Monthly Archives: March 2010

Saturday, 31 March 1860

X14

Very fine & warm. ―

Went out & bought Photograffs: & to Macbeans. ― … Maj.r Reynolds came.

Worked at all 3 Parnassi ― wearily though, ― & packed up various matters. ―

Long schools of μικρὰ παιδιὰ που πηγαινον ((Young children attending (GT).)) to a confirmation. At 6, went out, to M. Citorio to enquire of railroads, thinking to go to Frascati tomorrow with G.: ― but one must be there at 6. The Corso is very full of Χωραφόλακοι, ― & French also ― & everything is in a most effervescent state. To the Knights, where was the Duchess, Isabella & Helen ― altogether: ― the Gaetani family are sadly placed now ― so opposed to all the Govt. …

Reports of all sorts are current. Lamoricière, ((The French general who took command of the papal army, which he led in the Italian  campaign against Sardinia in 1860.  On 18 September that year he was severely defeated by the Italian army at Castelfidardo.)) it really seems is at Ancôna. A few weeks must bring various changes. ―

Staid till 7, [και [] να γευματισει μονος]. ((And [] have lunch alone (GT).))

To bed early.

Piano went to day. ― Room nearly empty, but it is no longer cold now.

Crosses X
14

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 30 March 1860

Rose latish ― one sleep & sleep forever.

(All day long, which is & was quite warm & utterly gray, & scirocco ―― worked at the 3 Parnasses ― not ill.)

Went to Macbeans’ ― no news: ― the Piedmont troops 4500 have landed at Leghorn. ― ―――

I wish M. did not ―――― hadn’t a [ζραβισμος , δεν εμπορω ποτε να φαλω πιζιαν εις ενα ανθρωπον που εχη ζραφισμος, ισως εχω αδικον, αλλα δεν εμπωρωνα καμω αλλα ως ιδομεν]!  ― ((I suspect Lear is trying to pun on “strabismus” and “sgrafismus,” but actually I can’t make out his meaning.))

Worked by fitz ― & pretty hard: but what a change to hot weather! ―
2 Miss Monks came. ― δια των οποιων, δεν εινας να γραψω.((Of which, there is [reason] to write (GT).))

At 6 walked round half the sad dull Borghese. ―Oh! I hope never to pass a whole winter here more!

γευμα ― μονος: και παραπολυ κρασι ― ως always.((Dined alone: and had too much wine, as always (GT).))

Terry & Mrs. Crawford came.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Thursday, 29 March 1860

Wrote to F.L.

No particular news, but everything more & more unsettled. Went to Macbeans, ― & with him to see the Pope’s Bull of Scomunica, posted on the M. Citorio. Called on P.W. ― & on Martin. ―

At 1 Miss Cushman, Miss Stebbins, & the nice Mr. & Mrs. Fields, came: ἔπειτα ((Then.)) ― Ferry, ― later, Clarke ― who, tho’ a nice cheery good fellow, is very “watering=placy.”

Worked on, but not very constantly ― till 5 & then came Col. Gordon & Mrs. Gordon, & Mrs. Macbean, ― a very “sincere party” ― & one I extremely like.

All seem to like the Clive Dead Sea: & indeed all the others. But, I begin to think, I shall pack up the small pictures, & dispose myself to go. ―――
Giorgio, ― unwell yesterday, is better to day.

At 6 walked a small way with [sic] the dreary Borghese ― & back.
Dined alone ― pigeons & Artichõχ. ―

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Wednesday, 28 March 1860

X13

Always fine now, & fires only morning & evening.

Worked, but only off & on ― at one of the 3 Parnassi.

To Macbeans. Times stopped. Everything ugly. ―

Benouville came ― sad & worried: but a nice fellow

Macan ― (I regret saying looking very unwell,) Lord Dunglass & his brother ― came. ― (& I found F. Stanley had been, & wrote to him thereby.) ― Afterwards came “Freddy” ― not grown very tall ― but “giusto” ((Just right.)) as Giorgio says. ― Too like his mother ― but yet with much ― to me, very interesting in his face. In manner he had some of the stiffness of Stanley=Skelmersdale, but was evidently kindly, & wishing to do well. ― He sate nearly an hour, ― after I went on working, & my general impression was that the Hornby=Stanley predominated, over the Skel., altogether now & then that obtrudes itself ― only however by a fancied link of look. ― His account of Pæstum &c. ― were all lively & boyish enough, & I do not perceive anything of the talent of his brother, unless he be of a concealing turn of mind ― though he said nothing but what was sensible. Altogether I am extremely pleased with his visit ― grandson of dear kind Lord Derby as he was.

Eh ―― days of Knowsley!

So, then came 3 Martins & a friend, ―― & then 3 Storys, & then Mr. Watts the Curate chaplain, & lastly Bessie & A. Bertie Mathews: ― all seem to like the paintings extremely, but it is hard to say, if better on account of their qualities, or that they care for the Painter, or that, caring for neither painter nor paintings, they cannot help liking that wh. is not usually to be seen. ――― At 6 walked to the Pincian ― & home to dine.

[They] say, George is recalled: ―――

X X

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 27 March 1860

Sent letter to Ann.

Letter from Ann. S. will surely go out again. Wrote to her, advising as far as I could. ―

There is no hope or chance of her being able to live with either of her sisters, though she has assuredly done her utmost to do so. Ellen does not wish it, & S. could only live in the I. of W. which would be impossible for Ann.

Day fine. Macbeans.

Worked at Farquhar’s Parnassus, & the others.

To Macbeans, ― but I did not hear any news. ―

Returned & the Fosters, with Miss Dowdeswell came ― “an affected piece” as the old birds wrote. The Fosters are not so. ― Then came Jameson, & the 2 Miss J.s ― both really nice girls: ― J. bought the little Campagna picture. 35£ ― which fact is very expressive of his real admiration of scenery. ― (Earlier, I forgot to relate, I “bedemeaned” myself, by leaving a card on “Freddy” Stanley, ((whom, lachrymosely Mrs. Caldwell told me yesterday had come here, ―)) yet, remembering Knowsely in 1830 I could not but do so.) After the Jamesons came poor Miss Tullok, who is very sadly an instance of the life away from love. ― Yet she herself is a good kind creature. Her perceptious indagini ((Investigations.)) of my “wealth” were diverting. Afterwards came 2 people I didn’t even know the names of, but friends of the Reynolds’, or I shouldn’t have seen ’em: ― & then, I worked till 5½. A short walk in the Borghese conscrewded the day. ― Returned to dine solo ― ―

Spillman dinner.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Monday, 26 March 1860

Sent letters to Dickenson, Stansfeld, Sandbach, Potter, Reid, Clive, Edwards.

Worked at Clermont’s Bruce’s Parnassus ― off & on all day.

Went to Macbeans, & sent various letters to ask people to come in. Very fine weather.

3 Jervoises came, & 2 Macbeans, & 1 Malcolm, & 2 Parishes ―. ― 2 Reynolds, Miss Webb,

At 5½ called on Helen R. ― at 6½ to the Reynolds ― who had persuaded me to dine there ― against my will.

3 JamesonsP. Williams, Payne, ― Maj.r Oldfield, Misses Cushman & Stebbins, ― & Clark.

[Wh ] the dinner was long, & piuttosto tea[-]juice. Miss Jameson, on the right, is a very sweet nice girl, ― clear[-]eyed & open[-]faced, ― & somewhat recalling L.L. ――― Miss Yates, “on the left” ― was talkative & sharpy: ― her comparisons & contradictions are sadly tiresome, ― though she has much cleverness. ― After dinner, Clark & Payne, went away. ― Talking remained ― old China, & drawings. Mrs. Jameson & Ardee collections, Miss Cushman & Miss Stebbin. ― The Hosmer, it seems, is gone off to America, moribondo il di lei padre.((Her father being moribund.))

Returned by 11.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Sunday, 25 March 1860

Gray day: no rain.

Did not go out.

Wrote to Sir J. Reid, Mrs. Potter, Mrs. Sandbach, Mr. Edwards, Mrs Clive, & H. Stansfeld

asking for
£
20
30
25
&30
―――
105

No one in the Corso, so I suppose there is some demonstration  elsewhere.

G. is out. A queer sort of man came with a letter to him, ― & would not give it to me. ――

At 6 to Macbeans. Procession of holy somebodies, ―― Newton, O’Brien, ― & the Malcolms at Dinner. As usual ― immensely pleasant. The Monday affair was very much discussed. Tuscany is annexed. ((Tuscany, Parma and Modena, already united into the United Provinces of Central Italy, voted to be annexed to the Kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia after Napoleon III agreed to recognize the annexations in exchange for Savoy and Nice.))

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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