Monday, 5 December 1864

O dear me! No rest or peace. ― And yet this “Corniche road” must be done. So, having risen at 7, I began to pack, & didn’t breakfast till 10. No letters or papers. After all sorts of trials, I decided on taking a large trunk, & G. his box. Did the 3rd process of one small drawing ― 22 in all, & then shut up shop. At 2 went to [Avidor’s], & got 25 ˇ[3fr.] Maps for 20£ ― a Drummond Circular. Paid a bill of Berlandini’s ― 81fr., & found at the Diligence office that they could take no luggage after 7. So I ἀποφάσισα,[1] & took 2 places for self & G. (10fr. the 2,) & to send the luggage overnight. Left cards at the Reillys ― & home ― where I finished all packing & sent G. with the things. At 4. went to Lady Duncans ― but clouds & winds arise. Returned to dress & dine at Mr. Lyons.

1864-12-05

Clouds & high wind.

Home by 9.30. Finished all packing & bed.


[1] Decided.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Sunday, 4 December 1864

Nice. 4 December 1864. (14) Watercolor, sepia ink and Chinese white over graphite on tan paper. 37.4 x 54 cm.

Nice. 4 December 1864. (14) Watercolor, sepia ink and Chinese white over graphite on tan paper. 37.4 x 54 cm.

Rose before 6. Off ― at 7.15. Vastly bright, & sharp or as G. said ― like as if the top of a mountain. I have given G. a new hat like mine, which he says the porter seemed to think τὸ ἴδιον,[1] & added, “τώρα ἐάν ἐφεροῦσακι ὀμματαυαλά ἢτον ωραῖον.”[2] We went to the little chapel of S. Carlo on the Genoa road, & there, & above it I drew from 9.30 to 4.30 ― stopping for an hour at 1 for lunch. We got back by 6. A most quiet & pleasant day.

At 7. dinner ― having written to ‘Fergusson’ & T. Cooper. Soup & Beefsteak Pudding serve to keep the Suliot’s talents going, & his master’s temper in order. Afterwards, “penned out” a great blessing ― now we have our Lamps. Also heard G. read. 6 sentences ἐις τρία γλώσσας.[3]

I am fully prepared for the journey along the “Corniche” ― yet dislike the move nevertheless.


[1] [It was] the same (NB).

[2] Now, if I [or he] wore eyeglasses, it was [would be?] nice (NB).

[3] In three languages.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Saturday, 3 December 1864

Same brilliant & clear & lovely weather.

Worked all day at the Tyrants. The 3rd process takes much longer than the 1st or 2nd process.

At 3.30 came Mannerly & Mrs. Sutton ― & looked at Egypt drawings. She is as pretty & foolish a woman as one has seen in a long time. He a straightforward pleasant fellow.

At 4.30 ― called on Mrs. Smith-Barry.

Dined al solito, μοναχῶς. But poor Giorgio said θὰ ἒχει νέον πρᾶγμα, ποῦ δὲν ἒφαγες ποτὲ ὣς ἐμαγείρευσ’ ἐγὼ: τὸ ἒκαμεν κατὰ τὸ κεφάλι μου.[1] & is! it was a beefsteak, pudding & giblets!

Enquired about Diligence to go to Mentone on Tuesday.

19th day of 240 Tyrants.

A          2
B―       1
C          2
D          3
___
8            ― 21. in all.


[1] You will have a new thing, that you haven’t eaten as I make it: I dreamt it up myself (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Friday, 2 December 1864

XXX1

Insane & miserable night. Gnats ― & nerves, & indigestion. Day lovely.

Rose, ὅμως,[1] at 7. Very nice letter from Mrs. G. Clive[.] Calls ― Deakin, & Mannerly Sutton.

Worked hard all day ― beginning in complete despair but ending better.

Day, cloudy early ― & I thought the weather was broken up but it became as bright as ever: & colder.

Called on Mrs. Saltmarshe, & on the 2 Cortazzi: then shoppingly bought ― hat for G., & a flask for myself.

Dined, read life of Lockhart ― kindly sent me by Mr. Lyon.

And penned out more than half of a large drawing of Villefranche till 10. I don’t like the idea of a long 3 or 4 or 5 week’s journey: ― but when, if not now, are the Corniìche drawings to be made?

^[Yesterday] 17 & 18th day ^[(today)] of the 240 Tyrants.

A ―    3}            Third Process.
B         6}
C         2}
D         2}
13


[1] However.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Thursday, 1 December 1864

The same bright & lovely weather, but clouding at 3 or 4 ― & looking as if it will change tomorrow.

A month comfortlessly began.

Rose at 7. Wrote to Mrs. Reilly declining to dine: ― for if I begin, I can’t stop or draw a line. ―

No letters. (A paper ― David Roberts is dead: ― last I met him at Genl. Rawdons, & at Hardwickes: he was 68.)

Worked, ― (but cold), ― & ill=worked at the drawings ― till past 4: utterly out of heart. ―

Then walked to Higgins’s Villa, with a note, declining also to dine there; ― he had called today at 10. Coming out of his villa I met him & Mrs. H.: ― a bore.

Called on Mr. Lyon ― unwell: & only saw Mrs. Deakin, who hutterly houtraged hall my hopinions of haspirates.

Returned home at 6.30: & found a sack (“Colossés”) made to order & measure, & keeping me waiting a week ― just 3 inches too small: so I was in a rage. Dined: ― but have no heart to pen out, tho’ everything is ready ― Lamps ― drawing &c.

We are constantly in “gloomy days.” On the whole, I am “ashamed” to have come to such a place as this. Well for me if I can stay till April.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Wednesday, 30 November 1864

Perfectly bright, tranquil, lovely, all day.

Rose at 6: & swiftly arranging all things, G. & I shut up rooms, & got off ― having had Coffee ― at 7.15.

We walked to the Bridge, & then took a 1 hour fly (for 4fr.[)] to Villefranche. Hence we went above the town, & I drew hard at various places till 12.30. The pines are most lovely, & the contrast of their parrot-green with the purple-gray sea & hill, & the sparkly little town below, vastly pretty. Walking to S. Jean, we got to some olives, facing the long Mountain Corniche wall, & there lunched ― talking of Crete.

At 2 came away, & drew twice nearer Beaulieu; whence, more slowly we reached Villefranche again by 4, & getting to the top of the Col. by 4.30, were at the Post Office by 5 ― & home before 6.

Found 2 letters, from J.O. & Mrs. Reilly ― both asking me to dinner. What to do? “My poverty, but not my will consents.”[1] ― What chance of making some 20 or 10 drawings if I go nowhere? On the other hand, what chance of peace if I go anywhere? I incline to go to Mentone as soon as possible: or at least to Eza.

Meanwhile― here ends November.

Dinner: & heard G. read ― 6 sentences in Italian, Greek, & English, ― which last he now reads best of all 3. ―

XX9


[1] Romeo and Juliet V.1.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Tuesday, 29 November 1864

Fine early ― but clouding by degrees.

No letters or paper. Wrote to T. Cooper to send no more Daily Telegraphs.

Came the 2 Pillischer Lamps; vastly joyful “arrangement” ― as are all here ― barring the Newspaper posts. I have written today to say no more daily papers are to be sent.

Worked hard till 3. ― finishing all the 2nd process of the 155 drawings already begun: γελωείδες πράγμα εἶναι.[1]

Walked out: left card on Mannerly Sutton ― out: then walked nearly to S. Pons ― returning to Lady Duncan’s: ― poor Anna D, coughs sadly still.

Some Miss Sinclair came. At dark I tumbled down to the town ― & finding an Italian shop, brought [sic] a lot of comestibili.[2]

Home, & dined at 7. At 9 ― having heard G. read ― I am going to prepare for tomorrow. ―

16th day of 240 Tyrants. Got through 11 2nd process ― being 155 in all ― 2nd process completed.

154 ― one being Gussie Bethells!


[1] I think he was going for “γελοιώδες”: “it’s ridiculous” probably meaning “easy” (NB).

[2] Food.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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