Monthly Archives: February 2010

Wednesday, 29 February 1860

Sent letters to Dickenson & R. Fowler.

Very fine ― & !!!!!!!! warm!!!! ―

But I was thoroughly cold & very unwell: throat & chest bad.

Worked at Gibbs’s Cervara all day ― 9 to 5, but extremely unable to sit.

At 4½ Wilson came, but Asthma prevented my speaking much. Apropos of Rome, he told McPherson that I thought Miss Ironside had better study nature & not Titian!! ―― Walked alone to S. Agnese ― the mountains very lovely  . ―

1860-02-29

But unwell. ― Dined alone. Worked on Musters Philæ.

Sent letters to R. Fowles, ― & to Dickenson ― ordering a paper to be sent somehow ― for I can get none here.

It is not easy to think HOW I can get through 2 more whole months in this very odious place.

Throat bad ― & cold worse. Had a fire lit in my bedroom.

X11

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 28 February 1860

Sent letter to Musters.

No sleep ― frightful tempest of wind: I had to rise & wake Giorgio, to shut all the shutters.

Rose late: cold & cough bad, very unwell all day.

X10

Letter from Lady Bethell.

Worked pretty hard at times,: (at others slept,) at the Cerbara.

Dined alone ― not going out at all.

Worked at Church’s Dead Sea afterwards.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Monday, 27 February 1860

Again horrible weather: pitch dark at times, then cold rain & high wind (for Rome ―) & general filth. ― “Non z’e rimedio” ((There’s nothing to do.)) as G. says: who is more cheerful, & gets on with his writing & accounts.

Sat to work at Gibbs’s Cerbara, & worked hard, tho’ often leaving off from want of light. At 3 E. Wilson came & at 3½ we went to Gibson. The statues of Venus & Pandora are the most ludicrously shocking!

― Then to Dessoulany ― who was in: & very happy: & his Campagna paintings are the best after all. ―

Then P. Williams, who was kindly: pleasant as always. Then to Miss Ironside ― a Sydney artist: odd & interesting ― but I could see nothing original in her work. ―
Then to Coleman, who poor fellow was ill, but cheery: his Campagna, ― all but colour, ― is perfect, in representing actual rural life. ― Mrs. C. is very nice always ― & wonderfully beautiful still. ―

Edward Wilson is a highly interesting man,  I shall be very sorry when he goes. ―

Came home before 6 ― after a walk on the Pincian: ― gray dark howling dismal. ― dined alone. ―

και ήρθε κανείς ((And nobody came (GT).)) ― Throat & cold bad.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Sunday, 26 February 1860

Slept better; cold somewhat better. ― Fine, & cold. Sent G. early with a note to Mrs. Story. ―

More people at church. Mr. Burgon the ˇ[new] Chaplain: 6 French Protestants soldiers. ― Called on Cheales ― ill in bed. Lord. R. & the Oxford Militia man ―.―

At 1½ to Wilsons, & with him in carratella to Doria Pamphili Gardens. ― but the sun had clouded & day was cold. Yet the gardens are ever interesting to me from many causes besides the elegant Villa & gardens & swans & pines.

Returned by Acqua Paolina. ― Dressed, & by 6 to Macbeans. ― Mr. Bilton, Newton, Dr. O’Brien & myself, guests. Dinner superexcellent: discussion on art ― sculpture especially ― & N. came out well I thought: only, at his saying ― “take for example Shakespeare, ― yet do not ask are there any Lears & Hamlets walking now in real life” ―― when, Col. G. saying quietly ― “here is Lear.” ― everyone laughed & the whole subject blew up. ― In the drawing room the conversation was always agreable, & certainly Mrs. M. is a very nice woman in all ways. ― Letter from Thackeray &c. ― Talk of the state of things here. They actually did send the public executioner on to the P. Pia in the Carnival, & he narrowly escaped with life. Goyon ((Count de Goyon was the head of the French occupation army in Rome.)) has had a process verbal of this. In other ways, they do all to compel the people to revolt & row.

― Went at 10½ to Cheales, but he was better & out. Saw Lord R.: who is [ετζι κ ετζι] μου φαινεται. ((So so [Lear probably meant έτσι ώστε] it seems to me (GT).))

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 25 February 1860

Sent letter to F.L.

Very fine ― clear, but colder.

Once more to Cerbara [sic], starting at 8½ ― & there by 10½. Drew badly & blackly & wearily. ―

But somehow today was not unpleasant.

My cold however became much worse, ― & the dim home was painfullish. ―

Invitation from Mrs. Story to breakfast tomorrow to meet Mrs. B. Stowe. No go. ― Dessoulany had called. Dined alone. Cold too bad to work. ―

Cheales came: he is afraid for C. Massingberd, also ― ――

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 24 February 1860

Sent letter to A. E. Tennyson.

Very fine. We packed & were off at 9½ ― & ― (roads dreadful!) at Cervara grottoes by 11½. ― There I worked tooth & nail at 2 views, till 4. ― ―

home by 6. ―

Dined alone, & penned out till 11 from 7½ ― writing first to F.L.

Mr. Wilson came ― & took on hisself [sic] to lecture me for not going out, overwork, Hugh Miller &c. &c. ―: to which I thought ― o ass! ― but said nothing. ―

My bad cold in eyes & head not improved by the day’s work.

X9

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Thursday, 23 February 1860

Bad night. No rest. ―

Fine early, & half thought of going to Cervara, but it clouded, & I was too cold & unwell. Worked hard therefore all day at Beirut, & 3 Parnassusses. ― At 5 a letter from F.L. A.T. may yet come. ― Walked into the Borghese, & over the Pincian. Dined alone: & suddenly began Musters’s Interlaken, at wh. I worked on till 11 no one coming.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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