Monthly Archives: August 2013

Monday, 31 August 1863

Rose before 6 ― & penned more outlines for Lithography ― finishing the 19th by 1. P.M.

Wrote to Mr. Baring ― declining Norman Court.

Placed lithographic stones in readiness in Gush’s ground-floor studio.

S.W. Clowes called: he marries ˇ[Hon.] Adelaide Cavendish in November.

Put the tracing of No. 11. Sappho’s Leap on the stone ― by 5. P.M.

At 6 ― cab to 1. Trafalgar Square. ―

1863-08-31

Percy Coombe has gone all awry somehow, & I am in fear for his future days.

Cab home by 10. ―

XX


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Sunday, 30 August 1863

Rose before 6. ― Penned out.

Expected Penry Williams, but he did not come till after breakfast: he went away at 12. He is always the same even & quiet man. ―

I wishes I was Tekel! i.e. that my Lithographs were done: ― & I don’t yet guess how I can get through all of them, being as it were, imprisoned thus.

Wrote ― & coloured a dozen sets of drawings till 3 or 4 ― when I moved out. London is dull enough now anyhow. Called at Lord Westbury’s, & Mrs. Crakes: poor Mr. C. is the same ― perhaps only a little weaker.

At 7.15 at Admrl. Robinsons ― with 2 folios of Albanian sketches.

1863-08-30

Always pleasant. Home by 11.

Gray parrot, ― left in kitchen: on coming upstairs ― constantly repeats, whenever the bell is rung ― “O! Damn that bell! There it goes again!!” ――


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Saturday, 29 August 1863

Rose at 6. Penned till 8.

Breakfast ― & penned out till 10. or 11.

Dickenson came, to whom I paid 56£ & so am quits of his big bill ― a reward of the last winter’s toil.

All the rest of the day went in making tracings reduced outlines ― for the Lithographs of the 20 Ionian drawings. ―

At 6.50 or 7 to Admiral Robinsons ―

1863-08-29

I had taken 2 folios of drawings to show them ― & it was a great pleasure to do so.

Came away at 11 in cab.

Inspector of schools asks ˇ[rural] boys ― “what is the pestilence that walketh in darkness.[”] ―

All are silent, till the last, who says ― “[Plaise, Zir], it mun be a boog ― leastwise a flea.” ―


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Friday, 28 August 1863

Rose before 6. Not clear-headed, though.

Penned out ― off & on till noon.

Afterwards, ― made outlines of the 20 Ionians. ― this till 6. ― when I cabbed to D. Wyatt’s.

Dinner ―

1863-08-28

Wonderfully “nice” & pleasant ― & so was the evening afterwards.

Thunderstorm & rain ―: home in cab, by 11.30.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Thursday, 27 August 1863

Rose at 6.30: ― & packed ― packetissimously. ――

No letters ―, from 9 ― to 11― Mr. Bell, Mrs. Oldham & I, gathered flowers for a [glass]:[1] ― this, we arranged χωρὶς[2] Mrs. Bell, & danced there-a-round. Very happy moments.

Kind people.

At 11.15. came away, with the 1 horse carriage & old John: ― who said when I got out at Alton ― “I hope you will come again soon to us.” ― The individual characteristics of dear Mr. Bell are indeed great: ― & all the village look up to him. ― Nothing can be funnier than this ― that Mr. B. sticks by Divine Right &c. ― whereas the real Divine man, i.e. the Parson, ― is as nil by Mr. B. who don’t anyhow “agree with him” ― & is indeed totally his superior.

By 3. I was at “Waterloo Station” ― & so to Stratford Pl.

Dined ― at 6 ― 8 ― & wrote a bushel of letters. ―

 


[1] Blotted.

[2] Without.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Wednesday, 26 August 1863

Rose at 7. ― gray ― rainy ― damp. Prayers & breakfast.

Letter from T.G. Baring, very nice ― & from George Cartwright ― also nice & kind.

Mrs. B. won’t “let us be.”

(Clerical stories ― how little parsons are understood.

1. Archdeacon …… preaching in another man’s pulpit, the owner said he didn’t preach plain, & instanced the word ― “essentials” of religion ― as in point. Whereon, the Archdeacon appealing to the Shoemaker of the village & asking him what essentials meant ― “O yes Sir ― “Pigs in’ards.

Another ― a sailor ― declared how delighted he was with a sermon on “Mene, mene, tekel, upharsin[”] ― saying ― “I wish to God as I was Tekel Sir! ―

& a 3rd ― hearing the parson say ― “the Commentators do not agree with me” ― bought a hamper of kidney potatoes ― saying “I heard you say as the Common taters didn’t agree with you.” ――)

Permanently ― all “work” here is nil. The day was wholly ― “awfully” wet. ― pouring. We therefore sat ― (when Mrs. B. didn’t stir us ―) ― & looked at drawings ― or talked. At Lunch ― we were merry ― tho’ I confess I forced myself to be so. And again afterwards ― pouring rain, ― & converse which would have been delightful had our Hostess been tranquil.

However, reading some of Gilbert White’s unedited letters made a wholesome quiet pause. Suddenly a stranger came, ― God be thanked! ― a Mr. Harting ― naturahistorically given: ― a pleasant lad however ― & passed away a couple of hours pleasantly.

Dinner ― lively-ish: ― & tea ― ἔτζι κ’ ἔτζι. ―

Music ― Mrs. Oldham really sings well ― & is a very delightful woman in many ways.

We retire at 10.30.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Tuesday, 25 August 1863

Rose before 8. Breakfast at 8.

Letter from Miss Slater, I have left some drawings at Hastings ― hearing of which disgusts me horribly. Wrote to her, & to T. Fairbairn.

Penned out a little: a pleasant Mrs. Ansley called. ― [(]sister of Mrs. Parsons)

Sate penning out & talking with Mrs. B. ― (who, θαύμαστον,[1] sate still half an hour! ―) till 1. when Mr. Bell returned, with Mrs. Oldham ― (mother of Mrs. H. Hanson of Constantinople?) a pleasant nice woman. ―

Lunch ― in a hurry ― Mrs. B. being in a fuss. ― Afterwards Mr. B. & I walked out ― up the “Scrubs ―” wh. he has bought & turned into pleasure grounds. But it rained a good deal, & finally so hard at last that we had to return.

O pottering! always wearying me! ― We walked again, as a thunder storm cleared off all ― up the Alton Road: & returned to dine at 5.30.

1863-08-25

Dear Mr. Bell is always the same kindly man as ever. The evening would have been very delightful, as Mrs. O. sings well ― only Mrs. B. was particularly fussy ― & absurdly grotesque about Mr. B. & Mrs. O. who went to “look at the moon.”

XX

 


[1] Extraordinarily (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Monday, 24 August 1863

“Packed.” Early. Cloudy. Breakfast 9.

At 10. Left Burton in Poney chaise ―: good people are the F.’s ― but there is a something [minus]―I don’t quite know how to call it.

At Petworth, found that Petersfield was 19 miles off ― so had to take a 2-horse carriage. 1/6 a mile.

Enjoyed the drive thro’ Cowdray Park immensely ― & thought of J.S. ― days of years ago.

Near Petersfield ― stopped at B. Carters ― & lunched there. 6 children ― very nice. Walked with him; & after lunch, to Liss, where, at 3.50 ― was Mr. Bell, who drove me to Sellborne.

He & Mrs. Bell are very well: & the old place beautiful.

1863-08-24

Very pleasant evening.

Bed at 10.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Sunday, 23 August 1863

Rose late ― & did but little journal before breakfast ― but thank goodness there is but little more to do.

Breakfast ― & afterwards ― they went to church: I not. ― Wrote till 11.30. letters to Baring, Mrs. Robinson, &c. ― & journals till 1. ― At 1.30 lunch, & afterwards a séance with everybody, & all the 4 children. ― At 2.30, T. & W.F. ― I, & the 2 boys went up Barlton wood, & we all lay on the downs looking at the view for half an hour or more. Nothing could be lovelier than that view today ― so clear!

We came over the Down ― & thro’ the wood by another path. Later, I lost them by going round a bank they went down but I didn’t like to try. And so I walked home by the road, & through the beautiful Park ― by 6. ――― Wrote a little again, but dinner is earlier o’ Sundays.

1863-08-23

On the whole ― pleasantish. ―

Afterwards ― played womewhat ― but there was talking so I left off.

The curate cum σύζυγον[1] went.

Smoking room: & discussion about Religion ― Colenso ― J. Christ ― J. Smith, &c. &c. &c. ― very unprofitable & a bore.

At 11.20. we to bed came.

Write to Arthur Fairbairn.

Sat up till 12.30 & finished all the 6 Island Journals.

 


[1] His wife (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Saturday, 22 August 1863

Rose at 6. Cloudy & gray. ― Wrote Cerigo journals till 8.30 ― very cold at breakfast time.

Letters from P. Williams, & a very nice one from Mrs. Clive. Wrote to both later ― & at 12 ― retreat to room to journalize again. It has been raining more or less ― but duwnstairs, I enjoyed the quiet of the lawn & trees ― tho’ the drawing-room & all that part of the house are odious to me ― as indeed all funished houses are. Wrote till 12.20. ― Strolled in the park by the beautiful avenue ― wh. the F.s don’t seem to care for ― being all day at those wretched Ponds. Lunch ― unavailing to bring one into lively spirits. After which ― as they planned “fishing” & a late drive, ― I set off to walk μοναχῶς.[1] ― through the lovely beech wood above Duncton & onto the down. ― What recollections of every spot below! ― forty “years ago” Bignor, Rackham, Westburton ― Parham ― Amberley ― &c. &c. &c.!!! ―

――― And yet the wiser mind

Grieves less for what Time takes away, than that he leaves behind.[2]

― And there is not very much left behind methinks, for I feel very old. ― I came down to Lavington & back to Burton by 4.30. The afternoon has been sultry & gloomy ― with gleams of sun early, but latterly none. Wrote journals again from 5 to 6.15.

At 6.30 ― went out ― as the F.s had come in, & walked a bit with F. & little Flo ― to the Pond or Lake &c. &c. &c. &c.

Dinner ― 7.30. More lively & agreable ― tho’ it must be owned Mr. Murray is an awful bore. His discussions are frightful.

Played somewhat afterwards ― & sang a little. & sate with T. & W.F. till 11.15.

Wealthy is the conversation of these diggings. They talk of 20 pipes of wine ― investing 25,000 here or there &c. &c. &c.

 


[1] Alone.

[2] Wordsworth, “The Fountain” (1799).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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