Monday, 6 March 1865

Wonderful to say, cloudy morning, & only gleams of sun till 2 or 3 ― after which rain, ― & ever since 5, & now ― at 10 ― P.M. ― rain!! The quiet rain here, unaccompanied by wind, ― is a contrast to Corfu days.

Worked immensely all day ― & with success ― beginning the 4th process of the 160 Tyrants ― which labor I thought of painfully: ― yet I got thro’ 20 ― more or less finishd ― foregrounds.

No one came. & no post ― (only a kind note from Lady F. about the notes I had sent [for] Lady Frances. What “well-bred” people are those Fitzwilliams! ― which word includes much.

Various interruptions from beggars ― & the “Sacred heart of Jesus” ― ne voulez vous donner quelque chose Monsieur.”

At 5.15. called on Mrs. Saltmarshe ― who goes tomorrow to Genova & Rome.

Some good sort of folk ― Shaw_Taylor’s were there. ―

Penned out till 10.20. ― Only 4 more of the Corniche road to get through.

Heard G. & set him fresh copy.

20. of the 160 Tyrants. 4th process.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Sunday, 5 March 1865

Of course ―― always the same weather.

Antibes. 5 March 1865. (73) Watercolor and sepia ink over graphite on white paper.34.1 x 55.5 cm.

Antibes. 5 March 1865. (73) Watercolor and sepia ink over graphite on white paper.34.1 x 55.5 cm.

Awoke at 5.30 ― & G. has woke no sooner; so there was hurry ― & by the time I & he were ready, it was 6.25. A hustle therefore to the rail, ― but there was time for tickets, & off at 6.50 ― (being then train of 6.30. ― By people in the carriage, learned that today is the festa of the “Return from Elba.” & that all the world were going to Golfe Jouan.[1] Passed the Column of 1-Mars[2] ― 1815 ― & went on ― & up ― & on to a point where the Estrekkes were well seen. Here, above, among Pine & Cork-trees, I remained, to draw once, ― & lunch ― at 11 ― 12. Pleasant ― calm. ―

Pont du Var. 5 March 1865. (75) Watercolor and sepia ink over graphite on cream paper. 22.7 x 53 cm.

Pont du Var. 5 March 1865. (75) Watercolor and sepia ink over graphite on cream paper. 22.7 x 53 cm.

At 12 walked slowly back, (there is nothing in the Golfe-Jouan to draw) ― & waited on the beach: a small festa: as G. said, Πανυγύριζε άπεθαμένος, κὶ ἐπληρώσαμεν ἓνα πέννι, διὰ νερό.[3]

Pont du Var. 5 March 1865. (76) Watercolor, sepia ink and Chinese white over graphite on blue paper.11.7 x 35.3 cm.

Pont du Var. 5 March 1865. (76) Watercolor, sepia ink and Chinese white over graphite on blue paper.11.7 x 35.3 cm.

At 2.15 ― to the rail: & at 2.45, off, great lots of people coming from Cannes to the fête. Arrived at Pont de Var ^[Station] at 3.20; whence walked to the Bridge & drew till 4.45. ― Whence, slowly ― homewards, arriving by 6.20.

Three letters
Holman Hunt ― date 23rd. Still painting the Fairbairn picture.
J.B. Harford ― wanting me to go to Cannes.
T. Cooper ― enclosing 3
1. Bill of Winn & Newton ―
2. from Underhill.
3. Cards of Vernon Lushington.

So, I dined, on G.’s good Maccaroni, cold mutton & cooked broccoli: & τὶ ἄλλα; ― τίποτε.[4]


[1] Golfe-Juan.

[2] A column in Golfe-Juan commemorating Napoleon’s landing on 1 March 1815.

[3] Nina says: “This doesn’t make much sense to me, buti t is what it says: ‘He was celebrating dead, and we gave a penny for water.’”

[4] What else? ― Nothing.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Saturday, 4 March 1865

Same astonishing weather. The sea all day long I s profound sapphire blue, & the same bright.

I, ὅμως,[1]work on, mole-like, in the little room back. No letters; but the missing mewspaper.

Adml. Henry Murray is dead. A loss to many. Kind-hearted Henry Murray! ― In 1849 ― in days of Cairo ―― & since.

At 1 ― Mrs. Saltmarshe called: she goes to Rome, with [Posidoni] ― on Tuesday. Poor lady ― she was sad ― &, telling me of the last Rawson’s deaths, (Louisa R.’s Father-in-law & uncle,) ― she nearly cried. “Changed indeed is everything: sometimes I hardly think I am the same person, knowing & loving so many then ― now so few.” ―

“So fares it still in our decay.”[2]

Concluded the 3rd process of the 160 tyrants, today, besides having coloured a good many of the Corniche drawings. At 5.30 walked out, irritated & depressed ― for that Promenade is too odious, to Mrs. Smith-Barry’s. Lo! ― she went χθὲς![3] ―― ――

Dined at 6.45. G., who will clean up all the kitchen ― tired.

Penned out till 10. Only 7 drawings are now left to pen.


[1] However.

[2] Thus fares it still with our decay:
And yet the wiser mind
Mourns less for what Time takes away,
Than what it leaves behind.
(Wordsworth, “The Fountain: A Conversation”).

[3] Yesterday.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Friday, 3 March 1865

Weather ― if possible ― bluer & brighter & shinier & wonderfuller than ever. I never knew such a winter climate as this, anyhow.

But the drawbax! the loneliness ―or ― the only alternative ― the fuss & fashion!

Rose at 6.30 ― & by 7.15 ― work ― all day at the last Tyrants ― & coloring the Corniche drawings, which, ― tho’ they turn out well, is really a dreadful bore.

No letters: ― no newspaper: ― no nothing: & nobody came.

After the golden sunset, at 5.40 ― walked to Mrs. Beaumont: a most pleasant & kindly lady that.

Back, to dine at 6.45.

Heard G. read, & penned out till 10.30. 2 drawings ― only 8 left.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Thursday, 2 March 1865

Same astonishing clear weather. Without doubt I have never seen any such climate as this, for winter wear.

Rose at 6.30 ― & before 7.30 at work.

Finished the 3rd process of the drawings already begun ― (155 ―) & went on with the remaining 6, till 5. P.M.

No letters: some error: τουλάχιζον[1] there should have been a newspaper.

Wrote a sort of essay on foregrounds for Lady F. Fitzwilliam.

No one came.

So at 5.30 ― took my letter to Chateau St. Laurent, ― & also one to Mrs. Saltmarshe & one to Mr. Frankland.

Dined at 6.35. ―

Heard D. read & set him a copy & penned out till 10.30.

Absolutely all the December Corniche drawings ― excepting 10 are penned out!


[1] At least (τουλάχιστον).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Wednesday, 1 March 1865

Quite particular lovely all day ― how one longs to be out!

Medicine.

A miserable day ― as might be expected.

Worked at Tyrants ― on & off.

No one came.

Called on Mr. Lyon.

Dined at 6.30 ― somewhat better.

Penned out till 10.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Tuesday, 28 February 1865

Bright early ― but cloudy from noon to sunset ― i.e. gleamy cloudy.

Did not go out all day.

No letters. ― Wrote to E. Baring.

Worked by fits ― yet pretty well.

X9

Dined at 6.15.

Talk with G. about going yo England ― & about his returning. After a long fit of bother, he says, & says rightly ― “Posso dire, non è lo stesso come prima.[1] Cristo is dead. Giovanni is no longer living in houses. Spiro has left us, & we do not know if he will ever return. My mother is old: my wife is a good one ― but alone ― my sons are not old enough to take care of them. So, though I would go all over the world with you, I ought to go back. ― And you must no longer pay 4 months wages for no work, which you cannot afford ―: therefore I ought to leave you, e ^[per] quanto sia male non fa niente,[2] πρέπει νὰ ἠναι οὐτως.”[3]

Andhe is right & good: & so it must be.

It is better thus perhaps ―: yet nearly 10 years of good service from a faithful good fellow make the parting hard. ― ὦ ζωή μας! Τι εἶσαι;[4]

Bed at 10.30.

XXX


[1] I can say it is not the same as before.

[2] Even though it is not a good thing, it does not matter.

[3] It must be so.

[4] O life! What are you?


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Monday, 27 February 1865

Hardly cold at all ― but perfectly calm & bright all day ― & the sunset most lovely.

Rose at 6.40 ― better for χθὲς τὸ περίπατον.[1] Worked ― off & on at 3rd process of the 160 Tyrants ― even until 5.15. ― a prison, yet becoming more bearable as knowing the end approaches.

Accounts with G.; he writes them better now a days, poor man. ―

Letter from Mary Wentworth ― θαύμαστον ― καὶ θαυμαζόμενος ἐγῶ.[2] She wishes to borrow 100£ of me for 3 years ― & will ensure her lige & pay me 5 per cent. Has asked her brother, but he refuses.

Thought over the matter. The only clear 100£ I have is truly due to Foords: & I cannot tell why M.W. is in want ―― as, ― since her own brother refuses, it may be for some not good reason. Putting all things together, I dedided ― tho’ with vexation ― to refuse. And did so.

Posted letters to Mary Wentworth ― & to Mrs. G. Clive ― & F. Lushington: ― a late walk ― at 6.

Dined at 6.45 ― G. being late, & it seems to me, not over well. Yet his Maccaroni & curried Turkey were tip=top.

Penned out Cogoletto drawings till 10. ― G. neither read nor wrote.


[1] Yesterday’s walk.

[2] Marvelous ― and U marvelling (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Sunday, 26 February 1865

Contrary to expectations ― it was fine.

Rose at 5 ― 5.30 ― & at 6.10 ― off. Rail at 6.30 & at Antibes by 7.10. Drew before passing the town ― & afterwards ― till 9 ―: & drawing the pines, the outline of Nice coast &c. &c. ― till 11.

Then we walked round the South part of the Promontory, but came at 12 to the place we lunched in on Sunday week.

A pleasant hour: somehow the olives, blue sea, & blue Estrelles, recall [worlds] & eyes. ―

Came down lower, below the Lanterna, & drew till 2. Then set off ―
Vance by 4.30.
Pont du Var, by 5.30
& “at home” by 6.45.

G. gave me Maccaroni & cold Turkey for dinner.

Letter from Mrs. G. Clive ―: wrote to her.

This day was perfect in loveliness ― & all colour more brilliant & exquisite than it is possible to conceive. The sea ― a sheet of Emerald-green, & [real ult] ― like Maccaw’s tail-feathers.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Saturday, 25 February

Very cloudy & windy all day ― in gusts: & at 4 ― 4.30 ― a quarter of an hour of rain drops ― 50 in all, ― much for this dry place. However, it is doubtful if one can get out of Brighton tomorrow.

Worked all day ― (my neck is becoming really crooked,) at the Tyrants: ― & I don’t know if they are well or otherwise done as yet.

Letter from Cromek ― who is better: ― At 3.30 came little Vladímir Golonoise (?) the little Russian boy of Sunday last, & his Finn Tutor: very pleasant specimens of those worlds.

Walked out at 5.30 to post letters to Mrs. Hunt, C. Fortescue, & Dickenson: & called on Mrs. Smith-Barry: which that visit was not pleasant: she lives with & talks of Princesses μόνον.[1]

Dined at 6.30. Cold Turkey ― & afterwards penned out till 10.30. Heard G. read.

The sea roars. Doubtful weather.


[1] Only.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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