Monthly Archives: April 2011

Tuesday, 30 April 1861

Note from H. Mildmay ― & £350― for Damascus. {Began on canvass 17. Febry. 1860

Charles G. Wynne.
C.G. Wynne ― Juniorissimo.
Mr. Mildmay.
Miss Clive

Worked at Cedars, & wrote many notes. Went out at 5 ― called on F. Sykes, & F. Thrupp, the last very dreamy: ― then to have my hair cut, but the rooms were full, so I came away, & returning up Bond St. lo! John E. Cross, & a little boy, who was Henry Phipps Denison. They 2 came home with me & saw the pictures & then the dear little chap played so beautifully! ― The “Cloches du Monastere” for example! So I gave him a Calabria and 3 songs, greatly pleased both of us. To dinner at 7.30 to Sir W. James’s.

Evening quiet & not unagreable. ― Lady Cranworth very pleasant & amusing.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Monday, 29 April 1861

[XXX] ((Blotted.)) ― a sad morning! Dry & cold.

Mr. Wood
Miss Wood            most pleasant & nice
Lady Mary Wood

Lady Elizabeth Grey
[Sir] Francis Grey later these 3 ― also delightful ((The list is in part blotted and difficult to read.))
Fred Sykes. ――― at 5: greatly altered, but a good kind fellow ―: it is not easy to resume anyone (after 14 years,) at once.

Walked out & left cards at Mrs. Farquhar, & Lady S. Vernon. Saw F.W. Gibbs.

At home ― dined at 7.30 ― μόνος.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Sunday, 28 April 1861

Gray. ― dry early.

Wrote to John E. Cross.

C. Fortescue breakfasted with me ―: pleasant ― much talk of A.P. Stanley’s article on Essays & Reviews. He left at 1.20. I went out (μόνος) & called on the Godleys: J.G. is  I think ill beyond hope, & she looks sadly. ― Then on Wynnes, where I lunched with Mr. W. & the 2 Miss W.s (they tell me the Q. never knew the disorder of the Dss. of K. ((The duchess of Kent, Queen Victoria’s mother, had died on 16 March 1861.)) & the Dss. did not recognize her at her last visit: & consequently the Q. has never spoken to P.A. since, he having kept the matter from her. And that she is having a statue made of the Dss., (by Theed!) dressed & coloured like life.)

3dly on Crakes: Mr. C. is still more feeble ― & goes to St. Leonards on []. ((A blot covers the rest of the line.))

Walked as far as the Church, with M.A.C. & called on (4th) Simeon ― where I saw his daughters. ― 5th Col. Sykes ― out. home: & [found] ((Blotted.)) Frith & 2 daughters at the door. Also Fairbairn had called.

Out again and called on ˇ[6] Fairbairn, 7 ― Bouverie, 8 Lushington, 9. Adderley ― all out. 10. Sir W. James ― Walter better ― home again by 6.30. 7.40 Dowager Countess Greys.

Lady G. told me (before people came,) that it is true the Q. never knew of the Dss.’s complaint, cancer ― nor does she now ― but says the Newspaper stories are false ― & it is not thought worth while to undeceive her. And the Dss. herself never knew ― being never told ― & tho’ she had 5 aperte ferite ((Open wounds.)) ― grew weaker, [thinking] herself very ill, but thankful that she had no positive disease like Cancer.

It was [―] a query with me, why the 2 Royal folk would not acknowledge to cancer? ― simply vulgar terror of an ugly disease, or lofty avoidance of an unroyal unpleasantness. ― The 2 Woods were very nice & simple ― shewing lots of sketches ― (possibly preordained to do so by Lady G.G. ―) of Nice ― very clear & forcible: ― & each lauding the other’s work: ― both pleasant juveniles. ― Dr. B. I thought ill bred. Genl. C. Grey came in ― but I did not think him delightful. Countess Grey fast leaving our world. All the children of this Lady seem kind & respectful to her. ―

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 27 April 1861

Quite dark till 12 ― fog ― & rain.

Then snow! (It snowed to 2 or 3 P.M.)

Of course no work could be done. Foords men came, & fixed in the Damascus & Beirût.

Sent the old sketch or design of Bethell’s Parnassus to Sybella Clive as her wedding present.

Lunched at 3 ― & read Arthur Stanley’s excellent & beautiful Review of “Essays & Reviews.” ((In the Edinburgh Review. Vol. 113, no. 230, April 1861. 236-256.))

Worked at the Cedars till 5. ― Called on Clowes, out, & Foords. Damp ― cold ― dark dirty.

Health, I rejoice to say, better.

But the sore strange pain of Ann’s loss seems never to heal.

Dined at Sir W. James ― kind good people. Their little boy had met with a curious accident, ― the string of a large top wound up tightly suddenly ran out, & tore off his nail.

Pleasant quiet evening.

Sir W.J. (who was at Oxford with J. Ruskin ―) said there was always something odd about him ― & that his parents brought him there & that Mr. R. Senior ― said, (requesting a private interview with the dean of C. Church,) “would it be against the rules of the University for my son to have a Chessboard in his room?[”]

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 26 April 1861

Dry ― gray ― cold: dim ―

Ἃς μοῦ βοηθήσῃ ὁ Θεός! ((May God help me! (NB).))

ˇ[came] Mansfield Parkyns, who staid till 3 ― from 11. Gibbs ― F.W. C.S. Fortescue.

Charles Dixon ― who used to be at Sass’s ((Sass’s School of Art, Bloomsbury, prepared its students for the entrance examination to the Royal Academy Schools. Lear did not camplete the course.)) ― in 1834,5, & who has been in India ever since. !!

Later ― Lady Goldsmid, Mrs. & Miss Proctor.

Worked by fits at the Cedars.

At 5 ― went out; to Goulds ― who was singularly vulgar & odious ― & as he is always so more or less, that means something frightful. ― D. Wyatts ― out. Foord’s ― & back.

At 7.45 to Mrs. Mildmay’s, a house of wealth.

It is useless to write down all or part of what one feels: ― so I do not note how dear Ann’s death comes to me so vividly & drearily often & often.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Thursday, 25 April 1861

Dry ― gray ―

Worked at Cedars ― but very brokenly.

Mrs. Mildmay, & 2 daughters came.

Octavius Smith, Mrs. Smith, & Col. Nicholson.

Later, C.M. Church ― good kind fellow.

At 5 I went out, & called on Col. Sykes, Crakes, Bethells, & Col. Hornby.

Dined with F.L. ― who came home with me afterwards, & staid till nearly 12. ―

Notes from Mrs. Clive, & H.S.J. Mildmay, about purchasing the Damascus.

XX

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Wednesday, 24 April 1861

Fine ― dry again.

At 11 came Mr. & Mrs. EvansMiss Gisborne, & one “Contine.”

Later ― H. Mildmay, & Sybella Clive.

Ἔπειτα, ((Then)) William Nevill.

At 4 I walked to Lady James’s, & to Millais’s, leaving cards, & to Col. Hornby’s: ― Lady Denison has returned.

Dress, ― & to Sir F. Goldsmid’s ――

Lady G. ― Miss ? a sculptress ―― Mrs. Montagu, & Mrs. Proctor, whom I like ― indeed all the women. ― One man only ― a Mr. Drake, or Drax: vulgar piuttosto, but lively. ― R.F. Burton is married ― says Mrs. Proctor. Lady G. is extremely charming & pleasant: ― later, talking of Miss ? (the sculptress ―) I most stupidly said “something about her eyes prevents her being handsome.” ― Now, Lady G.’s eyes are not good, ― & I was disgusted with my folly. After dinner I could not help singing ― as lady G. asked me ―: “Drax” evidently hated music. ―

At last, singing Love & Death ― he burst out at the end ― “the Ass between the 2 bundles of Hay!” for which I delighted in him.

But it seems I have fallen into cœrulæan lands. ― Andiam. ((“Let’s go!” or “come on.”))

Returning home at 11: ― George Middleton overtook me. ―

MARY DIED AT SEA ― THIS DAY.
JUNE. 29. 1861.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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