Monthly Archives: February 2011

Thursday, 28 February 1861

Cedars.

Fine. Hardly any work done ― yet some.

C.F. came, & breakfasted solo ― at 10:30. ― Then Mrs. Malcolm, & Miss M. ― the latter a bore: then Genl. M. ― Later Edwd Crake. ― And later, Lady Waldegrave, & little Constance Braham. Lady W. was extremely nice, & so natural.  ― At 4.30 walked across to Croydon □, & left a card at Cosways: ― called also at M. Milnes’s ― & on Lady James. At 7 to Mr. Morier’s. ―

Extremely pleasant party. ―

1861-02-28

The whole evening was charming ― current, lively: what grave converse there was was real & good: & no end of fun: ἒπειτα, μεν, εκαμε καλλίζην μουσικὴν, ἠ κυρία Λεῦτπολδ, κανείς δὲ ετραγούδησε. ((Then Mrs. Leutpold played beautiful music, but no one sang (NB).))

καὶ ἐπιζρέψε εἰς τὰς ἒνδεκα. ((And came back at eleven (NB).))

Letters, from J. Hutchinson: ― Geoff Hornby: & Ann.

Penrhyn ― (I asked at Mrs. E. Stanley’s,) is no better.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Wednesday, 27 February 1861

Cedars.

Fine. ― After breakfast, J.B.E. came ― & thereby lots of talk. He has really thrown up his appointment, &, as the Hunter’s have their house full, will go to Lpool tomorrow. He seems to hesitate about Corfû & Aldershot ―: I think, if the thing is to be broken off ― the furthest ˇ[off] he goes & ˇ[for] the longer time ― the better. It is a miserable affair altogether.

After he went came C. Fortescue: ― & after him, the Fergusson: who looked at pictures & sketches for an hour. Worked ― but only by fits at the Cedars. I greatly wish I were away, & had some thorough change.

Then restessness: sleep. X. X

Later, worked a little: & at 4.30, came Mrs. J. Godley ― (& Dennis Godley,). ― But I did not go out at all, ― morning up & down the rooms, & I wish I had music of some sort to play.

So I dined at home on cold beef & beer. Came letters ― (wh. I answered,) from Leycester Penrhyn: ― Mr. Penrhyn is dying, ― it was in 1835 ― 26 years ago ― he took me to Ireland.

And from Mrs. Clive ―――― Maria Cosway has a daughter. ―

Poor James Edwards’ affairs make me sad. And my own ain’t particular shiny.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 26 February 1861

Cedars of Lebanon

Lightish, brightish. ―― Foord’s men came & fixed in the Bethlehem & Interlaken & [seamed] & moved the Lebanon. Worked off & on ― but was not well, & slept a good bit. John Blencowe came. ― Later Sir Walter & Lady James, both whom were very nice & pleasant. She is assuredly a delight. ― At 4.30 walked to Mrs. E. Stanley’s: ― Mr. Penrhyn is worse. ― Had hair cut: Fearon there. ― Home to dress & at 7.30 to Sir Walter James.

But I found at home a most grievous & sad letter from J.B.E. ― who has thrown up his appointment & is going into foreign service! Nothing has vexed me as much for a long time.

Sir W.’s dinner was really pleasant

1861-02-26

Gladstone was really charming ― talked of Corfû ― & Athens, &c. After dinner music: ἀλλὰ δὲν ἐτραγούδισα ἐγὼ. ((But I did not sing (NB).)) ― Called at James’s club ― not there: at his lodgings ― but found him asleep: so I left a card only.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Monday, 25 February 1861

Beirût.

More or less dark all day. ― Worked a little at Beirût, & ceased for the present, ― replacing it above the chimney, & the Damascus below: removing also all the other easels & tables. Mrs. & Miss Clarke came, no one else; but G. Middleton after I had gone out, & R. Martineau when I came back at 6.30. Besides these, Daddy Hunt for a short time.

Letter from P. Williams.

Walked to Belgravia at 4.30 ― called on Buxtons, E. StanleysLushington’s & Clives. ― At Mrs. Stanleys, the servant gave me a very bad account of Mr. Penrhyn, ― so I called on Col. Hornby ― fearing he might hear suddenly of his death. ― Returned ― to dine at home.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Sunday, 24 February 1861

Wet all day. … T. Woolner came to breakfast ˇ[― very pleasant all,] & staid till 1. ― Rain ―. Called on Mr. Fergusson ― a very marvellous man. Then on Cockerells ― at dinner ― & did not go in. Mrs. Martineau. F.W. Gibbs ― & walked with him to Prince’s Gate. S. Guerneys ― & their house. ― Dr. LushingtonFairbairn, & Evans ― left cards. ― home by 7.

At 7¾ to Carlton Gardens: ― Mr. H. as young & well as if he were 40 ἀντὶ ((Rather than (NB).)) 76. Lady W. well ― but it appeared to me ― I had written an over long letter. Anyhow she was “fine” ― & I became glum. Genl. & Mrs. Malcolm. H.J. GenfellBidwell ˇ[C. Braham] ― & a younger Peel: besides the 2 Miss Moneys. I sate between Peel & Bidwell, & was bored to death. The upper part of the table’s converse was utter frivolity. ―

In the evening Miladi talked wholly to Bidwell & Grenfell. I ― to Mrs. Malcolm.

The conventional tone of these castes extremely disgusts me. C. Braham is evidently ill & cross: ― & the whole thing seems to me crooked. ―

Επερηπατησα ‘ς τῆν οἱκεῖον ‘ς τὰς δέκα ὣρας. ((I walked home at 10 o’clock (NB).))

X

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 23 February 1861

Beirût.

Perfectly dark ― if darkness be perfection.

Intanto ((Meanwhile.)) ― this drives me wild.

Work being impossible, I went in a cart to Foords, Bickers, & Robersons.

Pouring rain. Came back & worked a little at Beirut. Slept.

X

Col. Hornby came: ― it is sad to see him, so aged, & so unoccupied. Penrhyn I fear is dying. ―

Later, James Edwards ― who is in better phase. He has been to Lady T. Leavis ― & is to go to Lady Palmerston’s to night. All this is right, as he has decided to stay here. I cannot altogether make out Miss L.’s views towards him ― or probably she can’t herself: yet I suppose by all this, that they give him a chance willingly.

Dined at the W. Beadons ― only W.F.B., & Mrs. B. he is sadly ill. She, better than usual. ―

He is also greatly excited & angry at times, & one sees that she suffers in many ways. ―

Small annoyances have had little hold on me lately, ― but a twice sent bill is one, ― & such came in to day. But I found it paid in Hansen’s book ― luckily. ―

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 22 February 1861

Beïrût.

Very fine. Worked ― scantily at Beirût, for the Evans’s came ― & bought Interlaken: ― then Henry & Ernest Bunsen ― then Brant of Damascus ― & then one Mr. Crowley from Gould, whom I gave advice to anent Hotels &c. in Rome. ― Later Mrs. Ernest & Mary (Battersby) Bunsen, ― who is if possible more an angel than of old: ― and Charles & Mrs. WeldMiss Simpkinson & Agnes Weld, ― & then Augustus & Mrs. Egg. So I did not get much work done, although the Beirût does progress, however slowly. At 6.15 walked to Digby Wyatts’, ―

1861-02-22

A most charming evening wholly. ― The Digby Wyatts themselves there is no need of praising. Ferguson is delightful from fun as well ˇ[from] as [sic] every kind of knowledge: Russell & Thornton both intellectual. Afterwards I sang 6 or 7 songs.

Found a note from Evans ― & the 126£ for the Interlaken.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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