Monthly Archives: October 2009

Monday, 31 October 1859

Left the kind H. Hunts at 11.15 ― & to Brighton. The T. Potters very kind.

Bitterly cold day: throat bad. ――

Walked with T.P. who told me a great deal about the G. Scrivens ― & Sir S. ― ― called on R. Nevill.

Dinner ― John & Mrs. J. Crake, & Miss [Jeune]. ―

Sang a good deal. ―

X16

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Sunday, 30 October 1859

How blackly drearily cold!! ―

Wrote to Ann, & Hansen: ordering a bed for Tuesday at the framer’s ― & telling Ann ― poor dear, ― about the R. Charter.

Walk in the Garden with B.H.H. ― & wrote while they were at church ―: ah! How Cold! ― Lunch: & thence pouring rain all day. Read them my Judaea Journal, ― but there is now no R.A.H. ― nor Mr. [Fish] to set my writing right. ―

Dinner & evening very pleasant.

Letter from A. Heywood ― & £52.10.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 29 October 1859

Rose at 7. ― packed till 11. ――

Letter from Ann, enclosing poor Mary’s ― a most sad one. Sarah seems to have left towards the end of July, & may have really been in the vessel! ―

Left cards P.P.C. & came to Rail at 12. Mrs. Henry Bruce was there. ― & G. & Mrs. G. Scrivens ― with whom I came on to Lewes. Day fine. Walked with Mrs. H.H. & Julia S.

Dined at 6½.

Always pleasant ― & these people are kindness itself.

But I am cold ― & hate winter: ― & unhappy at thinking of the Royal Charter.

Sleepless & sad.

X15

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 28 October 1859

XX14

Alas!

Very stormy ― but not cold.

Packed.

V. Crake called & lent me 10£

Letters from T. Potter & Mr. Edwards.

Wrote to
T. Potter
Dickenson
Hansen.
Cooper.
Ann
& W. Newsom.

Read accounts of the loss of the Royal Charter off Beaumaris. It is possible that Sarah may have been in this vessel: but I shall not think of it, as we cannot know about her as yet. ―
Called on Sir Woodbine Parish ― a highly agreable & very “superior” man. His drawings of Ali Pasha ― of [Barges], ― & those of Lord Macartney’s Embassy ― those of Peru & Brazil ― were immensely curious & interesting. ― Then, returned, & sent off 3 cases. At 5 to Hastings, where I [brought] baskets for Ann, & “Miss [Tharnwood]” & called on the W. Scrivens ― leaving P.P.C. on others, & returning to the G.S.s to dine for the last time. The evening was very pleasant ―. I leave these really kind & hospitable people with regret. Left ― (after singing,) at 10½ ―: a most dreadful night of rain & terrible wind. O! the sufferings at sea!

Wet through ― & glad to think of leaving Hastings ― for it is not fit for winter weather. ―

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Thursday, 27 October 1859

Dreary cold ―: little wind, or frost, but yet cold.

Wrote to
Mrs. Empson

Wrote out Petra Journals. ― Papers, about Italy ― not pleasant. ―

Packed ― casually & slowly.

At 4½ ― Sir Woodbine & Lady Parish came ―: Sir W.P. was the Commissioner at Parga!! ― He is the last of a long range of people, whom, connected with Alì Pasha ― & others, I once wished to see. Now: those wishes are past. ― Chancellor Raikes, Lord Broughton, Parker of Cuerton, Col. Leake. Cockerell, Hughes & others ― are of that magic circle.

At 5 I walked to Hastings ― & sate a while with Mrs. G. & G. Scrivens. Returned at 6½ to dine.

Very kind letter from Mrs. Empson ― wh. I replied to.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Wednesday, 26 October 1859

Fine early ― but the damages from the sea yesterday ― very great. ― The Milkman’s cottage surrounded & all his pigs & poultry [found]. ― Railway broken down between here & Bexhill ― water ― water, everywhere. A greater tide & more devastation was expected ― but the wind ―  (S.E.) changed to S.W. & so calmed. ― To my rooms ― came ― Mr. Gipps: & later Mr. St. Quentin’s, who is “distinctly” a most agreable man, & Mrs. S.Q. who is the same (δολυκὴ.) ― & Lady Chelsea ― & her son ― & another younger lady. ― ―

After they went ― I walked to Hastings: sitting some time with Mrs. G.S. & then to W.S.

No one there, ― kind-hearted [Bessy] ― so true, & Lancashire! So British! staid & sang till nearly 11 ―

[gr.]

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 25 October 1859

X13

Miserable work.

A most frightful day of tempest & torrents ― never ceasing till 5 ― when I went to the post with letters ― hardly able to stand for wind.

Wrote to Mrs. H. Hunt
Mr. Edwards
Mr. Langton
A. Heywood

H. Holland, Mr. & Mrs. W. Scrivens called ― & Mr. Acramen.

But the rooms were sadly cold & windy. Packed a good deal. Accounts from Italy bad. ―

Letters from Mrs. Hunt, Mr. Edwards, & Mrs. G. Clive.

At 6¼ in a phly to V. Crake’s ― but the storm was now so tremendously high that I cannot remember a worse sight anywhere. At V.C.’s were G. Scrivens, Rev. Berriton, a Mr. Knox ― a Mr. Gipps ― & a Mr. Richards. ― Dinner not unpleasant. ― Mrs. V.C. is very childlike senseless somehow; I liked N°. 1 better. ―

Barriton is thinking & “clever” & agreable. ― Knox next to me was also prepossessing. Afterwards Mrs. V.C. played ― fluffily, yet evidently from much education ― & might play well. ― I ― after a time sang ― &, as this piano was good & room empty ― very well, ― tho’ I had little voice. (già ― si capisce.) ((“Yes, of course!”)) “Too late” ― “Sweet is true love” ― seem to take the attention of people more than any songs I ever made. ― Came home at 10½. Rain ceased ― wind violent: But the sea tremendous. Waves dashing up the steps of the houses & in torrents to the areas. Wet through to the knees. Never saw such a sea here. How I recall Corfû & the sea [gr.] [walls].

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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