him.

Finished the 12th Lithograph ― No. 2 ― S. Salvador, & began the 13th ― No. 1. the Ascension view, which I worked at till 5.30. Then dressed & went to the Digby Wyatts ― & by great fun, found them at home. What a delight those people are!

1863-09-25

Music ― dogs ― birds ― architecture, ― drawing ― conversation of all intelligence, & Digby walked with me to Goodge St.

Home by 11.30.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Thursday, 24 September 1863

Rose at 6.30. but there is no pleasure in so doing. Wet all day.

At breakfast ― saw that dear old Mr. Cockerell was to be buried at St. Paul’s ― & I knew that it would please Fred, & Mrs. C. if I went there. So I dressed, & went in a cab ― & got a ticket from Penrose. (What horrible statues are there in this place!!) By degrees, numbers came: ― of whom, Clarke, Ferguson & Digby Wyatt were of those I knew. The procession & ceremony are ― to Londoners ― imposing: but to me ― not so: the simple word-reading is far more so. The long chanting, & formal conventional intoning & minors are a bore. The Vault portion of the detail was more impressive ― but even then, “dust to dust” &c. sung, is to me nil. Dean M. ― (greatly altered since I used to meet him at Miss Duckworth’s ― now nearly double, ―― yet with every energy of mind apparent,) read beautifully. ―

I came away solo ― & a cab took me home by 1.45. ―

I find, Oldham the Lodger below is going: ― a bore. I should be gald of those rooms ― if I could properly afford them.

Worked from 2 to 5. Then walked to 13. Chester Terrace, to leave a card on the poor sad Cockerells ― for old as he was, & blank as his later life has been, he was ― so to speak, ― a friend in his own family: & that blank is not filled again.

Returned to dine at 7. ― il solito[1] κρύον κρέας προβάτου.[2]

 


[1] The usual.

[2] Cold lamb meat (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Wednesday, 23 September 1863

Showery, at times all though.

ἀλλὰ δὲν πειράζει.[1]

Rose at 6.30. ―

At 8 ― several letters & subscribers. Particularly nice letters from Lady Shelley, Mrs. G. Clive, & Lady Goldsmid.

Finished 11th Lithograph ― (no. 8 Lefchimo.) & began 12th Lithograph. (No. 2. Salvador.)

Dear good old Mr. Ashton came ― to my surprise ― he is past 75. A dream it seems, that sending me to the rail so many years ago ―with J. Winstanley, then a young man, now a grandfather.

A good deal of quiet talk ― but it does not do to talk much with him.

At 5.30 ― walked to Lord Westbury’s. ―

Dined at 7 ― μοναχως.

Ὁ Γεώργιος, διατί δἐν γράφει;[2]

wrote, & made “circular notes” till 10. ―――

 


[1] But it doesn’t matter (NB)

[2] Why hasn’t Giorgio written? (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Tuesday, 22 September 1863

Showery ― all day. light & dark.

Worked an hour before breakfast ― on the 11th Lithograph ― No. 8.

Sir F.H. Goldsmid called ― & later Wade-Browne. Did not go out.

At 7. Daddy Hunt dined with me & went at 10.15.

Talking of Wolley’s fire[1] ― Daddy H. says he is sure that he burned the house himself, & that one of Egg’s servants could have given this evidence ― that (for they were all “assisting” at the fiery functions,) she also found the clothes [named] by another evidence, & thinking it strange ― there being already rumours of the Arson ― took them up ― & found them all mashed & belonging to Mr. Wolley. H. says, his character was always so very bad he never would become acquainted with him, & that Egg used to say the interior of the house was never worth much.

Where, what, which is Truth &
who ― or “wherefore”?[2]

Daddy is very shrewd ― but alquanto παράδοξος.[3]

 


[1] Lear evidently discussed the outcome of the trial for the Campden House fire. Mr. Wolley, the owner, was accused by a group of insurance compamies of setting the house on fire. Since they refused to pay for the damages, he sued and won the cause, which was settled in September 1863. See “The Burning of Campden House.” Illustrated London News, 5 September 1863, p. 234; The Annual Register; A Review of Public Events at Home and Abroad, for the Year 1863. London: Rivingtons, 1864, pp. 224-264.

[2] Ten years later, this line will be transformed into: “Who, or why, or which, or what, Is the Akond of SWAT?”

[3] “Paradoxical,” but also “admirable” (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Monday, 21 September 1863

A sort of showery day ― ἀλλὰ ποῖος ἐξεύρει[1] ― I never look out of window if possible.

Worked at the 10th Drawing (being also No. 10 ―) but could not finish it till 3.30 ― for Regld. Cholomondely came, & I couldn’t bear not to see him, ― for he is not only a gentleman by caste ― but by mind & taste ― & I like him: only, as a fault he was screwy sometimes as to half-pence. Ma chi cambia la natura sua? ― o, veramente, ― chi può cambiarla.[2]

Later, came dear old S.W. Clowes ― it does me good to see him so happy. Yet I know he feels the matter most deeply ― for never  a man loved woman more than he did Sophy C. ― & faithfulness like his is not moved ― so to speak ― to another object, without deep feeling ˇ[& moreover not without what it moves to ― being good also.] His is a good nature & heart: but from all I can fancy ― from what he says, & from her Photograph ― I believe she will fill up the void space. ― I could however only see S.W.C. for 3 minutes, for I was packing the 10th drawing.

Τότε, ἤρχισα[3] the 11th drawing ― to wit. No. 8 ― Lefchimo: & I worked till 6.15. ― when it grows dark: then dined alone, & ἔπειτα, wrote 20 more addresses, & filled them with Circulars for tomorrow’s post.

 


[1] But who knows (NB).

[2] But who changes his nature? ― or, actually ― who can change it.

[3] Then I started (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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