Monthly Archives: September 2010

Monday, 24 September 1860

At 7 rose. 8 breakfast with the Comte de Paris. Grenfell later ― but C.F. did not appear, so the Count & I drove to Brentwood ― where the others arrived just in time.

Merry rail to town. Cab to Stratford Pl. & then set off to go to Oatlands, meeting Thrupp, with whom I walked to the Waterloo Station. From Walton Station I walked to Mr. Lyles ― & arranged to send the picture: ― then lunched at the Hotel, & afterwards walked among the Cedars & called on Mr. Hewitson. ― Then to Walton on Thames ― meeting Charles Lushington & “Lacaita” on the way. Poi, called on John Lewis, & saw first Mrs. L. then l’Arrabiato ((The angry one.)) ― who is always sneery & disagreable in many ways. Rail ― & back to town by 7 ― & cab home ― as, once more, it poured with rain.

Torrinx of rain all night.

Letters from Newton,
Ann,
P. Coombe &.

X10

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Sunday, 23 September 1860

Dull gray. Rose before 7. Wrote to Macbean & other 6. At 10 ― breakfast ― but thoroughly chilled by cold damp. Many went to church, but I not ―: sate, & walked with C.F. & H.J.G. ― & later, Lady W. came out & the 2 doggies. How well she looked ― tho’ not so ― for she has had a bad throat. ― Later came H.R.H. of Paris: ― & then Wardlaw, talk & walk till lunch. All merry enough. ― After, C.F., H.J.G. & I walked to the cottage at Knavestock ((Navestock.)) ― but it was dreadfully cold & gloomy damp. Genl. & Mrs. Malcolm & I sate indoors ― & at one time I walked about with Mrs. M. ― Then there was tea, & little Constance B. And at 6 all went back, G. & I walking. Some of his stories are good. Μίαν φορὰν, μία νέα κυρία ˇ[τις] ερώτισε ἀπὸ τὴν Κωμιτὶσσαν, ― διά ἕν βιβλίον του ὁποίου επροσταχθῆ οτι δεν εμπορούσε ― (ιγουν η νεα κυρια,) τὸ διαβάση. ―― Ποτὲ ἐμπορῶ νὰ τὸ λέγω; ――― ἀποκριθή ἡ Κωμιτισσα ―― “Ὅταν θὰ ἔχεις τρία συζυγούς.” ((One day, a young lady asked the Countess about a book she had been toold she could not read. “When can I read it?” And the Countess replied: “When you are on husband number three” (Nina Bouri).))

After dinner I sang a good deal, & there were Question games.

Μίαν φοράν, νέα κυρία (ἡ κοπέλλα) τις ἐρώτισε ἀπὸ τὴν Κωμιτίσσαν διὰ ἕν βιβλίον, τὸ ὁποῖον ἐπροσταχθῆ ὅτι δὲν ἔμπορούσε νὰ τὸ διαβάση. ((One day, a young lady (the girl) asked the Countess about a book she had been told she could not read.))

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 22 September 1860

Dudbrook

Wet. ― (pouring small rain all day long ― till 4 P.M.) Worked very little at the Cedars: “packed.” ―

Called on P. Williams. ― He goes on well. ―― J. Gibson there. ―― Italian affairs very unsatisfactory. ―

Went to get my watch: bought “Essays & Reviews.” ― had my hair cut: ― & came home wet. ― At 3.15 cab to Shoreditch. 4.35 rail to Brentwood. Henry Wyatt on platform & Genl. Malcolm. ― Lady W.’s carriage to Dudbrook, Genl. M. Count of Paris & self. Count de Paris a very pleasant young fellow ― & somewhat like Holman Hunt. Dudbrook much enlarged. C.F. there ― always κάλλιστος. ((The best (GT).)) ― Lady W. only ― Mr. H. at Oxford. The Malcolms. H.J. Grenfell. 2 Miss Moneys & Miss Cifritt: little Constance Braham. ― Mr. & Lady ˆ[Horatia] Wardlaw & Lady Ida Waldegrave. ― & so dinner, Sir W. & Lady Smjjth, & Sir Charles & Lady Smyth & others.

Evening pleasantish: all ’at cards ― I looked over Photographs. ― C.F. sate with me late, as he generally does.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 21 September 1860

Cedars.

Particularly fine; ― not that that had much to do with me, only it was lighter. ― I intended to work, but Dickenson’s men came, & put up prints & pictures ― già erano in Corfu e Roma ((They were in Corfu and Rome before.)) ― on my walls. From 3 to 5 did a little at my Cedars ― & then rushed in a cab to J. Φιτζροι 1860-09-21.

Williams happily is better. Even he begins to think Rome is not safe. But he ridicules Spence & others who have great fear. On the whole P. Williams’s calmness & kindly temper in 10 weeks of blindness is highly admirable.

Back & at 7 dined at W.F. Beadon’s ― Only he & Mrs. B. ― he tired ―& weary: I hardly know yet if he will recover.

Long talk with Mrs. W.F.B. ― who used to live at Woolwich, & remembered that “nice & beautiful third daughter ― her name was Susan, ― of the Adml. at the Dockyard.” ――

I did too. ―

X9

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Thursday, 20 September 1860

Slept ill: indigestion ― & tendency to sore throat.

(X8)

Very fine all day, but the real winter chill seems to have taken possession of me. …… Rose at 7. Wrote to Cramer &c. ― & after post, which brought a nice letter from Mrs. Musters, ― to her, Ann, & P. Coombe. C.M. Church came to breakfast ― he is ever the same good Charles Church ― but years of Theology work their wills.

After he went I sorted drawings till 2: & worked at the oil Damascus till 4.30. Then to P. Williams, in a cab: he is better, & always cheerful. Miss ― I don’t remember her name, ― was bathing his eye, so for once I liked her: or “tolerated” her: ― and Gibson was there: & later, absurd Severn. ―

Came home, & found James Edwards ― but he was not in one of his good moods poor fellow: ― his “relazioni” with his father are sad enough. ― He walked with me towards the Strand, but could not dine. I, then, returning alone, dined at the Blue Posts wholly alone ―. Read of the defeat of Lamoricière & the altogether upside down-ness of Italian matters.

After having written this, Beadon asked me over there ― & lo! there was Henry Bruce ― (Sir T. Abdy & others ―).

Virtuously, I dressed & went ― & was glad to see Beadon better, & Bruce anyhow. ―

1860-09-20

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Wednesday, 19 September 1860

Alas! wet again. ―――― Caught cold in going across to the Commodo. ― Breakfast. All the pleasant memories of older times push back. … At 10.10 left, ― all these kind beings in the Hall ― & went in an open “shay” to Petersfield. A raw cold drizzle. ― Dim circle of days! ……

Beautiful country ― all around Petersfield. In Stratford Pl. by 1.40. ― Found the 3rd cabinet, & the new door ― & the 7 dozen Sicilian & other drawings.

At 4 went to see poor P. Williams ― who is better ― but I do not yet see a clear hope. [] ((Blot makes the name unreadable.)) Rawdon came in, kindly puffy-fluffy buffy-muffy. ― Returned & found Cheales ― a good nice fellow ― with whom towards Pall Mall at 7.

Dined at the O. & C. Club at 7.15 with C.M.C. ― Pleasant.

Cold & damply horrible air! Cab home! The blessed Littlegreen memories ― sounds & sights ― still bear me on.

Susan 13
Hugh ― 12Annie. 9
Phipps 7
James. 5 (knickerbockers & top boots.[)]

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 18 September 1860

Rose at 6 & read “Essays.” Letters from J. Edwards, poor P. Williams ― who is not so well. ― C. Church. ― & F.L. & Bright. Wrote to all ― & others. ― Mrs. Geoff came. Lunch. Clearer weather.

Walked out with W.H. & Jambo; towards Marden ― & saw Geoff ― absolutely the same as ever.

Then we 3 walked to Watergate, & over the Downs ― (the afternoon was fine ―) to Up Park, & through that, wh. is doubtless one of the loveliest spots in England ― to Littlegreen. ― Dinner. Mr. & Mrs. Langdale ― (ο ιερευς ((The priest.)) ) ― pleasant evening. I sang nonsense for the children: & afterwards much Tennyson for the elders.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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