Category Archives: 1859

Wednesday, 21 December 1859

[XX9

Warmer. ― Cab to various places ― & at 12 to Leatherhead.

Poor Ellen! ―

Returned by 3.30 to London, & wrote & packed.] ((This passage appears in the page for 23 December, but would seem to describe what Lear did before getting back to London on 21.))

After returning from Ellen’s, I wrote, ― answers to many letters. ― Then at 5½ ― 7½ I made various shoppings & calls. ― At 7¾ ― 8¾ dined alone at the blue posts: ― regretting only that C.F. or F.L. did not come. ― The weather is warmer. Came home & wrote & packed till late.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 20 December 1859

Strange dream of life.

Various letters. ― Packed, & went off.

2 trunx by Dickenson. ―― Jones’s sent to “try on clothes” ― At 12 went out, leaving a Derry Down Derry at Massingberd’s. ―

Thence to Drummonds, whence I drew out 350£ & in a cab took “them” to the city. ― Mr. Scott, & the routine of the Dividends, wh. somehow to day seemed easy. ― Then I called on W.N. ― but all were away, ― so I returned to the Bells, & there I lunched. (O! dear kind Mrs. Bell! Now you worry me, & won’t let me sit anywhere but where you please! ―) Kinder & better people than these are not. The day is bitter cold but dry. Thence I walked home: ― wrote: ― & at 5 went over to N°. 9 ― to see Willie Beadon ― a nice lad, but he looks delicate. ― How curious is all the old fine “gentleman” blood! The lad is like a little model of every Norman lord. ― a nice good lad too ― by his face. ―― Then I walked to T. Wyatt’s ― where were Constance, Matt, & Harry, & Miss Miller, & later, Digby & his wife. I sang much. & at 11 came in a cab, with Miss M.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Monday, 19 December 1859

Far colder. ― most horrible. dark. ― black. ― Many letters: some very nice. ― One to say ― good true William Newsom is gone. ― He died yesterday at 11.

Let such as know his whole life say religion is nonsense, if they dare.

― At first I thought I would go down to Leatherhead at once: ― but, afterwards, I thought better to write. Ditto to Ann.

Then I went out to Drummonds, & various other places: & coming home at 4, packed & wrote till 6, when I went to C. Massingberd’s. His two girls were there ― very nice children. Poor C.M. ― He is a true & real man, & his history is very wondrous & sad. ― At 7¼ we dined at the Conservative Club ― very quietly & nicely, & sate talking till past 10 by the fire, about Lewis, ― Robinsons, Sutherlands, [Headfords], [Gorings], Sanders, Jenkinses, Duncans, James’s, Harringtons, Parrys, &c. &c. great world of people. ― I left C.M. with regret, he is a wide minded, soft hearted man. ―

Snow ― in all the streets. ―

Only the 27th Sept.r last, but William & Ellen N. were with me at Hastings!

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Sunday, 18 December 1859

Colder than ever. ― “Packed” & wrote.

At 1 called on Godleys ― (out) CocksSayers, ― & then walked to the Serpentine ― where thousands were skating, (wh. I wish Giorgio could see,) ― then to Barings, (out,) & Col. Hornbys ― who is unwell, ― & Massingberd: ― where I sate for an hour; ― he is a good kind fellow, but talked of the wretched death of Jack Jenkinson’s wife, by overdose of chloroform ―: & of the strange disappearance of Algernon M. from Lima. ― Then home to dress, & to the Somers Cocks ― where was only Colonel Cocks. Evening pleasant, though at first I was unwell. ― Cocks is always the most cheerful being on earth. The cold is most frightful.

X8

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 17 December 1859

X7

Most abominable & horrible cold! ― & pitch dark! Lamp nearly all day!! Yet in this fearful hell=world the inhabitants are too grossly  fixed in its disgusting terms even to perceive them! So the Sicilian beggar hugs his lice.

I wrote all day ― (except one 10 minutes when C. Fortescue came, kind fellow: ―) & applied to those of the 68 who had not paid their Fives. ― No further news of W.N. At 6 I went over to the Beadons ― & at 7 to dine there. Poor dear W.F. Beadon will not live long. How enraged I was with myself for speaking about ――― who, ―― had said “would not live long ― & that his limbs grew so weak. ―” How sad it is to be an ass, not to think befour won spekes!!

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 16 December 1859

O Lord! how cold! ――― rose at 8½ ― & at 9 breakfast. ― Thompson, Dr. Abney, Day, Beamont & one or two more ― very nice & pleasant, but I suffered horribly from cold. Then at 11½ Clark, who is kindness itself, went to the Fitzwilliam Museum ― & if the Bassæ got into the place I saw, it will indeed be well off. ― Then I went on ― (thick snow ever,) to Downing Coll.: & saw Dr. Worsley & Mrs. W.: kind good people. ― At 1/5 I took leave of Clark, having returned to Trinity, ― & came in a fly to Station. It was 2 before we left ― & the cold & deep snow were frightful. [―> Nothing is ― [gr.] than the combined effect of complete change of temperature added to violent & unusual motion ―, ― if applied to certain circumstances.] ― 5 before we reached town ― & then in a slow cab over slipping streets to Stratford Place by 6. Went to the Blue Posts & dined alone ― & returned at 7 or 8 to write.

X6

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Thursday, 15 December 1859

Snowy white, but not deep: bitter, but bright day cold. ― After breakfast came Rimbault, with whom ― (always pleasant & informing,) I walked to Chappells, & finished the 4 Idyll songs. Home by 11. Wrote & packed. In a gt. rage, because the servant sent away [Mamfrid] Packages ― supposing me out. ― At 12 came in cart ― slippery streets ― to Kings Cross: ― too early ― & walked up to Pentonville. At 1.45 off to Rail: nice gentlemanly fellow who had been in Corfu &c. &c. ― & at Compiègne last Xmas. Must talk with him, who was a Craven, married to Lady York. ― Horrible cold as the day went on & at 4.30 at Cambridge ― it was hardly bearable. Buss to Trinity, & found Clark as dinner was commencing. Nearly dead with cold, but revived. Prof.ssor Thompson sat opposite, & also Beamont. ― Dinner good ― wine ditto. ― [Comb  rose], Whewell, Sedgwick ― & others. Much talk with Clark, who is very pleasant & good. Then, to Thompson’s rooms; tea & cigars, & a deal of pleasant talk. O! Eh! but the passages & bitternesses of cold!! Happily however, I had no Asthma ― or little. At 11 C. took me to a delightful little room ― very warm, so I am very happy at Cambridge in my 2nd visit.

Nearly 10 years ago I came down with Kirkpatrick to see F.L.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Wednesday, 14 December 1859

Bright ― & dry ― but horribly cold!

Very charming letter from Fitz Jacson-Widdrington.  Afterwards ― wrote to Morier, Heywood, Langton, Tatton, Henry, & Sir W. James, which 6 ― if they subscribe will wind up my list should F.L.’s friends do the same.

Ἔπειδα, I went out ― & called on C.L. Massingberd, who is always a nice fellow: he went with me to Foords & there was the “Bassæ,” among other matters: newly framed & glazed, & looking famously. There are some cracks, which bother me. Leaving C.L.M. I went to Windsor & Newtons ― &c. &c. ― & home. The cold is dreadful. At 3½ or 4 I walked out to Stanford, where I bought a Globe for Percy Coombe &c.

(This morning I saw poor Col. Hornby in St. James’s St.)

Then, through the crowded Strand & Cheapside, to the Bells. Only Professor & Mrs. B.: ― what can be more truly kindly than they & their ways? ― Olives ― Later, sang Idylls. Cold piercing. [gr.].

X5

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 13 December 1859

Dark & foggy but dry ―: later lighter.

Poor darling Ann came at 10: ― she seems pretty well: but Dickenson coming to hang those Civitella, Lydford, & Pentadilo, & many other matters, interrupted the day sadly. Yet perhaps it was as well, ― for the leaving me is always a sad task for poor dear Ann.

She went at 3.

I went out: taking 28£ to Drummonds, & the other shoppings, ― returning at 6.
Letter from Miss Duckworth ― dear old Lady! how well one remembers her pleasant evenings!

― At 7 I went to the W. Beadons. W.F.B. is apparently better for the time ― yet I suppose he gradually fades. A son of Cecil Beadon was there ― a youth from college: ― somewhat of talent all the Beadons have. W.F.B. is certainly a very delightful man: so much taste & so various: ― with so manly & English a decision of character. “Jessie” is better just now ― but he has not gained, somehow, by years: ― a kind of dreamy effulgence prevents much consecutive converse. ― Later I sang ― but B. fell asleep ― poor fellow: ― & Mrs. B. is not one to whom songs can always be sung. ―

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Monday, 12 December 1859

Sill colder: awful. I don’t think I could ever bear this home again in cold weather.

Letter from Mrs. Waite ― poor W.N. remains the same. ― At 9.40 left ― & was in London by 11½ or 12. ―― Several letters ― & some to answer. Then called on Foords, & at W. & Newtons, & then to Holman Hunt’s, whose picture is nearly done now. What a genuine man is that! ― Gambart came ― a bore ― & we had to go.

I returned to Stratford Place: & am writing till it is time to go to the Blue Posts. ―

I can hardly hope to get off this week.

At 8 I went to the Blue Posts, & dined with C. Fortescue who is in better force than usually in these days.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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