Monthly Archives: October 2011

Thursday, 31 October 1861

Wrote to
1 Maclean
2 R. Boswell ― with 2nd half of 10£ note
3 W. Nevill.
4 Jessy Foy
5 Taylor
6 G. Kokali
7 Lady Goldsmid
8 Lady G. Grey.

[Ver]y fine & bright day. It certainly has been a lovely autumn.

No letters: ― wrote 8.

Dickens came. ― At 11 to Rouledge’s & saw Mr. R. who won’t buy the Nonsense, but offers to purchase 1000.

Then to Mrs. Leakes ―― poor Lady! After telling me about some friends in Corfû ― we went into Lunch, during which she consulted me about dear Col Leakes Epitaph: ― & I suggested an insertion relation  to his Archæological works ―

Her words stood.

An accomplished scholar
He was distinguished for his search after truth.
He preserved the ˇ[ancient] History of Greece from obscurity,
& the modern from misrepresentation ――

Mine ―――

An accomplished Scholar,
He was distinguished no less by his search after truth,
Than by his assiduity in communicating it to others:
And, through his many Archæological & Topographical publications, he rescued &c. &c.

I went at 2 ― & taking leave of her, she surprised me greatly by offering me a note ― saying in the sweetest & kindest way, yet greatly affected ― that she wished to give me some memorial of her husband, who had taken such interest in me & my works ―: the note contained Fifty pounds!! ―――――――――

Ἀς ἐυχαριξουμεν τὸν Θέον! ((Let us thank God! (NB).))

Home, & to Drummonds, where I drew 30£ then to J. Senior’s, where I read & signed my will, ― & received the Probates of my grandmother’s & dear Ann’s. ― Bern came in for a minute.

Home again ― no Clowes, ― so I took 2 Pheasants of Surrenden=Dering, ― & a book, & 2 mosaics, & walked to Brompton, where I dined with the poor Coombes ― who are naturally sad ― as that old [Prater], dying with over 100,000£ ― has left them nothing ― & worse, ― withdraws by his death an annual 20£! ―――― Walked back.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Wednesday, 30 October 1861

Exceedingly lovely till noon ― then cloudier, but fine.

Out on the Terrace at 9. Breakfast. Mrs. Galton is not altogether pleasant, ― tho’ civil to me. ―

Shewed Julian drawings. ― Talked a great deal with Lady G. who grows as it were sensibly.

Sir F. & I walked out from 12.12 to 1.15.

Then Lunch: & Miss Rowen came also.

At 2.45 left these accomplished & truly kindly & agreable people ― & came by rail to town at 5.20 ― to Stratford Pl. at 6.

Found letters from
1 Jessy Foy ― asking to dine.
2 E.A. Drummond: ― very nice.
3 Whitmore, (about a frame stand.)
4 Lord Clermont ― very kind.
5 Maclean: ― extremely satisfactory & good.
6 Lady Georgiana Grey ― kind as always ― asking me to dine on Sunday.
7 R.S. Boswell: acknowledging receipt of half 10£ note. ― and
8 Taylor of Corfu ―.

Bought Canphor & packed Carpets ― & at 7.30 dined. ――

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 29 October 1861

Morning very fine. Rose late ― 9. ― Terrace & Autumn tints. ―― Breakfast. Mrs. G. has a certain harshness. ― Shewed drawings ― & Sir F. & Lady G. chose an Athos picture ― for 12£. Nothing can be nicer than their wholly well-bred modes & ways, nor more lastingly pleasant than the memories of their kindnesses.

Lunch. Mrs. G. absurd ― wishing to go out to Easwell ― whereas it rained hard. Mrs. G. is not very wise. Julian Goldsmid came ― a pleasant young fellow. Talked with Lady G. a good deal: she is certainly A. N°. 1 ― for fascination of Commonsense & good-breeding converse. ― At 3.45 Sir F., J.G. & I walked out ―: Julian’s descriptions of Norway were pleasant enough. Pouring rain: & the village of Egerton. Returned & dressed.

7.30 dinner ―― Mrs. G.’s singing & mine. ―

Read of a Lverpool Steamer wrecked.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Monday, 28 October 1861

28398. Number of Bank Note for 10£ ― half of which I sent to R.S.B. by post.

At 11.10 to L. Bridge: & so to Puckley; & to Surrenden Dering by 2.

Lady Goldsmid was at Lunch, with Mrs. Galton & her 2 little girls ― & a Miss Thomas ― (Frances T.’s niece,)[.]

Afterwards Lady G. Miss T. & I walked out ―: a pleasant day, pleasant walk, pleasant company. ―

Sir F. out hunting ― returned at 7. ―

So we dined at 7.30. ― “Nonsenses” exhibited, & bed early.

But all really happy ‘lines.’

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Sunday, 27 October 1861

Fine. Wrote to
James Edwards.
F.L.
Mrs. Husey Hunt.
Dickenson.
& Maclean {about the “Nonsense” &c. &c.
& C. Fortescue

Went out at 3. ― Walked to the Post ― C. Fortescues ― & then Belgrave Square. Lady Grey’s ― &c. &c. ― & Mrs. Stanley’s. Mary Stanley was there ― not Arthur ― & Mrs. E.S. ― but she had bad cold. Mary S. was very communicative, & amiable: told me how she & A.P.S. had gone to Cracow, the Danube, the Black Sea, & [unreadable] Sebastopol; ― whence she to Sebastopol, ― he in a Russian Steamer, (meeting Clark at the Dardanelles?) to Ρουσσκὸν, ((Nina Bouri writes: “I think he means Russian or Rossikon, the Agiou Panteleimonos monastery.”)) so to Ξεροποτάμο, Σιμόπετρα, Διονύσιο, Γρεγώριο, & Παύλος, where Clark was ill: ― then they went to Καρυὲς και Λαύρα, Καρακάλλα, Φιλοθέο, Ιβήρον, Σταυρονικήτας, Παντοκράτορα & Κουτλουμούσι, ― and so to Βατοπαίδι, Ἐσφιγμένη & Χιλιάνδριον, ― whence Clark, ― being tied to time, went, & A. also, to Saloniki. After C. went home however, A.P.S. went again with consul, to Ζωγράφου, Κοσταμονίτης, Διοχιαρεῖον, Ξενοφόντος ―. ((Nina clarifies: “All these are monasteries on Mount Athos, (namely Xiropotamou, Simonos Petras, Dionysiou, Osiou Grigoriou, Agiou Pavlou, Great Lavra, Karakalou, Filotheou, Iviron, Stavronikita, Pantokratoros, Koutloumousiou, Vatopedi, Esphigmenou, Helandrariou, Zografou, Konstamonitou, Dochiariou, Xenophontos) except from Karyes which is the capital.”)) The 2 Arthur & M.S. ― meeting again at the Dardanelles, both went to Athens, & thence to all the Thebes, Lebadea, & Delphi North of Greece; returning by Corfû, Venice, & the Mt. Cenis. ―

These are certainly travelers.

At 5 I went to Fairbairn’s, where was only T. Woolner: Mrs. F. & the 3 children.

Every hour is pleasant with that family. T.F. is an extremely remarkable man.

They went off to Manchester at 8.30.

ἀλλ᾽Ἐγώ ἐπερπάτησα μονος εἰς τὴν οἰκειαν. ((But I walked home alone (NB).)) ―

XX11

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 26 October 1861

Very fine all day. Dalzells man came ― & brought the last of the 112 prints of nonsense.

Cab to Rail ― Waterloo ― & so to Leatherhead, ― Sarah & Ellen, the last sisters, coming to meet me.

It is not so long ago, since dearest Ann, besides Harriett & Mary were there also.

The day was pleasant enough ― for I made them laugh, & talked constantly.

Mr. & Mrs. Waite came: she is very pretty & pleasant. At 5 Sarah walked part of the way with me. ―

Home by 7.

Letters from James Edwards, & F.L. ― the Husey Hunts, & Arthur P. Stanley had been.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 25 October 1861

Dull gray, but not wet.

Maclean came ― & seemed willing to give up all idea of the Nonsense book in future ― & also willing to undertake a Corfû book. Then T. Fairbairn, Mrs. F. & 2 boys: ― F. was greatly delighted with the pictures, & gave me a commission for a 150£ Florence. ―

A letter came this morning from the elder Edwards, asking me to postpone my visit to after the 16th. ― As he had at first voluntarily [] the 1st, I cannot understand this ― unless it may be that James & he are not on good terms enough to have a birthday gathering. So I wrote to him, & to James ― & Mrs. Scrivens.

I think now I should wholly give up the North, & get away if I can about the 7th from town ― & the 9th from England.

Later ― at 1 I took the Petraja & Thebes over to poor W.F. Beadon, who seemed dreadfully ill ― but always vividly bright in mond. ― Later, a Colonel St. Maur called ―: he said he had a View of Naples painted by me, ― “wh. he had got from Lord Ward.” ―――

Having packed somewhat ― I went at 3 to Daddy Hunt’s, & staid with him till 5.30 ― when he walked to Goucester Place with me, on his way to Friths. He & I agree about the Beauforts, & also on Palgrave. He, poor fellow, is most sadly tried by his heartless & ungrateful family. ―

Came home at 6.30.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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