Monthly Archives: November 2009

Wednesday, 30 November 1859

MR. EDWARDS

Slept well. Day fine. Cough bad. Breakfast at 8 with E. He is a very singular man indeed. Afterwards he signed the 100£ bill. Then I wrote. (Letters from Potter, Penrhyn & Bruce, all affirmative.) till Mr. & Mrs. Ferrier came, to whom I shewed drawings. They are both nice people ― she absolutely charming. It is plain that E. is a man whose temper has made him terribly feared ― & that [Jemmy] was never in the [worry]. Lunch. & later came the 2 pictures, which we got out, & they are now in the dining room.

Wrote 6 letters.

At 3½ I walked out solo, ― along the road thro’ three villages ― to, nearly, Spêke Hall ― & so returned: cold through, & dampish ― & got my throat bad, & am horribly fearful of an Asthma fit. ― Returned at 4½. And found Mr. E. there, who by detached degrees came to like the pictures enormously. ― At 6½, dinner. ― W. Sandbach, always thoroughly  amiable & completely gentlemanlike. ― Mr. Dacker or Macker ― the parish clergyman, ― fat & like J. Gould ― a gentlemanly Mr. Brownell ― of Rio Janeiro & the Pampas, Ferrier, & the most delectable Mrs. Ferrier, than whom it is not often a sweeter little woman is seen. Kind & gentle Mrs. E. sate out the dinner. ――

The whole was very pleasant & friendly

The 2 [Mallys]

After dinner I “went thro’” all the Palestine folios, & then, Mrs. F. played absolutely divinely. ―

Ποι, I sang ― with gt. effect. ―

After all went, E. talked of poor L. Parker greatly. E. is a most singular man.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 29 November 1859

MR. EDWARDS

Fine & cold after rain. Pleasant & lively breakfast: ― W.H. is a wonderful fellow. I wonder if he knows of my letters to Lord & Lady D. ― At 11 I came away with the “Caterer” a stammering & untoward sort of man, to whom I offered 2/6 for his drive, but he said “N―n―n―o ― SS―i―rr ― it’s too much ― & I don’t want it ―” but very ungraciously. ― At the Station, got my other luggage, & came in a cab to Mrs. Edwards’, seeing W. Sandbach on the road.

Mrs. E. only at home ― (& the 2 little dogs, Minnie & Monk:) ― Quiet & sickly Lady ― yet kind, ― & intelligent. ([gr.].)

Found letters from Mrs. Edwd Hornby, J. Cross, Col. Leake, Sir J. Reid, & W. Nevill ― very kind & subscribing each. ― from A. Stanley ― abrupt & disagreable ― refusing: ― & from Lord Derby ― also refusing ― & very queer. from Ann ― also ― & Daddy Hunt the good. ― Mrs. Ferrier, the extremely handsome & nice sister of J.E. came in & lunched, ― & went. After that I wrote 8 letters: ― & at 4 ― talked with Mrs. E. ― at 5 came in the fabulous E. ― looking older ― but very kind in manner. The [caressing] address of his manner is amazing, but I resolved to think only of his kindness. His vexation however at the pictures, not being arrived was very painful, & fully shared by me. ― Dinner pleasant & good ― only Mrs. E. did not eat: ― is she not like a medieval lady? Afterwards ― tea ― & singing ― & talk till 10. A most singular day in many ways. ―

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Monday, 28 November 1859

F. HOPWOOD?
COL. CLOWES

Fine day. ―

Breakfast. Off at 10½ ― intending to go to Winwick. (omitted to see Col. Clowes, & also to leave any message for him ― by being “maddled.”)

But the train was express & went straight to Lpool. ― So, leaving my things at the station, I & a trunk went to Knowsley in a cab: ― a queer set of feelings always. The W.H.s were out, so I walked to Hyton & saw all the Ashtons & J. [Winstonby] who reminded me it was 30 years since he took me to Lpool. We walked back, past the changed hall ― not outside but in.

Windham H.by ― Mrs. N. Oswald Penrhyn & Hall at dinner. Very cheerful & pleasant.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Sunday, 27 November 1859

A very fine but colder day. ―

Breakfast at 9. Letter from Foord. No Bassæ yet. Walked to Church. Dreary preacher ― one Macgrattan ― on prophecy & the W. of Babylon. Ach! It lasted 42 minutes!

Dinner at 2. ― After wh. shewed the Colonel the Palestine drawings. ― At 4 ― Tea ― & now I have been writing from 6 to 8. ― there certainly is a deep dulness [sic] in this house. ―

Supper & ditto.

X10

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 26 November 1859

F. HOPWOOD?
COL. CLOWES

Fine ― gray ― coldish.

“Packed.” ― & breakfast at 8. ― After which walked out with W. Langton ―: went to T. Potter’s ― & saw the Philæ, & the 2 pictures, Corfû & Athos, of St. Leonards’ days. ― Returned to the Langtons: the young ladies are but so so methinks ― & after Woodborough & Papplewick &c. ― things is slowish. ― Wrote to Giorgio, Spiro, & Shakespeare. ― Lunch ― & then at 2 my cab came. Left, & came to Col. Clowes. The Colonel was going out. Miss C. & I worked at sketches. Later I wrote notes, & at 6 Sam came. Oddly enough, he backed out of the Bassæ 5£ but, on my being surprised, said Yes. ― Letters from C.F. & M. Milnes subscribing. from Mr. & Mrs. Edwards, & Windham H.

At dinner, an Aunt Holden ― & a young Mr. Vavacour, ― an agent: a pleasantish quiet party ― but the party talk wholly gossip.

A gloom, insensibly pervades life here. ―

Wrote & sent letters to
Spiro
A. Stanley.
Mrs. G. Clive
Mrs. Hornby &
Sir J. Reid.

X9

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 25 November 1859

W. LANGTON

Pleasant breakfast & morning. T. Fairbairn left at 10. I wrote to 10 12 people. ―
Sir R. Bethell ― 1
Lady Bethell ― 2
Lord Derby ― 3
Lady Derby ― 4
Lord Stanley ― 5
J.B. Harford ― 6
J. Cross ― 7
E. Tennyson ― 8
Bickers & Bush ― 9
Mrs. W. Evans ― 10
Mr. Bell 11
Mrs. Bell ― 12

Dull gray day, but not cold. Walked in the garden. ― At 3½ left this beautiful house ― where I have had a most pleasant visit, & was down to W. Langtons. There were Mrs. L. ― & 2 daughters ― & 2 of Mr. Edmond’s daughters far more interesting to me. ― Bye & bye ― Arthur Heywood, & William Fairbairn ― a very nice fellow ― but sad ―: wife just dead.

Dinner pleasant ― & afterwards also.

Later I shewed Palestine sketches till 11.

The state of things between A.H. & the “deceased wife’s sister” ― is not concealed ― as why should it? being right: ― yet the consequences of this kind of excitement & delay are also plain.

A fire has made their room comfortable.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Thursday, 24 November 1859

T. Fairbairn. ―

Slept well. Fine day by a great luck. ―

This house is most beautiful. Holman Hunt & other pictures. Unpacked the Petra ― which to my delight ― F. (who is alone here,) likes greatly ― & keeps. ―

May I be thankful by acts.

Wrote all day long ― letters to 18 people. At 4½ T.F. came in & we sang & talked till 6½.

At dinner were Captn ― W. Langton, Rev. Birch ― (P. Wales 1st tutor ―) [Hon.] Rev. Ellis ― & a Mr. Pender. ―

Dinner excellent: evening & society all pleasant. Ate too much though.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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