Monthly Archives: September 2010

Sunday, 30 September 1860

Wonderfully fine! clear, gold & green, deep-shadowed & brightly lighted October morning! ― Rose at 6½. Wrote to C.F.J. Edwards, ― Emily Tennyson, ― George Kokali, ― Holman Hunt, & Ann. Walked a little: & what deep strange delight in the morning air & sun, ― & bird singing, & tree rustling freshness!!! ― Breakfast ― afterwards, at 11.30 walked to Ockham, reaching it at 1.40 ― by the red sandy Surrey roads, & heathy wideness. Lonely are those heaths!

From Weybridge to Ockham ― 7 miles at least, ― I saw but 2 individuals ― one lame, & carrying broken umbrellas ― the other gloomy ― sitting on a wayside heap of stones. At Ockham by lunch time ― the cheerful Doctor, & kindly sister in law: ― William L. Mrs. Russell, & one of her boys ―: Miss L. & another daughter I had never seen. A truly charming family. ――

At 3.30 ― walked homewise with W.L. thro the grounds ― badly laid out, of C. Buxton. And so to the Hotel by 6. ――

Dinner: ― pretty tolerably pleasant, yet rather a bore ― particularly from the queer washed-out man who would come & talk to me after all was over.

X12

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 29 September 1860

Cedars ― day 1

Rose at 6. Some Plato ― ˇ[drawing S. Sabbas till 8.30.] Not raining, but very dark, & “promising rain.” ― Breakfast: & found, by a note from Mr. Lyle, that my “miniature” had arrived. ―

Went to the “Temple” & saw it [].

Returned, & took all the colours &c. &c. ― there ― & hired a small boy ― one Norman, ― for 6d a day ― to attend me.

Then, about 12 ― got the canvass up ― & Messrs Lyle & Hewitson, (the latter carrying water,) came. ―

And so I really got to work, & absolutely painted in all the sky, & much of the rough tree work before 5 ― after which it was time to go. A small walk ― & then dinner. Sate next the intelligent doctor, ― his name is Mac Clair I think. ―

Came upstairs at 9: spite of hints & persuasions.

Letters to-day, from W.N. & C.F. =

The waiter who cut the goose for 15 persons ― the last 3 ― of whom I was the 18th gooseless! ― And his apology to me! ―

His convulsion shying the plate away ― when the small boy asked him ― who for? ― ‘Henny-body!’ ―

X

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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I have updated the post for 23 September 1860 adding the Greek transcript and translation, a well-known anecdote about Lady Waldegrave.

Many thanks to Nina Bouri, who has volunteered to help with the Greek.

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Friday, 28 September 1860

Rose at 6. Better health. A little Plato, ― Republica. Dark gray morning… Began to work hard on Musters’ Lebanon. ……

At 8½ breakfast down stairs: ― very good.

Room not done ― talk with Ingine Ossifer ―: & to Mr. Lyle himself ― who is really good natured. ― To Hewitson’s, whose room, house, & grounds, are a very exquisite specimen of taste. Hewitson has no imagination, but great taste & tact, & good breeding, & it is impossible not to recall days when these qualities so allured me, who then had little chance of such society. The great Cedars were glorious: ― but by this ― 11 A.M. ― it began to rain, & thenceforth, rained on in utter gloom till 5 P.M.

Meanwhile, I worked on, hard, ― & cheerfully ― all day. ― At 5, walked to “the Temple” again ―― no canvass yet. ― Returned, & Table d’hôte at 6¾. ― Sate next a clever medical man, who, talking of John Leech, went on to speak of the Greeks understanding Anatomy ― which he declared they didn’t, & I nearly agreed with him eventually. ―

At 9.30 came upstairs & shall now draw for an hour ― piuttosto ((Or rather.)) ― “pen-out.” ―

Embassy at 10 from “Ladies” below for me to play & sing: no go.

Sewed on a button.

X11

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Thursday, 27 September 1860

Fine: & not so cold. ―

After breakfast ― worked an atom on the oil Parnassus, & then sent away Church’s 2 drawings.

Packed, & arranged rooms. ――

At 2 “peeped” at  Mrs. Beadon & children ― & returned to “pack” finally, & off by cab to Rail. Arrived at 4 just in time.

4.30 at Walton. Fly to Hotel. ― it all seems very bright & coleur de rose. ― Walked to “the Temple” ― but my canvass “was not there.”

Back, & put rooms in order. ―― (as if one were to stay 500 weeks!) ― the sunset & Cedars are beautiful. ― Room very nice. ― Dinner at 6¾. Jocose parties ― very tolerable. Indian Ossifers ― &c. & Merecantile jollities. ― Cooking così. ((So so.)) ― Wine good. ― Tried “reading room[”] afterwards ―――: old lame lady hobbled across to me ˇ[(I thought she was going to offer me a religious tract)] ― “sit still Sir! for God’s sake don’t rise Sir! ― I only wanted to see if you was anybody I knew!” ―― But, as she stared me in the face I had been obliged to rise. ― So I came upstairs.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Wednesday, 26 September 1860

Fine. Rose at 6.30. Wrote to Mrs. G. Clive.

Letters from F.L. C.M.C. (20£) ― Bright, & F. Catt.

Ann came at 11 ― & stayed till 5: ― she seems better, yet not well.. ― the day was pleasant ― & we dined at 2. I worked a good deal at the oil Damascus. Mrs. Prinsep came, but I couldn’t see her. ――― At 6, went to Penry Williams, who goes on well (J. Gibson, who went by rail to Chichester, & overshot it: & at Portsmouth insisted on seeing the Cathedral!)

Came away at 8.30. P.W. hopes to go next week.

Sent off the Cedars to Oatlands to-day.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 25 September 1860

Dull, very dark, & more or less drizzle all day till 3. ― Worked a little at oil Damascus.

At 12 called on P. Williams: he is better.

Foords ― ordering the Cedar canvass to Oatlands.

Drummond’s ― meeting & walking with Digby Wyatt some way.

Dents ― to pay for a watch.

Then to Brompton ― tired.

Marion, Laura, Sidney: ― & then I sate till 6 with poor Fanny Coombe, who however goes on well. ―

Percy came, & Allen & Genést ― 2 boarders ― & then dinner. ― All very nice & pleasant.

They are a good lot of children.

Sang afterwards, & sate again with Fanny C. ―

Took away the Knowsley birds, ― & Damascus saddles, & home in a cab by 10.30. ―

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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