Monthly Archives: January 2016

Sunday, 20 November 1864

Very lovely quiet bright morning. Walked a bit before breakfast on the promenade: ― reading Homer. ― Now the “spirit of the East” ― ancient & modern ― fades from me ― being here at the western vulgar limit: ― but query, does that make more or less happiness? Breakfast ― & no post, reason unknown. ― Wrote to Mrs. Clive, Mrs. G. Scrivens, W.H. Hunt, & T.G. Baring. At 1 ― called on the Deakins, & lunched with them & Mr. Lyon ― a kindly pleasant senior. At 3, went to Church ― a dreadful bore, Sermon on Woman in Samaria ― a new subject, 40 minutes long: ― irritation. Coming out ― various Reillys seized me, & I went with them to see their mother: heaps of people there, wholly a bore. Called on Mrs. Smith Barry ― out. Home, & at 5.30 to table d’hôte at Mediteranee ― Mrs. Saltmarshe unwell: queer set of English. Sate next a little man, who turned out to be Greek.

Came home by 7.30. Wrote a little ― & bed early: ― διότι,[1] ― I have no good lamps ― & can’t work.


[1] Because.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1864, Diary Entry

Saturday, 19 November 1864

Rain all night ― but day bright & lovely all through.

Little I see of the front & blue sea ― as I work at the back, but however I come to look at it it is certainly very delightful.

Rose at 7 ― & worked from 7.45 to 8.30.

Breakfast.

At 9.30, worked again, 2nd process ― till 3.30. ―

At 4 walked to Lady Duncan’s, & sate with her & poor Anna ― both unwell: ―

Home by 6 ― & dined. I cannot well pen out, as I have no table, nor lamps.

I began fires yesterday ― in the evening: but do not want them by day yet.

Heard George read: he has improved a good deal.

8th day of 240 Tyrants.
Got through 16 2nd process ― in all, 56[.]


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1864, Diary Entry

Friday, 18 November 1864

A deep-red bright Sunrise ― soon clouding, cloudy, & gleamy all the early part of the day ― cloudier after 12 ― & rain at 4 ― pouring rain from 5: ― at 9 ― there seems less.

Woke ― “indigestible.” X

Yet worked hard at the drawings till 4.30.

Letters from
Cecil Lane in an Envellope [sic] of T. Cooper’s
Daddy Hunt ――
Phillipps of the 6th

All these bringing back many memories.

From 5 ― my hours were sad, till I instituted a fire.

Dinner at 6.15 & afterwards, penned out till 9.15.

G. staved off reading ― & went to bed.

Ditto his master at 9.30.

―――――

7th day od 240 Tyrants
Got through 17 of 2nd process ― 40 in all.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

1 Comment

Filed under 1864, Diary Entry

Thursday, 17 November 1864

Perfectly bright & beautiful, but colder.

Rose before 7, & worked an hour nearly before breakfast. The Daily Telegraph ― having missed yesterday, Wednesday representing Sunday here, quâ posting, ― comes again.

At 3 I was so cold & miserable, I gave it up, & walked out, (meeting Dr. Deakin & Mr. Lyon ― whom I should not have known.[)] ―

A long walk to Villa Franca ―: pretty nook of town & harbour. ― Walked back by 6.15.

Dinner, ― always very nice. Afterwards, penned out, & heard George read ― till 10.

―――――

6th day of 240 Tyrants ― (the Tyrants here being 155.)
2nd process ― got through 13-23 in all[.]


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1864, Diary Entry

Wednesday, 16 November 1864

X4

Perfectly lovely ― fresh bright day ― but not cold ―― all through.

Worked from 9 to 4 ― (& half an hour before breakfast) ― quite hard.

No post today.

Finished Trevelyan’s “Competition Wallah.” At 4 ― walked “into the town” ― (posting a letter for Mrs. Prescott,) ― & up the hill nearly to Villa Franche [sic]. ―

Returned at 6.30 ― & dined at 7. Heard G. read afterwards ― & penned out (!!!!!) a whole drawing ― (Ponte Maddalena ―) tho’ with a poor & trying light.

Bed at 10.

―――――

5th day of 240 Tyrants ― ochred the remaining 73 ― & began to go over these last a second time.
Got through 10 ― 2nd process.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1864, Diary Entry

Tuesday, 15 November 1864

Stormy cloudy early ― but quite lovely after 11 ― all day ― breezy, but not the least cold. No fires yet, & open windows.

From 9 to 3.30 worked very hard ―: the system of doing many drawings at once keeps a man alive anyhow.

At 4 ― walked out ―― bright & very blowy: ― up horrid lanes to Lady Duncan’s ― I fear she & Anna lead a dreary hard life.

Back by 6.30 & dined. Ἔπειτα[1] ― wrote to Mrs. Prescott. G. has put on a blue shade to the lamp.

At 9.30 ― bed.

―――――

4th day of 240 drawings. 80 ― ˇ[blue, pink &] ochred. ― the 2nd 73 ― pink & blued.


[1] Then.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1864, Diary Entry

Monday, 14 November 1864

Monday 14 November

Changed weather: rain nearly all day, & very stormy ― waves high. But I got a walk from 5 to 6. It takes 20 minutes to go easily from end to end of the whole Promenade.

Rose at 7 ― having slept well. After breakfast, went over weekly accounts with G., as well as those of his journey here: ― we made “both ends meet[”] all but 1½ francs, wh. we totted to cigars.

Thenceforth I worked frightfully all day ― having, in all ― rubbed off pencil of first 80 drawings ――
slightly outlined second 80 ―
& put in slightly the blues & pinks of the first 80.

It does seem absurd that 160 drawings should go through one’s hands in one day: ― & it remains to be seen what will come of it.

At 4.30 I shut up. (G. was taking in the wood for the winter.) ― I walked along the promenade ― which act is very like one’s old life at St. Leaonard’s.

At 6 ― G. gave me a good dinner of macaroni, mutton, & baked pears. ― all good. But he has a horrid cold, & I must change his room. ―

Ἐως ἐδῶ, ὅλα καλὰ.[1] ―

It is 8 now ― but the noise of the sea is unpleasant. very.

Wrote to F.L.

―――――

3rd day of 240 Tyrants. 153 outlined.
80 ― blue & pink.


[1] So far, so good.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1864, Diary Entry

Sunday, 13 November 1864

Perfectly bright & lovely all day: full moon glorious.

Rose at 7. ― & ― breakfast included, wrote till 10, to C.F.

Went to church, ― & saw Jacob Omnium the very first man, ― he is here for the winter. Lady Vaux & others ― Service a bore ― foolish sermon, & collection afterwards.

Came home, & called then on the Strangfords’ ― but found them all packed & going off: ― sate with them till the ‘Bus’ came & went to the Gare ― & saw them off. Really the Beaufort is a wonderful little woman. ―― Returned, ― & walked & dawdled & dressed till 5 ― or 5.30. Then, dined at the Mediteranee [sic], sitting next Mrs. Saltmarshe, & opposite Lord & Lady Carbery, wh. he is deaf & dumb. Not an unpleasant evening. Home before 8, ― & found G. reading: but I want to make his room more comfortable if I can.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1864, Diary Entry

Saturday, 12 November 1864

Bad night’s rest. ― Today has been, first bright & sunny, ― then cloudy gray ― & so to the end, calm: ― & no need of fires.

Ἐγῶ, ὅμως,[1] ― did not go out till 5: but worked hard at just coloring the pencil outlines I made yesterday of the 240 Tyrants. My! ― how hard I did work! ― But I became depressed & worried towards afternoon. ― There were letters from Fanny Coombe, & Cromek, & T. Cooper. ― And at 4.30, came Lord Strangford, whom, had I been at leisure, I should have been glad to see.

At 5 I set out ― & tried to find the Cortazzi ― which after a while I did. Both are altered ― Helena the most: ― poor things.

Returned & dined, ― G. making one quite comfortable, & settling himself to read afterwards as regularly as possible. A man & of good conditions.

But I myself cannot work much, for I have no good lamps. ―

Very quiet place this ― & with an extra table or two, & lamps, ― perfect. Lady S. asked me to go out to their Hotel ― μὰ τοῦτο εἶναι ἀδύνατον.[2]

Wrote for 2 Pillischer Lamps today.

Reading, the Competition Wallah with gt. delight.[3]

―――――

2nd day of 240 Tyrants.


[1] I, however (NB).

[2] But that is not possible (NB).

[3] George O. Trevelyan’s The Competition Wallah. London and Cambridge: Macmillan and Co., 1864. The book collected a series of letters Trevelyan had contributed to Macmillan’s Magazine during his stay in India as a civil servant.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

2 Comments

Filed under 1864, Diary Entry

Friday, 11 November 1864

The night was stormy=noisy early, ― but I slept very well ― all things considered.

Rose at 7. At 8., G. had breakfast, as neatly & perfectly as at any time these 10 years. ―

I set to work, furiously, afterwards; ― & from 9 to 2 ― arranged, & slightly blocked out, ^[in pencil][,] no less than 4 sets of drawings ― of 40 each. Absurd as this seems ― it is true: & it was no little brain work from a head like mine, to select 160 out of a multitude of views, & to determine their position &c. It makes me laugh to think of it: ― tho’ it was no laughing work.

After 2 ― I went to Avigdor’s bank, & changed 3 Twenty pound notes of Drummond’s ― getting 1509 francs. All the morning, whilst I was so busy ― it had rained a mizzly little, & at times later, ― but the air was warm & pleasant. Wrote to Lady Strangford, who wrote to me, asking me to send a Railway bill. ― Called on Mrs. Smith Barry ― & Mrs. Saltmarshe: & later, on Dr. Deakin. Met Mrs. Hankey ― προτήτερον,[1] Webb. So, it came to be 5. ― or 5.30 ― & I returned.

George had a good dinner of Soup, & lamb & “fazoï[”]:[2] & much it was good.

At 8 ― I set to work ruling lines round the “to be” drawings ― & finished 60.

Meanwhile G. sits down to his reading as if it were 10 years ago. ― Singularly even, & simple, & good man you are o Suliot.

Meanwhile, there is all to thank God for, & nothing to complain of. ―

―――――――

First day of 240 Tyrants.

(X3)


[1] Earlier (NB).

[2] “Beans” in several Italian dialects.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1864, Diary Entry