Monthly Archives: May 2011

Friday, 31 May – Saturday, 1 June 1861

Macon, about 4½  A.M. buffet & wash.

On to Culoz ― 7. ― St. Jean Maurienne 12¼.

Long packing of Diligence. Day cloudy. ― Got 2 places in Coupe, joining W. Bower Forwood, me. ― drive by the great angry river up the valley to S. Michel ― & by the vast Fortress to Modane, & at 8.30 to Lanslebourg where buffet. Colder, 13 miles & 2 horses drag us up. At the top 4 horses.

[A line separates what follows indicating that it is referred to the following day, the entry continuing without interruption on the next page.]

To descend, two only ― nervous work. Got no sleep ― bandage troublesome. At Susa by 2. ― Trunx not opened, as I showed Cavour’s letter. ― Café. ― Rail ― asleep ― to Turin by 4.30. Drove

[1 June]

to 6 Hotels all full, & was about to give it up ― when the Tre Corone took us in: & later we got a large double bedded room. At 6.30 ― after washing ― ˇ[we] took a carriage to La Superga ―― vastly magnificent view & returned ― going also to the Cappuccini, at 12. Then I, solo, called on Lt. James Hudson, who is very prepossessing, & agreeable, & gave 2 letters, Spence, & Lever, ― very kindly. Came home & had a Lemonade, & then slept till 4 or 5. Gt. thunder storm, & pouring rain. Dinner at 5. Later, I & Forwood walked about, & after sunset, to the Cappuccini once more. Ices at 9 ― & bed. ――― Both I & Forwood have resolved to stay here ― as neither he nor I can hope to be better off at Milan or Genoa; & the fête is not a common one: & we two agree thoroughly together: all good reasons for staying. ―

This lad is engaged to Miss Moss ― whose portrait he has shown me: it is very nice, & not unlike Gussie Bethell. Also he says his prayers, & is altogether a good specimen of Marchant Prince.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under 1861, Diary Entry

Thursday, 30 May 1861

Gray cloudy, warm.

Morning at Modern Exhibition: Lanoues ((I can’t find any information on this landscape painter, but in Maxime du Camp, Le Salon de 1861, Paris: Librairie nouvelle, 1861, p. 158 one can read: “M. Lanoue a envoyé neuf toiles qui toutes se distinguent par des efforts consciencieux: sa Forêt de pins du Gombo est de grande tourure, pleine d’air et conçue dans un système de coloration habile qui a permis au peintre d’avoisiner sans crudité des verts et des bleus.”)) & other works &c.

Called on Pantaleone, who afterwards called on me.

Lacäita also, who has just come here, so I went & saw old Lady Carmichael ― who ― sad life ― is taking the little boy southward.

Dined at 4. At the Louvre, (after calling at Lady C.’s ―) by 6, & off to Rail.

Place to Turin. Got good place, opposite [was] a pleasant young Liverpool merchant, who knew Ashtons, Edwards, everybody. ― We talked a good deal ― & the night ˇ[was] soon past.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

1 Comment

Filed under 1861, Diary Entry

Wednesday, 29 May 1861

Gray ― cold early: fine ― after 1 or 2 P.M.

Awful cold mist. Went early from the Hotel, & placing cloax in the Railway carriage, walked about Calais. Off at 12. In a good deal of pain from the strain ― & a bad headache & tired, & finally resolved not to go on tonight by the Maçon train, as that involved another day’s travel.

Paris at 6 ― good train. Immense courtesy of Douane officials: nothing touched, though opened. Hotel Louvre. Dined at 7.30. Walked a little. Bed at 9.30.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1861, Diary Entry

Tuesday, 28 May 1861

Cold, & high wind, N.E.

Somehow there is a kind mockery  about ˇ[the Pavilion Hotel of] Folkestone: it is neither English nor French. He curseth him who comes & him who goes. My trunk did not come & I had to go to the Goods & Junction station, & learned that it ˇ[had] gone in a Van, “all over the place,” & might be delivered in the “evening” ― wh. seeing it was sent off on Saturday ― is proper & pleasant! Insomma, ((In conclusion.)) the boat went off ― & no trunk. Not a little rage: & at 1, when it did come, I set off at once to Dover, ― the only consolation being that the sea was awfully rough. At the Lord Warden Hotel: bitter cold rain & high wind! ―so I went up the “Shaft” & saw old Major Daniel, who, except being older & thinner, is the same kndly gentlemanly old man as in Corfu. He spoke very kindly of J. Edwards. ― At 4 I came back & was about to dine, ― when talking with a man I did not know ― (Dorien Magens) lo! Miss Laura Money & Miss Cyfritt!!! ― With them therefrom I sate a while, & upstairs ― & finally resolved to go ― the wind having calmed down. So, on board at 10. Great crowd. ― Sydney man & little boy, Billy. Broker & others. ― I sate on deck, & kept up by hard effort for an hour ― then was awfully sick & ill, the sickness straining the abdomen afresh. So when we reached Calais after 2 hours frightful torment, I was too ill to go on, & was glad to totter to a Hotel (Meurice,) & fall on a bed with my clothes on.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1861, Diary Entry

Monday, 27 May 1861

Very fine & warm. At 11 (having written 10 more letters,) left the good H. Hunts, & came to the Hastings train. (I am to write to John Senior before I go.) Railroad very shaking, & 2 darling little children, ˇ[who with a nurse] were in the carriage, were, not frightened, but  half ill. So I took the boy ― 4 years old, on my knee, & the girl in my arms, & told them my long name & all kinds of nonsense ― till they forgot the shaking bother. At last, after telling them my long name “4 or 5 times, one said, “My name is Robt. George Winsor Clive.” & the other, ― “& my name is Mary Agnes W. Clive.” ― & they were really Robt. Clive’s children!! ― Whereon much talk with the nurse ― they were going to Scotney. I never saw 2 sweeter & more intelligent children than those 2: & I longed to keep them both. At Hastings, bubble busting. And I to the G. Scrivens. The W.S. also there. Great amount of talk, & most pleasant visit. G.S. went with me to the 5.15 train. 6.3 at Ashford. 7.5 at Φώξτον: ― “changed” & supped.

But O! the dreary terror of this day! so unlike all other England leavings ―― no dear Ann!

Cold bitter wind, & rain.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1861, Diary Entry

Sunday, 26 May 1861

Fine ― middling warm.

Spoke about the “Will” to Bern: who is always good & kind, &, fussed & filled up as he is every hour, has not thought of winding up all affairs. However, he promises to do all next week, & then John Senior is to be my future “legal adviser.” ― While they went to Ch: ― I wrote 2 letters.

After lunch, the Garden: & at 2.30 ― a walk on the downs with B.H.H. sunny & pleasant; sitting lying ˇ[down], talking. Mrs. H.H. & Ellen [Costa] met us on the hill.

A funny shop girl, that. Dinner & evening pleasant till a point. You play ― & find they are all sleeping or sleepy ― reading ― a crackling newspaper. So best, so bed. Packed till late.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1861, Diary Entry

Saturday, 25 May 1861

Fine. Drew 75£ from Drummonds, & gave cheques for

11.15.0
15..0.0

Rose early. Packed. Cab to Drummond’s & various places. Dalziell called. Took leave of poor Beadon.

At 1. To L. Bridge ― & by 2 off to Lewes ― there by 4.

Pleasant evening ― but I wish the “Wills” affairs were settled: & somewhat I fuss & fret because they are not.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1861, Diary Entry