Saturday, 1 October 1864

Of course ― δυστυχῆς.[1] Did not work all day, for Dickenson’s men came, & hung up the Beirût ― putting up rods in the back room, & hanging the Civitella, & various prints. Cecil Lane came about 3 & staid till I went to the Rail: ― fly from Weybridge to Ockham, The tall pine=stem scenery & the long lanes where used so often to walk at the end of 1860, & the first days of 1861 ―!! ― Several children at the Doctor’s ― whose family is always a model of kindness, order, & simplicity, ―besides high culture & natural superior intellect.

Great explosion of Powder mills at Erith today.

1864-10-01

The Doctor, now past 82 ― is more wonderful than ever, & told endless currents of anecdote. Some I really thought I should remember, but do not. Of the uncle of Coke of Leicester, (who only recognized Mr. C. when he had no hopes of family) ― he sent Mr. S, as his representative to a country ball in a coach & 6, with a lot of ladies he might dance with, & v. versa.

The evening was altogether pleasant.


[1] Miserable (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1864, Diary Entry

Friday, 30 September 1864

Rose before 7 ― “clearing rubbish”  from studio & “selling palette” till 8. Letter from poor Cromek. ―

Worked till 1 or 2 at snatches of alteration in the Jánina, which is an unfinishable picture. After a large luncheon slept & read Bates’s Amazons till 3. This transition or interregnum state between work is a sad time.

At 4 I went to Mrs. Slingsby Bethell, & found her & poor dear Amma Parkyns ― the latter very poorly. sate some time. Walked to Grosvenor Place ― but the Stanleys were fled. Then to Coventry St. ― paying bills & ordering drawers ― & home.

At 7.30 ― came Thomas Wyatt ― & nothing could be kinder or pleasanter than his manner & converse all the evening ― after last nights “fiasco” a great consolation.

1864-09-30

We looked at Φώτογράφς ― & went at 10.15.

Bed at 11.

Very pleasant evening.

(X9)


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1864, Diary Entry

Thursday, 29 September 1864

Always fine. So lovely a year I cannot quite remember ―― but one sees it chiefly thro’ chimney tops.

Dickenson came ― & took order about the paper to be mounted for the 1865 drawings: also 2 small wings of bookscase.

T 12, I walked to Coutts’s, & got good king Fairbairn’s cheque for 157.10 ― changed. Cab back. Then paid endless bills ― & walked to the Westminster Deanery, but A.P.S. being away at 6 Grosvenor St. I walked there, but they were out. Back ― wholly tired & sad ― by 5 ― slept & played till 7. ˇ[Met Boyd.] At 7.30 came Wade-Browne ― in a foolish mood. After all, with all his cheeriness, he is silly, or seems so at times, ― & too fine.

1864-09-29

[Since writing this journal, I have read of this day last year’s ― at Dudbrook ― & far more miserable parà τουto.]

But the dinner was a mortle failure! ― All the Oysters might have been good, by Brown took one he said was bad, ― (the first he ate,) & ate no more. ― The cutlets were not as good as usual; ― the hare was really good ― but mancava[1] stuffing: & the partridges were totally horrid, & had to be sent away ― tho’ B. ˇ[had] said they ought to be good at just this day. And to crown all, Cooper hadn’t got a fresh apple pie ― but had “warmed up” that of yesterday, so that I saw the poor Guardsman shudder. ― I, being tired & unwell couldn’t throw fun into all this, but had to let things take their way. So I played, & shewed “Roberts’s Holy Land,” ― & at 11. B. elapsed. I shall not ask him to dine again: ― the arrangements do not fit ―[2] [“]how can my (notions) longer mix with thine?” ― B. said, ― Craven, when he heard that he, (W.B.) was going to dine with me, used to say ― “O! then you will have a very Pre-Raphaellite dinner ― very minute.” But Craven was a pig & an ass. Q.E.D.


[1] There wasn’t enough.

[2] The entry continues at the bottom of the facing page, for 30 September.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1864, Diary Entry

Wednesday, 28 September 1864

Did little but fuss ― & arrange paper for mounts, till at 4.30 ― Fairbairn really came, & paid £157.10 for the Joannina, with which he was greatly pleased. This is a thund’ring big pleasure.

At 5.-5.30 ― walked to Foord’s, to order Matters about mounts &c. &c. &c. Back by 7 ― & at 7.45 ― E. Drummond came. We had a really pleasant evening, ― 2 soles, cutlets, & Lady Goldsmid’s Hare being the dinner ― beside an apple pie.

Afterwards, we looked at Cretan sketches, & so on ― till 12.

1864-09-28


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1864, Diary Entry

Tuesday, 27 September 1864

Slept well ― extremely ― but rose at 6.30 anxious about Fairbairn’s coming. But no Φαίρβαιrn came at all. So I wrote letter, & worried & fussed ― & looked out paper to mount for the imaginary prospective 240(!!!) drawings of 1865: ― & fussed & worried ― & read Bates’s Amazon ―― but the day ― ever fine ― wore away ― & no one called.

So, at 5 ― I walked straight on end to Gresham St. & there dined with poor Will N.

1864-09-27

Allan is grown immensely tall ― an awkward, but quiet, & I think intelligent lad. I wish anything could be done for him. ―

Cab home ― by 11.

Found a letter from Fairbairn ― he comes tomorrow at noon: ― & a very nice letter from Wade-Browne. And 2/2 brace of Grouse from someone anonymous.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1864, Diary Entry

Monday, 26 September 1864

Dull gray ― & ἔτζι εἶμαι ἐγῶ.[1]

A Dies non ― other than for penitenza.

Sent to procure an Abruzzo volume at Maclean’s ― & got one ― which later I forwarded to Wade-Browne. ―

Did no work ― but arranged ― or rather selected drawings for possible winter work.

No Fairbairn.

At 5 ― went to Ampthill Square.

1864-09-26

Quiet & not unpleasant evening. Home before 11. ―


[1] So am I (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1864, Diary Entry

Sunday, 25 September 1864

Rose at 8 ― pooh pudor!

At breakfast ― reading Bates’ Brazil,[1] with very gt. delight.

Afterwards ―― looked over unpenned sketches ― selecting those I should take abroad to make drawings from.

At 1. came Wade=Browne & lunched ― so to speak. ― So I gave up my “professional life” ―― & went with him in a cab to Victoria Park ― not so lovely as I was told it was by any means. Ἔπειτα ― by omnibus & cab ― to Battersea Park ― (about 5. P.M.) & those Gardens are really wonderfully lovely. Climbing Rails &c. &c. ― & so we walked to Bond St. together ― I was to dine with W.B. at the [Jemion] but, that being shut, ― at Long’s. So I walked home & dressed, & at 7.30 was again at Longs. Dinner profuse & excellent ― but most costly. Much ˇ[(of wine &c.)] was added perhaps thro’ my own gauche stupidity. After all ― W.B. vanished ― & I, (tho’ I waited for him some 10 minutes ―) came home by 10.30.

Whereby I am at home at 10.30. But, δὲν θέλω ἒτζι γευματίσω [illegible Greek word][2] ―

XX8


[1] Henry Walter Bates’s The Naturalist on the River Amazons. 2 vols. London: Murray 1863; or the abridged 1-volume edition of 1864.

[2] I do not wish to dine thus [] (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

Leave a comment

Filed under 1864, Diary Entry