Monthly Archives: June 2013

Tuesday, 30 June 1863

Rose at 6. ― or 6.15 ― & penned out till 8.

No one came all day ― except Clowes & Okeover. & later, Capt. Wade-Browne ― who bought another drawing. Mainly I penned out at intervals ― but very wearily. There was a vast breakfast given by Lady Anne Beckett wh. filled the place with carriages & noise.

At 7 ― I walked out nearly up to the top of Portland Place: very giddy as yet.

Passed the house of dear old Col. & Mrs. Leake: ― sad.

Returned before 8.

Dined ― Mrs. Cooper cooks nicely.

Afterwards ― wrote a little.

Bed at 10 ― or 10.20.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Monday, 29 June 1863

Fine all day.

Rose at 5 ― & penned out till 8.

Finished ― (but not satisfactorily ―) Lawsons Butrinto.

Off & on penned all day.

Came
Mrs. Wyatt
Constant Wyatt
Rev. Adam Fairbairn
W. Nevill ― sad & agitated, for Benj. N. has had a paralysis.
Sir R. Walpole} ― anti ministerial.
Lady Walpole}
Miss Walpole}
Rev. ― Walpole}
James Foster. ― very tiresome.
J. Dunn-Gardiner ― agreable & kindly.
Mrs. Prescott ― very kind.
Miss Spring-Rice, very pretty.
Alfred Drummond: pleasant
Percy Coombe ― a good lad.
T. Ashton Esq. (who bought the Baalbec & Argos.[)] ―
Mrs. Ashton ―
& S.W. Clowes, always kindly.

I could not resolve to go out, so dined at 7.30 ― on cutlets & boiled rice pudding.

But nothing removes my sadness. It is dreadful: & this life is impossible ― staying ― hard=working all day ― awaiting for comers ― never going out ― hearing the dim roar of the distant streets ―― only seeing those who come for a few minutes, no freedom, no air, ― no light, ― no friendliness. Better remain abroad wholly. Worst of all is the [mortal] folly of supposing Giorgio ill or dead: ― it has often happened so before, but still weighs senselessly on me ― without a shadow of foundation.

This penning out ― & journals! The task seems too long.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Sunday, 28 June 1863

Rose before 6. Bright morning. Penned out till 9.

Wrote to Lady Wenlock.

At 10 ― dear good S.W. Clowes came. Dr. Strange’s letter went to John Clowes ― so was 2 days later to Sam ― who got my own note on the same day: otherwise he would have set out to Turin at once! ― He brought me a large [][1] box full of Woodhouse Eaves Roses. Best of all ――――― but ― σιωπῶμεν![2]

He staid till nearly 1. ― Afterwards I wrote: journals, &c. &c. &c. ―

Later, S.W. Clowes came again, with.
Mr. Okeover ―
T. Wyatt. ― (who bought the Janina[)]
F.W. Gibbs &
Vaughan Johnson.
Admiral Robinson, (who bought the S. Salvador,) &
Mrs. Robinson.
Miss Julia Goldsmid,
& Mrs. Naylor. all very pleasant & kind visits.
afterwards ― Sir Francis Goldsmid.
Archibal Peel.

At 6.30 ― semi dressed, & at 7. absolutely went out to dine at Fairbairns. Bore the cab=journey well ― & found the kind Fairbairns as ever ― & the 2 children more delightful than ever if possible.

1863-06-28

Discussions on art. Good ― but not extensive dinner.

Old Mr. F. is a Jewel ― Mrs. T.F. is a delight. T.F. is a brick. Left at 10.45 ― & found a cab[.] Home & bed ― 11.30.


[1] One blotted word, which I think is “hat.”

[2] We keep quiet (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Saturday, 27 June 1863

Health somewhat better ― day finer. Rose at 5.30 ― & penned till 8. Breakfast.

Penned out more or less all day.

Came ―
Edgar Drummond, always delightful.
Holman Hunt}
Bob Martineau}
Col. Campbell, a gt. Pleasure to see him again.
Mrs. Cave. ― took away the Nile drawing.
Penry Williams ― wonderfully well & jolly.
F. Lushington. Staid an hour ― a good lad.
George Middleton. Long accounts of poor dear Mrs. Leake’s death ―. Who did not know her danger at all.
T. Fairbairn ― who bought 3 drawings.
J. Edwards ― going to Japan next month!

He staid till 7.30[.]

Dined. ― & afterwards wrote & penned a little but fell asleep. ― Bed at 10.45.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Friday, 26 June 1863

Dull dark warm. rain at 7. Rose at 4, & penned out till 8[.]

Not very well all day. Toothache. ―

Foord’s men finished putting up all the drawings[.]

Sir J. Reid came, & staid a long time. I was very glad to see him.

T.G. Baring came ― always kindly & good[.]

Capt. Wade-Browne came, & took away his 2 drawings. By the wonderfullest good luck I had been working all day at intervals to finish Lawson’s Gastouri from his drawing, & did so, just as Wade-Browne called! A nice cheery fellow. Worked till 7. Wrote many letters.

Dined at 7.30.

Letters from E. Drummond, Drummonds (The Duchess of St. Albans has paid me,) Mrs Evans, & W. Nevill.

Wrote to the Duchess ― & Mrs. Rawson. ―


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Thursday, 25 June 1863

Fine & warm ― muggy all day.

Rose at 6 ― & wrote lots of notes.

Breakfast at 8: near & nice as usual.

Dickenson & 3 men came, & set up the Cedars ― rehung the Masada, & pasted & framed all the Corfu drawings.

Fortescue came. Kind as ever & happier.

J. Chaworth Musters came ― kindly.

later, Lady Goldsmid: & afterwards
Ralph Nevill.

Wrote many notes, & saw to the arranging of the room all day long. ―


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Wednesday, 24 June 1863

Very fine & warm ― thunder in the evening.

Rose at 5.30: feeling always stronger & better: thank God.

Breakfast at 7.40 ― after walking on the beach. ― This Hotel is excellent in all ways. Paid bill, & came to Station, & at 9. off. ― Agreable fellow traveler ― one Mr. Mowatt,[1] formerly M.P. for Cambridge. London at 12.30.

Drove to Jones’s & ordered clothes: ― Robersons, & ordered colors. Bickers & Bush ― books. & Foords. ―

At Stratford Place by 1.30. T. Cooper chubby & pleased to see me ― & rooms all in good order.

Saw Mr. Gush. ― Set to work to unpack ― & Dickenson came, & staid till 7 fixing in the Watercol. drawings in their frames. It really seems odd, having had them so recently at Corfû! Franklin Lushington called: & Chichester Fortescue: ― how kind of both. Lunch, chops & beer.

All the afternoon went in “making up” the rooms, & by 7 I had them all in order ― & all the drawings of the 6 Islands awaiting.

At 7. Dickenson went. The cedars are to be [framed] tomorrow.

Dined at 7.30 ― roast fowl ― potatoes & peas ― & beer. ―

Wrote many notes. Looked over drawings.

Altogether ― am most thankful & very happy.

Bed. 10.30.

X

 


[1] Francis Mowatt was elected Whig MP for Cambridge in 1854.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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5 June – 23 June, 1863

There are no entries in Edward Lear’s diaries from 5 June to 23 June. See you here on 24 June!

I’ll use this break to post a few previously unpublished letters Lear wrote to Italian correspondents on the Blog of Bosh.

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Thursday, 4 June 1863

Wind ― (bright) all day, but less than yesterday.

Medicine at 5. Rose & packed [immensely], nearly concluding all by 10 ― or 10.30 ― when breakfast.

Afterwards went to Courage’s & drew 50£. Then to Mrs. Boyds, De Veres ― Craven, Lady Woolff ― & Clarks. And about 3 ― to the Kokali house, where I saw all the family, the good old Βασίλια ― Σπίρο ― Χριστὸς ― Τατιανὲ & Καραλάμπι, with Τεόδορος ― really a fine child. Nicolo I am sorry to hear is not going on well.† ― Returned by 4 or 5 ― calling at the 6th ― & seeing Harrison & others: then writing till 6.30 ― or 7.

Dressed, & to the Palace. Being before time, I stood in the Gallery ― the large dark Acacias deep brown against the gray citadel & the far purple hills.

Came a world of strangers

1863-06-04

Dinner & wines most illustrious. Balcony afterwards. Talking of women, the Senior Captain said

“The Enγlish woman, she conserve her aperients Galship, if even she have antics.”

The Enslighwoman preserves the appearance of yourh, even if she be growing old.

† i.e. he runs away from school.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Wednesday, 3 June 1863

Sitting on deck all night, nervous & irritable beyond belief, the Steamer pitching violently always. At 1 ― Paxõ was visible, & at 2 we were passing those isles, now so well-known. At 3 ― the sea was smooth ― below Capo Bianco ― the moon sank in mist, & soon the daylight crept above “Suli’s dark rock.” ― By 4 ― all the well known hills were seen, & by 5.30, we anchored below Fortress. Very little difficulty in getting ashore, & none at the Dogana, but I had to wait on the stairs, for I had forgotten my key, & had sent G. to Spiro: ― who, however, was here all the while, & had got my breakfast things ready, but had gone to bed again. From 7.30 to 9 ― unpacked ― & washed ― & then breakfast. After which I went to sleep (XX) Parcel ― a Τρäίστα from Τζερίγο, with a kind note from Bulwer, ― & invite to dine at the Palace today. Meanwhile, I was hardly ashore, when the wind rose, & became the fearfullest storm I have seen here ― the whole harbour being a rolling sheet of foam, & the wind tremendous. Read lots of Papers. Sir C. Eardley is dead. At 5.30 or later went to De Vere’s, & saw them, as well as a room full of people. Saw dear little Mary D.V. also, & came away. Called on Middleton ― out: ― & going to Mrs. Boyd met B. with whom walked till late, & had to run home to dress. Scamper at 7.30 to Palace. Only Sir H.J. & E. Baring there. Sir H. ― not as merry as usual. The acceptance of the Gk. Throne seems fixed ― & one’s impression is that the Islands will be ceded immediately: ― & our occupation end by the end of the year.

Much talk with Sir H., & also heard E. Baring play on his new piano: wh. cost 100£. ― His progress in execution is surprising, but in pathos he is wanting[.]

Home by 10.30 ―. The wind is gone down somewhat, but still blows. I shall give up all idea of going by the Atlas tomorrow ― & try the Italian boat of Friday. ―

――――

(Left out. At 3.45. I pack up what is left, & am thankful to God for having had 8 weeks of constant pleasure & improvement.)


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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