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Monday, 28 November 1864

XX8

Bright ― fine, chill. Very remarkable & “excellent” brightness exists in Nice.

Accounts ― a bore always.

Letters, Dickenson: Anna Duncan.

No lamps appear as yet. The Daily Telegraph of the 25th appeared today: the 17th ― 22nd, & 24th ― have never come.

Worked hard from 10.30. (8 to 9 before breakfast.) to 4.

Walked at 4.15 ― to Villa Sacernò: Mrs. Seymour-Bathurst’s: ― she was particularly amiable to me 21 years ago in Rome.

Pleasant & well-bred ― & a Hankey ― which is enough. The daughter, an invalide, has a very winning & charming manner. A young man, one Somerset ― was there, & we walked back to Nice together: ―

Called at 5.45 ― on Mrs. (Webb) Hankey, & sate till nearly 7: certainly an [unaccountably] fascinating woman: nice little boy too.

She goes to Genoa tomorrow.

Home by 7. ― Dined at 7.30.

15th day of 240 Tyrants. Got through 2nd process of 15 ― 144 in all.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Saturday, 26 November 1864

Rain all day till 2.30 when it cleared.

Letter from Ellen.

Worked hard ― 8 to 9 ― & 10 to 3.

Then walked, taking G. with me to shew him various homes. Carabacel. &c. &c.: very dirty. Walked on the “marina” from 5 to 6.

6.30 to Mr. Lyon. Good dinner & pleasant evening. Talk of Sussex: how very queer! Dukes, & Poling, the Decoy ― Angmering, [Holince] &c. &c. &c. &c. ―: & especially of the Watkins: Deakin, as a little boy remembers Mr. W. & Mrs. W. as footman & ladies maid at Worksop!

1864-11-26

But, o the hs! ―
‘harouse the hair [―] hanimate the hatmosphere.’

14th day of 240 Tyrants ― through 2nd process of 12.
129 in all.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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2014 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 6,600 times in 2014. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 6 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

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Wednesday, 12 October 1864

Gray ― but always fine. Rose before 7 ― & did a good deal at times all day to the Campagna in spite of many interruptions, ― for

Mr. Prescott.
Underhill.
Martineau.
Mr. Morier.
Middleton ― all came. Bob M. is engaged to be married. Poor Mr. Morier is much aged. ― At 4 or 5 I walked out with G. Middleton ―& then to pay Bicker’s bill ― & to Foord’s ― returning at 7 to dine.

Dined μοναχῶς.

A letter came ― a bill for £2.2s,7d ― being the charge for the last, or Athens parcel of Crete things & paper ― which has arrived at Liverpool.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Thursday, 6 October 1864

Rose at 7. Clear fine all day ― not so cold quite.

Letter from Daddy Hunt ― to whom I wrote.[1]

At 10 ― the Contents of the 7. Corfu packages ― left on April 4 March 26th ― At Corfû. ―

No one article is missing ― but the little double saltcellar ― which, like the Philates sketch, is I fear foever gone. All the day ― nearly ― went in unpacking, arranging, & stowing away.

The Ithaca Penna Marina’s were all broken: & so I fear were the Lamps. It seems strange to see many of the old things ― their first Corfû memories being in 1855: ― Taylor’s table covers ― the spoons ― &c. &c. ―

Sir Paul & Lady Hunter came ― & later, Slingsby & Mrs. Slingsby Bethell, & little Violet.

Did not go out.

At 7.30 ―

1864-10-06

A most pleasant evening ― looking at Crete drawings: & it was nearly 12 before T.G.B. left.


[1] You can read the fun part of this letter at the Blog of Bosh.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Friday, 27 November 1863

Dark & dampy: but not wet or cold: ― dismal but beareable.

Many letters. 100 of the Subscribers have now paid ― but 230 more have to be written to!

No one came.

At 2.30 ― went to Gould’s ― to see Prince ― a good little man. But he was not at home ― though G. was: G. was less disgusting than sometimes ― but he is always a hog. E. Wilson’s remarx about him were really good ― as to how such a man could pourtray humming birds or anything refined. A queer fish.

Then to Dickensons. D. ages very much. The toil of English life is fearful ―― way what they may.

Then to Days ― seeing Mr. John ― ὅστις δὲν μ’ἀρέσκει.[1] He says 9 or 10 of the plates are all printed, I saw 4 or 4: not as I wished ― but cui bono to say anything??? They say all the printing shall be done by the 4th. ― Quien sabe?

Afterwards walked to Wilton Crescent & called on Mr. Carr ―. The servant said ― being a fooly man, ― “Mrs. Carr anxiously enquired if you had left any message Sir?” ― Ἀποκρίθην ― Οχι.[2]

Dined at the Blue Posts μ;πναχως.

& home by 7.

XX


[1] Whom I don’t like (NB).

[2] I answered ― No (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Wednesday, 21 October 1863

Finer ― dark at times.

Wrote to

Mrs. Clive, Mrs. Musters, & T. Fairbairn,

telling them I had resolved to stick to my original prices for the 4 pictures ― Cedars 735£ ― Masada 525£ ― Beirut 315£ [Pentedattilo] 105£[.]

Finished the Vignette.

Baring called ― & G. Cartwright: He is indeed much altered ― & no wonder. ―

4 more subscribers ― (125) ― to day.

At 4 ― called on poor A. Peel. out  ―& also Major Peel.

Walked till 6. ― then wrote envelopes for what dearest Ann called ― “a fresh attack!”

My memory of her last hours fades not at all.

Went to Barings. Mrs. T.G. Baring had a bad cold, but I shewed some drawings to her & Sissy.

1863-10-21

Evening thoroughly pleasant.

Home by 11.30


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Saturday, 11 October 1862

Slept ill, & rose late. No letters.

Worked very hard all day ― at Lady Strangford’s Masada ― & others. F.L. & “K.L.” called.

Hearing from Bright-Smith that the new tenant Mr. Oldham is to have the hall & stairs painted, I fume. ―

Walked a little from 5.30 to 6.

Dined at 6.45 ― with F. & K. Lushington: ― I don’t know if I talk too much, ― but the sad silence forces me so to do. ― There is much to be sad about. ―

Played alittle.

Sang a little.

Walked home.

X5


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Monday, 13 January 1862

Wonderful weather again. 1 ― but towards evening ― cloudier, yet always fine.

Did not go out all day. Unwell more or less[.]

Placed on canvass in outline ―
Courmayeur ―
Pont Pelissier
& Mer de Glace ―

Dined at 6.30.

(but, tho’ the Ἀτμόπλεον[1] came in at 5.30 ― no letters were given out.[)]

Penned out till 10 ― the last Egyptian sketches I have here.


[1] Steamer (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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