Monthly Archives: September 2011

Monday, 30 September 1861

Left St. Leonard’s at 10 ― & at 11 ― Hastings.

A fine day. Mrs. Napier & her children. Genl. & Mrs. Campbell.

At Ashford by 12.30. ― carriage sent by Lady Goldsmid ― & drive to Surrenden Dering, a charming large house in a lovely place. Lady G. & Sir F. & a Miss Goldsmid, very beautiful.

Lunch. Drive with Lady & Miss G. ― very pleasant. Walk in grounds with Miss G. & talk of Miss Emily B.’s book ― which we agree upon completely. Miss G. is evidently delightful in manner, intellect, & disposition.

A Miss Rowan ˇ[& a Miss Jekyll] ― & dinner: all pleasant. A nephew also  one Elim? &

Shewed nonsense drawings ―― gt. laughter. Sang a good deal: & Lady G. played.

Altogether, happier than for many a day.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1861, Diary Entry

Sunday, 29 September 1861

Fine.

Drew nonsenses.

At 12 ― called on A. Fowler.

Then, with the G. & W. Scrivens’s ―― walked to East Cliff.

Dined at the G.S. ―― & played & sang.

Fine day.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1861, Diary Entry

Saturday, 28 September 1861

Stormy & showery. Paid bills & ran about.

Mrs. V.C.
V. Crake.
3 Woodbine Parishes
3 Taylors
8 came ―

& just as it was pouring with rain, & I was wondering how I should get to the Crakes

C. Fortescue.

Dined at the Crakes.

Wet thro’ coming home, & savage.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1861, Diary Entry

Friday, 27 September 1861

Fine all day: no rain.

Dear me! what an astonishing bore are these idle days here! ―― They even begin to become interesting from their excessive immensity of boredoms ―

Letters from
Mrs. G. Clive ― very nice as usual.
Tarrant.
Dalziell
& a lot of nonsense proofs.

Arranged rooms for showing pictures &c. ―― & then, drew nonsenses: ―――

Came ―
1 Geo. Scrivens,
2 Mrs. Geo. Scrivens.
3 Mrs. Middleton.
4 W. Scrivens,
5 Mrs. W. Scrivens.
6 Capt. Dalrymple.
7 Edward Crake.
8 Mr. Harness.
9 Mrs. Crake.
10 Miss Crake
11 Mr. Napier
12 Mrs. Napier,
13 small Napier.
14 Mrs. Martineau
15 Miss Martineau
16 Miss Alice Martineau
17 Alfred Martineau
18 Edward Martineau.

At 6 went to Rail, but no C.F. nor by the last train. So I dined alone at the Sussex, sulkily.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1861, Diary Entry

Thursday, 26 September 1861

Fine & calm nearly all day ― small showers & cloudy at times. ―― Letters from Mrs. W.F. Beadon. W.F.B. not so well.

Took, & “saw off” ― 6 packages, by rail to Stratford Pl.

ˆ[1] trunk ― ˆ[2 3 4] 3 frames: ― ˆ[5] Easel: ― & ˆ[6] box of drawings. ―

Resolved, but with gt. difficulty, not to go to Littlegreen. ―

Wrote to T. Cooper: ― Dickenson: & Lady Goldsmid ˇ[to go there on Monday.]

Walked to Hastings ― saw G. Middleton ― & various Crakes ― & Mrs. G.S. & the poor A. Fowlers ―: their boy still lives.

Returned. Lunched at Crakes, & walked out with Edward ― & M.A.C. (who left us soon.) Spoke with E.C. of W.N. ―― he did not seem to recall that W.N. was his godfather.

Went to the Cemetery ― & returned by Ore: ― altogether a pleasant walk. Met the Postman, twice; the first time he gave me a letter from C.F. who comes tomorrow. ― 2ndly  ― from J. Hutchinson, who is going to be married, ―― to a Miss Murdoch ― cousin of G. Parry. I hope, & I think, he will be happy: he well deserves to be so, if trying to do a man’s best in life be a desert. ― Came back & dined at the Sussex Hotel. ―

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1861, Diary Entry

Wednesday, 25 September 1861

O bad! ― and such a day! All through, black clouds & pouring beating rain & hail!

Packed 6 packages, & should have sent them to town, but it rained so. ― Dawdled, & read, & wrote, but the least possible of all. At 3 letters from J. Simeon, who is to marry again, Lord Colville’s sister, I am glad of it; he is the kindliest of human beings & could never be happy unmarried. ― And from Jambo: dear good Jamie. And now I half intend to go to Littlegreen once more ― despite expense.

George Middleton came ―: that man is a good man: &, altho’ he says no, ― a philosopher. It is a pleasure to shew him paintings, as it was to dear old Col. Leake. ―― Walked with him to Warrior Square, ― intending to go on to the Fowlers, but it was late, & violent rain at times.

At 6 went up to the Crakes. ― Edward came, Mr. Harness ― & Van: ― & the little dinner party was really pleasant & jovial. ――

Dear old Mr. Crake grows far feebler daily.

At 9.30 he went to bed. Edward, V. & M.A. went to a dance. ― I & Mr. H. sate with Mrs. C. for a time, & then I walked to the Sussex with Mr. H. Vastly silly he is ― He “hoped the aristocracy would send no more pictures to popular exhibitions, ― why should they?” ――

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1861, Diary Entry

Tuesday, 24 September 1861

Very fine at sunrise: clouds at 8. utter gloom at 10, & violent atmospheric behavior all day ἔπειτα. ((Afterwards.))

Breakfast. No letters. ―

Worked ― a very little at Petraja, & Athos ―― & packed, finally 6 packages.

1 large black box
2 case of frames
3 do.
4 do.
5. Easel
6. Wooden case of drawings

Read Trollopes ― 3 clerks: ― & packed at intervals. At 3 letter from T. Fairbairn: very nice & kind.

At 4.15 went out, called at V. Crakes ― no one in, but the baby: ― (I wonder why I love children so.) But I heard Mr. C. was worse, & called there. Saw M.A.C. The old gentleman had fallen, when left alone last night for a minute ― & they seem all thoroughly alarmed: they have changed his bedroom to downstairs, but still he is out with Mrs. C. to day.

I wish Edward were come. ― M.A.C. says he cries bitterly, at the prospect ―― so clear his mind ―― of leaving them all. ― (My dearest Ann did not so: she had a wider faith in a greater God.) ――― But this is very affecting & sad.

I then went to G. Middletons ― & saw all 3 ― père, mere, fils: & not without pleasure. ―― Then to the Fowlers’ ―: Mrs. F.’s servant, (Mrs. F. the elder,) has come down: but there is no help for the boy Alfred, who, by the last letter, is sinking. ――― After that, (I had met Mr. Whitmore & G.S.,) walked to the W. Scrivens ― where there was a kindly welcome & nice dinner. Capt. & Mrs. Dalrymple ― made 8. ―

Sang: as did Capt. D. ― & boisterous wind notwithstanding, returned home by 11.30.

XX

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1861, Diary Entry