Monthly Archives: June 2009

Thursday, 30 June 1859

Slept better: yet would not rise before 8. No letters. ―

Noise of front room distracting. ― Despair.

Wrote several letters. ―  Thurston Thompson the photographer came: ― afterwards C. Wynne. ―

Could not apply to work: London kills all my energy, & confuses me wholly. ―

At 3 went to Zoological Gardens. ― (Thompson, whom I heard was dead, is yet living.) ― At 6 called at the older Gibbs’s, & waited ― but only saw him as I was going away at 6½. ―

At 7½ I walked across the Park ― & at 8 was at T. Baring’s.

There were Mrs. B. ― looking unwell ― alas! how silly! ― & Maltby ― (afterwards I found him to be a friend of Tom Lushington, & he had been lately at P.H. ―) ― Sir G. Grey ― one of the most agreeable of men ever. ― Lord John Hay. ― & Layard.

A very pleasant dinner in all ways. ―

After all went ― Baring & I smoked & sate till late: ― he is thoroughly kind & good: & always ― it seems to me, improving & improved.

Walked home: ― nearly 1. ―

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[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Wednesday, 29 June 1859

Alas! Alas! ―

Yet I rose at 8. Wretched days indeed! ― Letter from good Mrs. Howard. ― Absolutely arranged to work ―.

At 11 dear Ann came ― poor dear: she is never well in hot weather. She staid to lunch: & I read, Sarah’s, Mary’s, & F. last letters.

T. Baring came: always good & friendly. I completed the 2 Husey Hunt pictures: ― & at 3 went out. Calls on Mrs. Godley, Miss DennettMrs. Wynne, M. Milnes, Mr. Woodhouse, ― Mrs. PercyLord Clermont, Col. Clowes. S.W.C. & Gambier Parry: & saw Hibberts & (Trotman.) Mrs. H. ――
Omnibus to Mr. Bell’s ― by 5. ― We dined, he, J. Salton & I ― at 6½. Pleasant evening. Home in buss by 11.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 28 June 1859

Were there ever more truly dreadful days than these? Except that there is perhaps a pale light, an experience of the past, which deters & postpones despair. Yet at times, how well pleased could I be to have the “judgement” now ―― fearing I may meet it less well if later. ―

Dull, thick, gray day. ― Letters from T.G. Baring, & Ann. ― Called at Crakes ― & went to 2 or 3 houses ― for lodgings. Then to [C. de H.s], for some time. To other houses ― all useless. Gambier  Parry’s: ― cum multis aliis. ((“With many others.”)) ― A. Seymour, B. Redclyffe. ( At 8½ H. Farquhar called ― asking me to dine.) ― Next to the “Hogarth’s”: ― & then in a cart, to 3 Red Lion Square. R. Martineau out. Rain. Bus to Mr. Bell’s. ― He, & James Dalton: lunch: pleasant. ― Bus to B. Martineau ―― not as pleasant. Walked thence, enquiring at many houses, ― but finding none to visit, ― more & more rain, & so & so to [U.I.M.] whence I went to Luards’, & Hallidays: & other places ― all in pouring rain.

An hour of disgust at home, when I concluded it would be better to give up all idea of other houses ― & simply to work a very little here, & then go into the country: ― where? ― At 7¾ to Henry Farquhar’s ―:― Large, & very good & wealthy dinner. Hon. Mrs. Woodhouse (who told me of her son’s being here:) ― Mrs. Hanbury ― formerly Webb ―― &c. &c.

[Always rather a bore, not much.]

Lady Farquhar then.

But what [mean] stuff is this to be called life!!!

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[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Monday, 27 June 1859

Fine. ― Letters from Mrs. G. Clive & B.H.H. ― Went at 10 to W.H. Hunt. His picture is more wonderful than ever. ― But then sane, [as] whole character of his work,  & the place, & himself ― made me sad, ― tho’, thank God, not envious, ― & I came away more dead than alive. Walked to the Bethells’ ― out ― Crake’s, out also. Then home ― & took C. pencil to Tessins, ― & then to Mulock ― out also. To Foord’s. ― But the system of chance work or deadly worry seems to me terrible for myself. ― On to Bickers, ― Bp. Winchester, & Lady Waldegrave’s ― where I lunched. ― Mr. H. much more agreeable than []― she the same as ever ―. Calls on S. Westley ― & across park to Victoria Str. & Mr. F. North ― where was Collingwood Smith. ― Then to Lady Young’s ― out ― Lady Grey, ― Baring, ― Farquhar ― (Clive,) Lord Wenlock ― all ditto. ― Thence, across Park ― Home. Wrote note, & out to Gush, Beadon, Wynnes, ― & to Newman St. to see some Studios. No. 23 I think of taking. In 74 was Stevens ― of Rome. Thence to Wyatt’s ― & after that home to dress. At 7½ went to Brunwich Hotel ― where were Col. Clowes, Miss C., Mr. Mrs. & Miss Arkwright, & latterly S.W.C. ― It is difficult to me to keep up convers[e] with such ― yet am I not wrong in finding it difficult?

Coming out ―― pouring rain! ― So I got a cab home. ― A fatiguing day & wholly unsatisfactory. ―

X16

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Sunday, 26 June 1859

Rose late. Thunderstorm, early.

Holman Hunt came at 10 to Breakfast. Great amount of talk.

At 12 he & I walked to Grey Inn’s Lane, & I alone to the Angel ― Bus ― to Hornsey Road, & walked on ― hot & tired ― to Woodberry by 1.45. Only W.N. there.

Talk enough ― about many matters.

At 8 he walked partly home with me. ― & by 10 I got home.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 25 June 1859

Rose early: absolutely clear morning. ― Those blue hills & the wide lawn are delightful. Left at 7 ― & in Dogcart to Brigg by 8. Dr. Marks & his little men. ― Rail to Gainsboro & to Lincoln by 11. ― Wonderful beauty of Lincoln & its site. The garden[-]like farms, ― the hay ― &c. Went up the hill & into the Cathedral: all fine & grand. Left Lincoln at 12.15. & on ― greatly delighted with the view, ― to Boston, & Peterborough by 2. Then, express train, & in town at 4½ (there was Lord Wenlock ― always as good & kind as usual.) ――

& at 16 Upper Seymour St. by 5. ― All my Roman things there ― but it is a sad chaos, & in such a box of a place ―: the noise also distracts me, & I really cannot stay here. ― At 6.30 to the O. & C. Club, where was F.L. He is not changed at all, save by loss of beard. How we talked!

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[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 24 June 1859

Rose very late. 7½ . ― Friend Life may be proper ― but is not good for progress to me.. ― No letters: read & wrote a very little. ― E.C. not well, & she did not come down to lunch. ― ― After that, J.E.C. drove me in the dogcart (with Punch,) to Broughton, an old Church ― & then I waited for a funeral … (little child who came to me.) & then we went on to Sir R. Nelthorp’s park ― where was a very extremely beautiful bit of ground ― heathy & desert ― lined with [ling] & rabbit holes in sandy slopes, ― & a pond, where were many thousand blk[-]headed gulls ―: they come here on March 15. It was a vast beautiful sight. ― Homeward, we drove through “Manby” ― woods ― Lord Yarborough’s ― very beautiful & quiet & so home by 6½. Garden till dinner. Very quiet & pleasant evening. ― & at 11 I took leave of “Pussy” & later of J.E.Cross as good & pleasant a friend a earth holds ― I believe. I have passed 3 most happy days here. John’s stories are capital.

E.C. collects crysalises. A poor lad employed about the gardens, (Lame) she had to scold: ― Lad made no reply, but pulled out of his pocket something ―― “here’s a Chrysalis for you!” ―

At Bath, on his first going ― a heap of children ran out of school & pissed in the street. J.C. tried to stop one ―

“I warnt a peedlin at you!” ― said the little brat.

Some one was sent for to a remote baptism. ― “Which name?” ― said the Curate. “Why, I thowt yed ’ha browt a naam wi’ ye![”] ― said the parent. ― & after that child was christened Matthew, the curate left. ― “Ye man com back! ―” said the breathless parent. “After all, it’s a lass! & ye’ve named ’un Matthew![”] ―

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Thursday, 23 June 1859

Bad night. ― Rose very late. Fine, but windy. The air here is more pleasant to me that that of Wellow, or Wells ― or Littlegreen. ― After breakfast & newspaper, ― read a good bit of the Petra journals to J.E.C. ― Lunch. ― & afterwards, went with him, in Dogcart through Sir R. Sheffield’s Park to Barton, where was Mr. Sheffield, the Rural Dean ―.― Then, we walked by what they call the Cliff ― a range of Down ― [road] sumptuously overlooking the Trent & Ouse, & Humber, finer river scenery it is impossible to see.

1859-06-23

a full[-]fed river ― & other scenes ― very delightful & glorious. Also there were young partridges, νέα ἀρνίθια. We went on to Alkborough, a village, where J. visited a sick clergyman: & then we walked back to Barton ― & drove all the way back again ― by 6½. ― We all 3 walked about till 7. ― Dinner, Roland & Edward Winn: ― & afterwards, ― Mrs. R.W. ― very nice & pleasant. ― It is curious to hear of Woolly, & the Wentworths. Saying a good deal. ― ― Bed at 11.30.

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James H. & a friend went to Denmark. In all the stationary shops “Bog=paper” was written up ― to the great shock of their [sentiments].

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Wednesday, 22 June 1859

Slept wonderfully well. ― Fine ― & grand clouds. ― Rose at 8. After breakfast ― & toddling about ― wrote several letters. ― & then came one from S.W.C. very nice & kind. Then walked with J.C. to the schools ― & to Mr. Winn’s: very nice people apparently. Map of Lincolnshire ― walk in grounds &c. ― Mrs. J.C. gone out for the day. ― J. & I lunch. Afterwards ― 1.30 ― returned to walk. Meadows ― flat ― canal ― river ― flat, & then up the Wolds, which I call Moab mountains. Wonderfully pretty village, ‘Saxby’ in trees &c. View from top. The Humber. Broad distances ―: walk across wolds; pine avenue exquisite green field, & white sheep with trees & villages & plain & vast ruin certainly one of the very grandest river views I know. ―

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Returned to the level, & walked by canal. Canal [Treksk ] boat ― cut thro’ fields. Tumble into ditch of black mud. Home by 6½, having greatly enjoyed the walk. ― J.E.C. is always the same.

The Winns were here at our return. ―

Dined at 7½ ― but John had been called away to a remote christening, so only Pussy & I were there ― but he came in at 8.30. ― Evening short ― we looked over Roberts’ Holy Land. ―

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A: … went to a new living & was not aware that the Squire was waited for. “When the wicked man―” began he ― “ye munna go on ―” rose up & spoke the clerk. ― “he hath na come yet! ―”

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 21 June 1859

Slept ill, woke at sunrise, & beholding the clear sky & red tiles & chimney=pots, ―― thought of Southern places in spite of myself. ―

Rose at 7 ― breakfast at 7½ ― in Hansen’s lower room ―: Mrs. H. very fat: ― little Rose a nice child.

At 8 ― cab ― (which the horse “came to grief” at Tottenham Court road ― & I had to get another,) to King’s Cross. Train at 9.20. ― Very pleasant & quick to Peterborough. ― Thence slower. Boston & Louth Churches, & great beauty of endless plains of cultivation. At Ulceby by 3 ― after much pleasure in the going: & by 4 to Brigg, where a servant & Dogcart met me. Down to Appleby ― most quiet village & picturesque. John & E. Cross ― & their home ― all very nice & [sound] ― & beautiful. Walk with J.C. & afterwards with both. Dinner: a very happy evening ― till late ― say 11.

Any snipes here? ― (Tourist’s query.)
Lashins on ’em, your honor! ― (Irish lad.
Any ducks? ―――――
The lake is paved with ’em!
Any barometers?
I best had ― thirty ―― & then mysteriously ―
“Whiles: at night!”

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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