Monthly Archives: January 2011

Thursday, 24 January 1861

Bother.

Rose at 7.30 ― did a little Θουκυδίδης.

Worked ― fitfully & slovenly ― at Bethlehem. But I was much interrupted. Foord’s man, to put up curtains ― W.F. Beadon ― I think better a little, and later, Ralph, Allan, & Mary Nevill: ― 3 dear little children. Ralph ― by far the best head & general “arrangement” of “that ilk.” ―

At 2.30 went to British Museum, & saw C. Newton, ― anent Consulate, Macbean & Cholmley are candidates ― & also ―――― !! Severn! ―

This last monstrous folly is backed by Eastlake & Gladstone!!

So I came away, leaving a card ― on Mr. Gray ― & then to Bob Martineau; ― (the drawings in the Elgin rooms, & the struggle in Martineau’s, were curious to me.) ― After this to Gould’s ― where I saw Prince. Story of G.’s sons, & daughters, the latter sad. ―

Home ― (walking with Somers Cocks.)

James Edwards came: διὰ τοῦτο, τὴν ἑξορίαν τῶν τῶν αύτῶν πραγμάτων: ((For this, the exile of their own affairs (NB).)) ― & sad they are ― yet it seems to me may yet come right. ― At 7.30 to Edgar Drummond’s. He, Mrs. E.D., & Alfred Drummond a brother, there. Dinner extremely good, καὶ κρασι: ((And wine (NB).)) ― there is something very interesting in those 2 ― the sweet, intelligent melancholy of Mrs. D. ― & the straight sailor like friendliness of E.A. Drummond. Home by 11.30: found a kind note from Mrs. Gray.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Wednesday, 23 January 1861

Rose at 7.30. Warmer ― but darker. Letters from S.W.C. Lady Reid, Mrs. Hunt, James Hornby ― & Mrs. Parkyns.

Painted pretty hard from 9.30 to 4 ― interrupted by C. Fortescue, F. Lushington, & S.W. Clowes calling ―― all welcome stoppages. The Bethlehem tocca a finire. ((I suppose Lear meant “I have to finish the Bethlehem” (Mi tocca finire il B.) or, more probably, “It is the Bethlehem’s turn to get finished” (Tocca al B. essere finito).))

At 5 went out, & had hair cut. Then waited at J.B. Edwards’s till 6.30. Ἔπειτα ((Then.)) ― to C. Fortescue’s, & with him to the St. James’s Hall, where we dined. (Dickey Doyle there when we went in.)

At 8.15 C.F. cabbed away νά ὑπάγῃ εἰς τὴν Ἰζλανδίαν, καὶ ἐγῶ εἰς τὴν οἰκείαν μου. ((To go to Iceland (Ισλανδία), and me to my home (NB). Lear, always suffering from cold, might mean that Fortescue goes to his icy rooms, or perhaps Iceland is metaphorical for a life of cold relationships.))

XX

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 22 January 1861

Not too cold. Rose at 7.30 ― & worked at Bethlehem from 9 to 4, & very decently.

At 4 went to Wyatt’s ― & by 6 to Mr. Bell’s. Only Mr. & Mrs. B. & JameSalter [sic].

Evening così ((So so.)) ― cards ― which abhor me.

Walked to Fleet St. with James S. Cab home by 11.

Why have all chymists female names?

He is either an Ann Eliza, or a Charlotte Anne.

How many foreigners, & of what nation make one uncivil?

40 Poles make one rood ―

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Monday, 21 January 1861

Milder, ― delightful letters from Geoff, Miss (Georgiana) & Wyndham Hornby. From Ann also ― & Clowes.

Got to work pretty early, & worked at the Bethlehem more or less till 4, or 3.30. ― Lo! ― James Uwins!

(“Μ᾽ ἀρέσκει ἐκείνος ― διότι ὀμιλεί ὀσὰν τίποτες,” ((I like him ― because he talks like nothing (NB, who notes that Giorgio might have meant “because he talks nonsense” or “he doesn’t talk at all”).)) said George one day. ―) James is placid, but apparently doing nothing. Later, came C. Flint & his son, a kindly fellow C.R.F. ―

At 4 I went out ― & called on Mrs. Shakespeare ― Mrs. S. & Ida were there: ― there is something acidangular in the household. Sir John & Lady Young are off to Australia. ( Sir W.D. was to leave on the 22nd for Madras, poor Lady D. to go to England direct!!! ―)

Then, call on Crakes ― did not go in.

Then, Col. Hornby, who goes to Littlegreen tomorrow: ― I was glad I saw him. ―

Poi ― “St. James’s Hall” ― & dined, dinner, fluids, & waiter, for 6/6. Wrote to Ann, & E. Drummond.

Col. H.’s account of Lady Derby is not good.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Sunday, 20 January 1861

Cold thaw ― & foggy. Looked over drawings ― μάλλον, Ἀμπρουζζικὰ, ((Rather, [the] Abruzzi [sketches] (NB, guessing since Ἀμπρουζζικὰ does not exist in modern Greek).)) ― till 12.30. Cab to Woodberry.

All the family except GeoffMiss Robinson also, & Dearlove.

Day pleasant, but there seems trouble ahead with Willie, who has left the rifles, & seems indisposed to everything. Dearlove is a nice & healthy-minded fellow, & I wish he were there all the holidays. Ralph is clever & good. ―

Allan is good ― but I can’t see what he will be yet, ― best that he is alone. Mary is a darling child. Guy clever & spoiled. ― Hugh ― φοβοῦμαι! ((I’m afraid (NB).))

At 8, was sent to Portland Place in the Brougham: cab home.

Gave
£1.0.0 to Allan.
.4.0 cab & turnpikes
.2.0 to coachman

――――――――――

1.6.0 days higspences.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 19 January 1861

Wholly dark, cold, & utterly miserable. And letters came from Church, misdirected, so that I never got them yesterday.

pw_fountain

P. Williams's Neapolitan Peasants at a Fountain, 1859.

Arranged, unpacked, &c. &c. ― At 12, C.M.C. & at 2 I walked with him to various palces, & then to the Brompton Boilers, & saw Giant Turner, & also P. Williams “Fountain” ((Penry William’s Neapolitan Peasants at a Fountain, 1859, now at Tate.)) ―― which looks very well: tho’ its evident circle=like composition is unpleasant. Yet by Eastlakes imposition it seems fine.) ― C.M.C. went to Lord Aucklands, & I back alone ― paying bills &c. & home by 5. Saw Gush ― returned from Canada. Saw Curzon (Robert) ― Saw Grenfell. ―

What is to become of the Cedars?

XX

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 18 January 1861

Letter from C. Flint.

Finer, & less cold. Regrets at going, & would I could stay, but it is not possible. All packed. Called on Mr. Hewitson ― out, ― Dickenson’s man, Ford, came, & packed the poor Cedars. ― & I left all my things with him, & then came away from Oatlands Hotel, which I shall often have to think of pleasantly. ―― Walked to Chertsey. There, at the Swan, took a Dog Cart, ― & came to V. Water ((Virginia Water.)), & Sunninghill, where I found C. Flint & his 9 children. He does not seem much older, nor does she. ― We drove to V. Water, & saw the skating: & there was Cheales also ― a far more simpatico ((Pleasant, nice.)) fellow. I went to his house ― where his new wife is ill still.

Then C.R.F. took me to the Rail ― 5. Seymour Bathurst in the carriage ― & we got to Waterloo by 6.30. Stratford Place, tired. No note from C.M.C. So I dined on cold beef & came to bed ― after unpacking boxes.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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