Monthly Archives: November 2013

Monday, 30 November 1863

Colder ― foggier, ― drearier, ― darker.

Wrote all day ― but as many receipts had to be written, I only managed 22 of the letters asking for the tin.

Only Terrick Hamilton, kind old man ― 82 ― & bringing his 3..3.

Verily ― how much kindness there is! &, spite of my boorish crusty nature ― there must be much good in it to call forth such kindly feeling from so many ― & so different beings!

At 4 ― walked to the poor Crakes ― & to Fosters ― which last were in. Vague ― good folk.

Returned to dine alone: reading G. Sand’s Consuêlo ― & answering perpetual notes.

So ends November.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Sunday, 29 November 1863

Not so dark ― & fine all day.

Wrote all day long ― 33 letters in all ― & many of them long ones. At 5. Daddy Hunt came & sate till 6.45. Dressed: & to 58. Curzon St.

1863-11-29

O dear! how very queer!

“Ah! sad & strange!”

Home by 10.30.

A fine noble sweet nature has C. Fortescue.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Saturday, 28 November 1863

[S]ame dark ― but not wet weather.

Bad life. Wrote all day long ― some 40 letters ― asking for the Subscriptions: horrid work, but it must be done.

Two visits broke the miserable Monotony: “Sir Samuel & Lady Hancock” ― Dora Wentworth! ― a great pleasure indeed. She is still handsome, ― but how beautiful she used to be!

Later, Mrs. Chapman & Miss Ewart: who staid a good time. Wrote till 6.45.

To Edgar A. Drummonds.

1863-11-28

Curious discourses. E.A.D. more diffuse & polemic than usual. Miss P. is unlike her sister. Alfred D. is always kindly & pleasant. Mrs. D. ― (whose face is one with the greatest charm I know ― a strange sad beauty,) always perfect. At 11.30. Edgar D. walked home with me. || Found a letter from C.F. ― asking me to dine at Miss Bolton’s αὕριον[1] ― with Lady W. & him! ―


[1] Tomorrow.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Friday, 27 November 1863

Dark & dampy: but not wet or cold: ― dismal but beareable.

Many letters. 100 of the Subscribers have now paid ― but 230 more have to be written to!

No one came.

At 2.30 ― went to Gould’s ― to see Prince ― a good little man. But he was not at home ― though G. was: G. was less disgusting than sometimes ― but he is always a hog. E. Wilson’s remarx about him were really good ― as to how such a man could pourtray humming birds or anything refined. A queer fish.

Then to Dickensons. D. ages very much. The toil of English life is fearful ―― way what they may.

Then to Days ― seeing Mr. John ― ὅστις δὲν μ’ἀρέσκει.[1] He says 9 or 10 of the plates are all printed, I saw 4 or 4: not as I wished ― but cui bono to say anything??? They say all the printing shall be done by the 4th. ― Quien sabe?

Afterwards walked to Wilton Crescent & called on Mr. Carr ―. The servant said ― being a fooly man, ― “Mrs. Carr anxiously enquired if you had left any message Sir?” ― Ἀποκρίθην ― Οχι.[2]

Dined at the Blue Posts μ;πναχως.

& home by 7.

XX


[1] Whom I don’t like (NB).

[2] I answered ― No (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Thursday, 26 November 1863

Dark & dampish all day: but I did not go out.

Wrote all day long ― making out lists &c. ―

Only Sidney Lane came. ― but that was much.

Darkness came: & it was too late to go out. So I dined at home on cold beef & rice & sherry. ― & read George Sand’s Consuelo, which wonderfully delight me.

Οὓτως ἐτελιώθη, ταύτην τήν ἡμέραν, — ποτέ θα ἒλθωσι ἂλλαι πλέον ἐλευθερικαί;[1]

X

 


[1] And thus this day ended ― when will others, more libertarian, come? (NB)


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Wednesday, 25 November 1863

warm ― fine ― dampy.

Wrote many letters.

Corrected proofs. ―

At 3 ― walked to Hyde Park Gardens ― & across the Park to H.J. Bruce ― Mrs. W. Sandbach’s ― & Caves ― & Mr. Hamiltons. Except Mrs. S. ― all out.

Red & rote till 6.30. At 7.30 to 15 Belgravia Square. A house full of objiks of art & taste.

1863-11-25

Lady G.Q. was upstairs. Evening pleasant enough. Mrs. Weston certainly so. Also Miss L. who played really well.

E. Drummond walked home with me.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Tuesday, 24 November 1863

Foggy ― dark ― & wet: abominable.

Nice letter from the elder Edwards: ― wrote to him ― resolving he should have the Turin for 100Gs.

Sir Francis Scott is dead. {yesterday ― at St. Leonards.

Mr. Crake is dead. ―

Day sent Type=proofs ―: corrected them & sent back. Looked out books &c. for Corfû. ― This day last year I arrived there.

At 6.30 cab to Digby Wyatts’.

1863-11-24

Dinner, e tutto al solito,[1] delightful. The peculiar good of the Digby Wyatts is that they them selves are so wholly without display or affectation, that they can mix up such various people ― a social effort leading to immense good. I wish however that they introduced people more distinctly ― for I never knew who Barry was: ― & I said to him ― talking of vases with forms & outlines, “it seems to me so in architecture, for the St. Georges’s Hall at Lpool is form, whereas the Houses of Parliament have none: the former is independent of details ― the latter depnds on it for exterior success.” Pretty ― to the son of Sir C. Barry!! ― Bonomi is greatly aged.

 


[1] And everything as usual.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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