Category Archives: 1863

Thursday, 31 December 1863

Very dark, cold, & foggy. Ill ― & could not go out all day[.]

One payment. Wrote several letters: & arranged drawings ― papered them up &c. &c.

Lunched at 1 ― intending to try to go out ― but could not.

Lo! just as I was going to send Mrs. Willis’s book back, she called: & sent up “could I come down?” ― to which I responded No. But I let her have her book ― as it ain’t tanto[1] to quarrel.

Dined at home: reading Speke, ― wh. I don’t much delight in: dry ― & not always pleasant ― even apart from Drouth. ―

The year is dying. Let him die.
Old year! You shall not die!
You’ve lived with us so merrily![2]

Hum. Not so very merrily: but on the whole ― very happily.

 


[1] So much (value?).

[2] Tennyson, “The Death of the Old Year,” whose first stanza, however, reads:

Old year, you must not die:
You came to us so readily,
You lived with us so steadily,
Old year, you shall not die.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Wednesday, 30 December 1863

Cold ― & darky bright.

No payments ― rabbia.[1] ―

Packed ― from 10 to 1. or 2.

To Days ― & then paid bills & bothers & calls till 5. ― Found an impertinent note from Mrs. Willis, ― & instantly set off in a cab & clutched the book from 4. Hill St. Berkeley Sqre.

Dined alone.

Nice letter from Lady Goldsmid to day.

Wrote till near 10.

XX

 


[1] Anger.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Tuesday, 29 December 1863

Warmer again ― but damp. Very unwell.

One payment only. Set off at 10.30 to Waterloo Sation & at 11.10 to Leatherhead. Reading Kingsleys’ Water babies. ― At Ellens by 12.20. Mrs. Hinckson ― a niece of Mr. Newsom’s, ―there. A very grim & cold lady ― but then her aunt’s modes are not warm.

Ill ― & sleepy.

Dinner. poor Ellen’s deafness is very sad. At 3.15 ― I came away, not daring to say I could not come again, for poor thing, it was a great trial to her to part with me, even supposing as she did that I was coming again. It is a sad lonely life for her: & the winter seems dreary & long.

Walked to rail ―3.40. & came to Victoria ― changing at Croydon, ― by 5.20 ― a very long & tiresome journey.

Went to bed very early.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Monday, 28 December 1863

Much colder: gray ―: & some light snow.

20 letters ― 9 payments.

52 only now remaining unpaid.

Wrote answers, & at 12 ― went to Drummonds, & drew £400 ―with which cabbed to Mr. Scott of Bank Chambers ― & left it with him. Walked to Day’s ― & arranged about various things ― & back to Bank Chambers by 2 ― where I got £33 change & “accepted my stock.” So I have now 2000£ which is or seems absurd.

Cab to Pallmall, & walked home. [More] letters to answer. At 4 ― walked to Prince’s & T. Wyatts ― taking leave of him & Mrs. W. ― Back ― & wrote journal till 6.

Dined, μοναχῶς.

Enraged at martin sendin in a bill a second time.

XX


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Sunday, 27 December 1863

Much colder ― gray ― dry.

Breakfast at 9. ― a punctual house.

Sate reading ― & talking with Richd. Decie, who is a real good & wise fellow & kindly. Later ― a little walking ― but it was too cold ― & talking. Lady Doyle, & various Taylors called. Lunch. And talking till 3. Good-bye to all at 3.30, excellent kind Mr. & Mrs. Prescott ― & Bella & R. Decie & E. Wolstenholme. I have really never known such people as these, Combining wealth & simplicity, & immense kindliness: I have hardly ever heard a word said against anyone by anyone of them. However ― the end of seeing them for the present is come. ―

In town by 4.30 ―& shortly went to 37. Tavistock Place ― taking my book of Parrots as a Xmas gift.

1863-12-27

It really is wonderful to see Trelawny ― so vast & strong & full of tremendous energy, ― & yet to know he is the same Pirate of the “Young brother,[”] ― the same who burned the body of Shelley ― wh held the cavern of Parnassus with Odysseus ―who exumed Byron at Messolonghi ― who married Odysseus sister, & ran away with ˇ[Mrs. Harvey, formerly Lady Goring]!!!! ― He was full of talk especially of Napier (W.) ―& against Sir F., & Sir C. Adam, [of] which latter he said ― “I once spat in his face & kicked him ― when he put me in irons.” ― Of Thackeray he said a great deal unpleasant, yet I fear, true, partly ― as to gluttony & sottishness. Of Shelley (Sir P.) he said that “fool, blackguard & sot” ― of Lady S. “that nasty little foolish bitch.” ― Of Fairvairn, (who I found had consulted him about Ditcham, ―!) a blockhead: [Kostner], a “conceited ass.” ― & so with many more. A most strange & strongly character’d man. Wished the good D. Wyatt good-bye ― & walked to Regt. Circus with Mr. Trelawney ― who is far stronger than I am.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Saturday, 26 December 1863

Very mild ― but mizzly at times, & dark.

Rose at 7.30 & breakfasted with Mr. Reilly at 8, walking with him to Rail. Home by 9.30. Letters all receipts of Book. Wrote 6 or 7 notes & arranged some packing, & at 12.45 ― came again to Waterloo, ― Barnes, & Clarence by 2. Lunch. Sitting with Mrs. Decie, & walking about grounds, & planting Poultry till 5. Sitting windows, with the children & the rest. ― Dinner at 7.30.

1863-12-26

A something wonderfully pleasant party. Lady Frere is delightful.

Bed at 11.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Friday, 25 December 1863

Quite fine & mild ― lovely ― bright.

Thackeray is dead: ― he died yesterday.

Many letters: & wrote many: up till 12.30 ― resolving to go to Lewes & pass my Xmas with the Hunts. Packed, & left at 1 ― going first to Marlboro’ House. Thence to Victoria Station ― supposing the usual train to run at 2. ― but there was none, ― & the guard was angry, saying ― “Any Xtian all over the world might know Xmas day is like Sunday.” Evidently many others besides myself didn’t. Drove thereon to Waterloo Station, & came to Barnes. Walking to Clarence, where the most amiable=hospitable Prescotts ― tho’ I had previously declined coming ― received me with the usual welcome. Not withstanding I was alquanto cross I fear. We talked till 5.30[.] Dinner at 6

1863-12-25

Grew alquanto happier: & after dinner played & sang, tho’ badly.

Bed at 10.45.

Wonderfully kind people.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Thursday, 24 December 1863

Fine, & milder. A good many letters ― 2 payments.

Wrote several answers: ― wrote to Miss Gush, to Prince, ― & others. Went to days before 12 ― & paid his 559.15.6. To Bickers, & bought a copy of the Parrots to give Mrs. Digby Wyatt. To Maclean’s, who fixes the price of the “[Citadel]” at 3/6: but he is a soapy oombuggy man. ― Called to see Miss Yates ― but she couldn’t see me. Home ― & wrote again till 3.30 ― when I walked to Brompton.

Fanny Coombe seems to me sadly unwell

1863-12-24

Poor Fanny!

The Evening passed pleasantly.

Percy walked with me to Piccadilly.

Found letters ― (home by 10) one, by order of H.R.H. the Prince of Wales ― very nice.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Wednesday, 23 December 1863

Fine day ― all through.

Few letters. ― One payment, & later another. 70 yet to pay. Letter from Emma Parkyns ――――――――――

Went to Day’s ― the last of the 380 Subscribers’ copies goes out today. ― Looked over a magnificent collection of drawings made in India ― by Simpson. Returned at 2 ― & wrote 20 letters ― asking for subscriptions, book being received. ― Van Crake & his 2 boys came. ― At 4 ― went to the Lord C.’s ― but he had gone to Hackwood: & then to Slingsby Bethells ―: he had gone there too, but Mrs. S. was there. Heard a good deal of Craven & other matters. Saw her very nice little girl ― & the twins. So ―― no Hackwood for me: ― & I don’t know where to pass Xmas ― for it will not do to go to Teignmouth. Μόνος ― μόνος, πρέπει νὰ ἤμαι.[1]

At 7.30 ― to H.J. Bruce’s.

1863-12-23

Remarkably pleasant evening.

Afterwards sung ― but not well.

Home by 11. Found Day’s bill £559.15.6 ― including the Corfû prints.

 


[1] Alone ― alone I must be (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Tuesday, 22 December 1863

XX. Nevertheless resolved to go to the Penrhynbs & Yeatmans[.]

Bitterly cold. 22 Letters 2 payments. 20 ― returned receipts. Wrote till 11. then to Day’s: & at 12 to Waterloo, & so to Richmond. “Maimy” & her 8 children ― a 9th ahead. Mrs. Yeatman Senior also. Also “Emmy.” After luncheon I walked to Sheen ― & found Mrs. Penrhyn at home, but fancied she thought me a bore. Thereon, walked to Barnes, & at 3.37. to town. Drove to Westminster Abbey ― to get, if possible to A.P. Stanley’s marriage: but, having no card they would not let me in, & I could not see [Leycedin] Penrhyn, or Morgan Yeatman. ― So came away rather disgusted.

At 7. came W. Holman Hunt.

1863-12-22

A really delightful evening ― very rare now a days. Daddy’s account of the Fieldings. ― Discorso of art: J.M.: ― his plans: &c. &c. It was 11¼. Before he went.

Daddy always seems semi-fabulous to me ―: either quâ goodness ― or for depth of thought: conscientiousness; ― talent: &c. &c.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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