Sunday, 24 July 1864

This regular irregularity of pain!

Rose at 8 ――. Cooper’s little girl still lives: ――― a great misery for these poor people.

I coloured 6 more Cretan drawings & penned out one ― before 1. A.M. (The Coopers brought me up a plate of has mutton “by way of change” ― they said ― but in reality is a humble way to testify that they were gratified for sympathy ―― which, however, any man, not a hog, should give.) It comes over me at times that the “old times,[”] are all gone: ― no more Corfu ― no more Greece: no more light. ― …… Wrote― finishing ― letters to Taylor, & to George ― ordering all things to England: but as to wintering at Genoa, or Spain, or elsewhere ― who can say? ― Best wait & work ―― but this last how hard to do here! ――――――――

So at 4 I called on Mrs. Crake: ― shrunken, but yet little older: she would talk of W.N. ― wh. I stopped. And “Mary Ann” is at “Quorn Hall” forsooth, “a beautiful place in Leicestershire” ― forsooth! an’ I knew it not! then I walked across the park to Bruces ― but met him, & Mrs. Bruce, & one of his sisters, & little Willy. This was refreshing: A certain sort of brightness & truth is in Mrs. Bruce’s face ― unlike ordinary expressions. She would light up a dark room. H.A.B. left at Constitution Hill, ― they & I walked back to Poiner’s gate ― where I put them in a Hansom cab. Then walked home, & at 8 to Blue Posts, where I dined, & came back by 9.30


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Saturday, 23 July 1864

Rose at 6.30. The poor little Girl still living!

Worked horribly hard all day ― ˇ[colouring &] penning out Cretan drawings. No one came, till 5 ― when Sir H.J. Storks called. His account of Whittingham well explaining the animus of the “4 years in Corfû.[”] Did not go out at all, but at 6.45 ― cab to 37. Tavistock Place.

1864-07-23

Wonderfully pleasant in all ways.

Cab home by 11.30.

X8


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Friday, 22 July 1864

Being waked by the Portuguese lodger, who comes home at 4 ―― rose at 4.30 ― & worked at penning out Cretan sketches from 5 to 7.15 ― when I was obliged to come downstairs, ― (one gets no coffee here!) & sleep till 9. The poor Cooper’s little girl still lives, but dies slowly. ― “O world! O life! O time!” ― words equally ˇ[to be] applied to all grades. ―――

No one came all day!! ――

Penned out, finishing the 4th dozen of large Cretan drawings ― & began to color: ― moving (once more,) my oil paints downstairs. ―

At 6. went to Charlton’s & looked at some furniture. ― Day oppressive ―― gray ―― cloudy. At 7.30 to 45. Portland Place. ―

1864-07-22

Wonderfully pleasant party ― in every possible way. Afterwards, I sang a bit.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Thursday, 21 July 1864

Rose late. Always very warm weather.

Cooper’s little girl still lives on.

F. Lushington called ― Mrs. Beadon & Elizabeth & Col. Cockburn ― & C. Wynne & 3 Miss Lestrange, no buyers. ― Much loss of time ――

Worked at the Butrinto ― but by no means cheerily. At 5.30 or 6 came C. Fortescue, asking me to dine with him at the Blue-posts: very amiable ― & very unlucky that I cannot.

At 7.15 to G. Middleton’s, ― out of humour that I cannot dine with C.F., & foreboding a boring evening ― wh. did but so turn out;

1864-07-21

Mrs. M. is an amiable woman, tho’ alquanto heavy. Cambridge possesses the Leake Coins. Except George M. None of that family are worthy to speak of him.

Home by 11.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Wednesday, 20 July 1864

A strange day. Rose at 7. Cooper’s little ggirl is worse. Nicolas’s men came at 9 & moved down the 3 cabinets to the 1st floor: ― in the midst of which operation came C. Fortescue ― Mrs. Wilson & the Rev. Mr. Eaton, ―& later Marianne & Catherine North & Mr. Shuttleworth.

Afterwards I worked awfully hard ― getting down the drawings ― 64 descents in all. (Charles Cockburn came also.) ― & so till 8. Then I went to the Blue Posts & dined comfortably returning at 10 ― & working again at placing the drawings till 11.30. ― When all were down stairs. Queer life.

Bed at 12.

X7


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Tuesday, 19 July 1864

Rose pretty early…

Worked at the Porto 3 scoglie, & Butrinto.

& somewhat in penning out.

Came Wade-Browne & G. Scrivens

Walked at 6.30 to Digby-Wyatt’s, out: ― & returned.

Dined μοναχῶς.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Monday, 18 July 1864

Rose at 6. Foords men hung the pictures[.]

Letters from Mr. Edwards ― Jenny is safe. from Lady Hunter: & Miss Waugh. At 9.30 ― went to Victoria Station.

A hot & lovely old-fashioned summer’s day. Long & tiresome journey ― changing at Croydon, & Horsham. Beyond Pulborough the new line is beautiful ― going close below Peppering & Burpham, & the Offham hanger. From the Station ― below the Causeway hill, ― walked to the “Old Bank.” Young Salter ― H.S.’s son received me, a pleasant & gentlemanly youth. Then poor Sarah ― sadly afflicted, & poor Mr. Street, but he is very cheerful ― though a good deal aged. After a little lunch, (I arrived at 1) 2 hours went in talk with poor Sarah. Then came the funeral visitors, (one, a very fat bearded man would not have recognized me ― nor I him ― Robt. Duke.) At 3 ― the funeral. ― a foot procession ― left the house ― Volunteers of Fred’s Corps carrying his body ― & the band preceding ― all up ― up ― the high Street. Mr. Street & young Salter walked first: I & Mr. Wilson next. Looking back from the top of the hish-street ― (nearly all the houses were closed ―) ― what reflections rose! How I remembered my sister Sarah, then well off ― & her 2 boys ― Fred only a year old ― playing there! ― Then ― entering the churchyard ― (all that part one thick theory of people! ― What a strange annihilation of time ― recollecting as I did the repeated Sunday entrances to that porch! ― Then old Mr. Hart nasally reading the service! (The ancient ghosts of Calkin at the organ, ― Miss Griffith, & Miss Parkins Mrs. Quennell ― all seemed to rise: & others too. ―

Happily ― what I came there for was uppermost. At the grave, the Volunteers [blotted, illegible phrase] alone lowered the body. Often as I have heard that service read, I never did so with more interest. They fired “three volleys in the air” ― over poor Fred’s grave. I walked back, between poor Mr. Street & Mr. Wilson. Of Mr. W. I recollect little or nothing: perhaps all the better ― as I can’t help thinking he ought not to have let his daughter marry S. At the Bank, I saw, for the first time for many years ― Mrs. Fredk. S. ― still ― though she must be 45 or more, very good-looking. Then followed a lunch dinner: kindly all, & not unpleasant in any way: ― & I must add that my nephew’s stepson’s & daughter’s care for everything made everything satisfactory. ― After this ― a talk upstairs ― & good bye. ― But how sad for the poor old parents! ― & for the widow! “Ten years together & never one word of difference!!” ―― she said more than once ― “is not the happiness to make this loss ― looking back ―very dreadful?”

Young Salter came with me to the Station. A Volunteer there ― crying ― I spoke to: his name was Sharpe ― & his wife was apparently [of] the Servant class ― “Says O” ―: but the feeling of that man was one of the Saul & Jonathan order ― & I should be glad to see him again. [Evidently, the good life of Fk. Street was the cause of this witnessing of sympathy at his death][1] A tedious journey followed ― to Victoria Station at 8.30. ― Got some supper home. Several people have called ― Sir H.J. Storks, Baring &c. ―

Poor Thomas Cooper’s little baby is very ill. ―


[1]In a box on the page for 17 July.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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