Monthly Archives: August 2012

Sunday, 31 August 1862

Threatening rain, but rainless ― gray ― all day.

Rising at 7. writing note to Mrs. Clive, T. Cooper, & Hutton. ― At 9 ― wandering about the old rooms ― prints, miniatures, old china Turtle ― books &c.: hall ― organ, &c. &c. &c. &c. Watercloset ― [Gilleray] & Donaldson, Hottentot venuses &c. &c.

Walk in Gardens. Breakfast. Vandykes ― (one, of H. Maria, for Col. Bradyll.) Snyders, &c. &c. ― The going to Church ― old church ― pew ― service, chanted &c.: pleasant, sermon stupid. Afterwards, walk with Mr. W. immense Chestnut trees. ―

Church. ― Park again ― from 4.30. to 6. ― ―――

Dinner 6.30. Same party. Afterwards, Mr. & Mrs. Wilmot, & her brother.

Anecdote from Mr. W. of Turner.

All sung well ―

Bed at 11.30

Ἂς εὐχαριστοῦμεν τὸν θεὸν![1]

a better month ―

only 9 crosses.

 


[1] Let us thank God! (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 30 August 1862

Rose at 6. At 7 it began to rain. ― At 7.30. Breakfast at Mrs. E.’s ― by John’s case ― at 8. off in bus. 8.30. Rail to Scarborough by 9. There I went to an Inn, & got a 2nd breakfast ― waiting till rain ceased. Then I got a guide, & saw (!) Selous’s[1] picture of Jerusalem! ― After that I walked in the Spa Gardens ― really extremely splendid & beautiful: ― & all across the town to the Castle Cliff ― & back to the Railway by 1 ― where lunched, & at 2.30. off again. A dreary wet day ― & dark. At York by 4 ― & off to Normanton ― where ― at 5.11. changed, & off to Wakefield ― there by 5.30. In a fly ― off to Woolley ― & at 6.30 arrived there ― old Eliza better, woody Park ― deer &c. ― Godfrey Wentworth ― courteous: hall staircase & Library: barking dog Trap, likeness to Mr. & Mrs. W. ― Upstairs, & dressed: & dining soon. Very odd remembrances of Wilton Place, ― the world is certainly small, & time ― all time ― “only a minute.” Son ― pare, manca testa;[2] ― daughter, pleasing, & reminding me of Mary W. Dinner good & solid & pleasant: it is well to be forced to these new phases of life. Mr. W. had written again to beg me to stay over Monday ― so I must do so. Letters (from Hutton, & Mrs. Clive, the last enclosing 52.10.0.)

Henry Courtney Selous, Jerusalem in her Grandeur

Evening ― played & sang. To bed at 11.


[1] Henry Courtney Selous (1803-1890) painted two pictures of Jerusalem, “In her Grandeur” and “In her Fall” according to Selous’ Two Grand Pictures of Jerusalem. Boston: Elliot, Blakeslee & Noyes, 1872 (Goodle Books).

[2] No head, it seems.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 29 August 1862

Fine all day.

Breakfast at 9.

Shewed drawings to the E.’s & a Mrs. Akroyd, Mr. Ridgevy, & Mr. Champney. A pleasant lot.

Drew ― after lunch ― all the afternoon ― finding Miss Cautley ― & going up the cliff with her.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Thursday, 28 August 1862

[No entry.]

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Wednesday, 27 August 1862

A lovely, & very white day throughout.

Rose at 6 ― “packed.” Breakfast at 8. ― Little Algy had had the croupe but ˇ[was better.]

At 9.15 ― we were off in the “Drag” ― a mail coach ― Lord W. driving, Lady W. on the box: I, Miss C., Constance, & Caroline behind, Brilby & Aletheia, Mitchell the gardener, & 2 servants behind all. ― A pleasant drive to York. All off in Rail, & at Castle Howard Station by 10.40 ― There, some on foot, some in a bus, & so to the magnificent Castle H. ― one of the finest places I ever saw. Inside however, the rooms disappoint ― none are good: ― pictures, I had mostly seen. Then came walks in the gardens: very fine & pleasant: & at 1  ― Luncheon all together, with every variety ― (fish, chicken & beef sandwiches ―) of food ― & fun. These children are perfectly delightful, & the pranks they play, & the good humour & good sense of all is wonderful. ―

Lord & Lady W. & I walked more in the Gardens, & at 2, all off again in the bus. At 3. they all left me at the Station: a kindlier & finer lot I have not known anywhere. ―――― I had to wait till 5.15 ― & then off onward: (country grows woldy & flat ―) at 6.20 ― [Ganton] ― & at 7. Filey ― really ― pretty bay. ―

Crescent Inn ― where I could only get a room by favour; ― & where I found Mrs. Empson had called: ― tried however in vain to find her, as she had left no number. With difficulty got a dinner, the tyrannical waiter bullying me horridly. At last however, dined well. Afterwards, they brought letters from the post. Edwd. Waterton ― Mrs. Palmer, & Christopher E. ― Mrs. Empson is next room! ― So there I went & found her & Mrs. W. Rowson, & Miss Cautley ― & sate laughing & talking till 10.30.

Bed at 11.

X9


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 26 August 1862

Fine all day. ― at times gray[.]

Rose at 6. Greek till 8. Wrote an answer to Mr. Wentworth’s kind letter: & also to Mrs. C. Buxton, Mrs. G. Scrivens, & to Hutton. Breakfast: immensely pleasant: Every way. Mostly wrote till 1. Lunch: always pleasant ― the nice Caroline & sensible Aletheia, ― the good manly Brilby ― & the uncertain Constance ― the benevolent Algernon & the vivacious Dicky: Lady W. ― & Miss Cunningham.

After 3 ― Lady W. took me out to the village, & 1st we went to the Industrial school: 2nd to Infant school. 3rd a cottage with a poor old woman ― whose son & husband had died lately, & her daughter had left her (being a widow & remarrying,) with 3 children ― her grandchildren. The kindness & heartiness of Lady W. ― & her gentleness in talking to the cottagers is truly beautiful. After 1 or 2 more, we went to Stephen Lawley’s house ― & over it: & after that to the gardens where I drew “common objex” ― & so till 6.30. Lady W. is one of a many thousand. ―――

At dinner ―

Converse pleasant.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Monday, 25 August 1862

Very lovely all day ― Less bright after 12 or 1.

Rose at 6. ― Greek. At 9 ― Prayer ― alquanto si sente che manca il puntuale.[1] ―

Breakfast ― pleasant. The children are certainly a remarkable lot: so individualized & clear=cut in character. Drew from 10 to 1 ― at a Sepia drawing of Valley of Jehosaphat ― better than χθὲς.[2]

Then, shewed folios of drawings to Lady W. & the children ― whose remarx are very interesting.

At 4 ― walked out: the Gardens are delightful; ― to the [Stitting flat]: & back by 6.45.

Dinner at 8. Colonel Baker of the 8th & talk of Captain Elephant &c. ―

Bed at 12[.]

X8

 


[1] Lear must have meant: “One greatly feels a lack of punctuality.”

[2] Yesterday (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Sunday, 24 August 1862

Quite gloomy: rainy early. ― Breakfast 9½. Rose at 5.30. Greek till [9].30.

Letters from ― Miss Cleasby: the Fawkes’s are away, & from C.S.F. of ˇ[part of] which this is a copy. “My dear L. I am most thoughtful that my 1st conversations with the C.’s are over. I arrived on Wednesday (20th) & ˇ[was] as you may suppose, painfully nervous. I had first a long walk & talk with her: later a talk with him. She was comparatively mild, & hopeful about my prospects ― but warned me of the intensity of his feelings of repugnance, wh. I found too true, & I had the most painful conversation in my life ―― May I never have such another; it took the darkest view of everything; he showed an excess of dislike, & an exaggerated harshness upon both her & myself wh. was most distressing, & shocking. I am far from thinking that my conduct has been blameless, in respect of self control, self denial &c. ― but the facts of the case do not warrant, & my own conscience protests against his condemnation. It was a sore trial, but I am happy to say that I was able, as I had promised Lou[1] ― to say nothing wh. could irritate him. ― Indeed I was unable to do justice to myself, & at last fairly broke down. He ended [affably], with the most gloomy forebodings indeed “if he were to predict” ―― but hoping that he might be wrong, & with a “God bless you!” he finely admitted that he did not know the person herself, nor every one so totally knows her. L. promises to do all she can to make things better with him but fears that nothing but time will [reveal], ― that            he will not have the Malcolms at Ravensdale &c. &c. She begs me to say nothing to the old Lady until I am engaged, & quite agrees that I should speak out to Lady W. next month, & have everything understood. I have not made up my mind yet about Mrs. R. ― Nothing has been said between her & others on the subject. My dear fellow, what a miserable man I should be  ― if I had the faintest misgiving in my own mind, as to what I am about to do., ― but I have not, & my purpose is certainly tried in the fire by C.’s feelings & arguments.” ――― A sad story indeed! May all end well ― but I fear sometimes.

We walked to church in mizzly rain. As Satan would have it, the A. Creed was read, for S. Bartholomew’s day! ― but I stood out the nonsense & blasphemy, wh. is so only to those whose eyes are not sealed by early prejudice, or narrow capacity.

The church is beautiful ― the service well conducted. Permeation of stables followed, wh. I eschewed. ― I fix to go hence on Wednesday, to Filey. Lunch ― very cheerful & pleasant ― the children are really very delightful. Wrote to C.F. & to Mrs. Palmer, [Christopher] Empson, & Louisa [Ranson], & Ed. Waterton. At 4 showed Palestine drawings to Lady W. & the children; ― & afterwards walked till 7.15. in the park & in the wood: very pretty. Dinner; pleasant: & evening ditto. Prayers. Sang a good deal afterwards. The 2 ― host & hostess are regular good people. ― Bed at 11.45.

 


[1] Louisa, Clermont’s wife.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 23 August 1862

Quite fine all day ― very lovely Autumn weather.

Rose at 5.30 ― & from 6 to 8.30. worked at Homer. Very pleasant quiet morning ― at the window over the flower Garden. At 8.30. walked about the terraces. 9.5. Prayers ― rather lengthy & complicated. Breakfast with Lord & Lady W. cheerful & pleasant. ― Afterwards ― drew ― attempting a copy of Valley of Josaphat, till 2: ― but did not draw well. ― Lunch ― & all 6 of the children, & Miss Cunningham the Governess. And after that, Book of Nonsense with the merry little folk. ― Then, at 3, came 112 of the schoolchildren with flags & music, & long tables were set out for tea. There were races &c. &c. ― & later, all at tea. A really pretty sight, & it is beautiful to see how well the [Lawleys] join in helping  the children: Lady W. was indefatigable in prize giving & joining games. Every one seems to like them. Two daughters of the Archbp. of York were there, ἀλλὰ, δὲν ἢξευρα ποίαι ἧσαν.[1] ― Afterwards, were other games, ―― but at 6.30. I found it damp & came in.

No one at dinner. Alarm about the mouse afterwards. Discorso ― magro e poco.[2] ―

Afterwards ― talk with Lady W. ― who showed me no end of the Library &c. &c.

bed at 11.30 ― or 11.45.

 


[1] But I didn’t know who they were (NB).

[2] Talk ― slight and not much.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 22 August 1862

Fine all day ― a shower only at 4.

Rose at 6. “Packed.” ―”They came & took away” the Colossi of Thebes ― a picture I like to see, & put glasses onto others. At 12 ― I went off in the Gt. Northern ― 4 Scotch people in the same Carriage. ― Huntingdon at 1.20: Peterborough: 2, then Grantham & Redford. Doncaster, &c. &c. ― & York at 5.30. ― a pleasant journey, great fields of yellow corn. Fly to Escrick, a [long] village. The Hall substantial & pleasant. Lord & Lady Wenlock out: so I dined alone, & played on the Piano & read afterwards till 10, when they came in.

I like both always. ―

At 11. to bed.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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