Thursday, 29 September 1864

Always fine. So lovely a year I cannot quite remember ―― but one sees it chiefly thro’ chimney tops.

Dickenson came ― & took order about the paper to be mounted for the 1865 drawings: also 2 small wings of bookscase.

T 12, I walked to Coutts’s, & got good king Fairbairn’s cheque for 157.10 ― changed. Cab back. Then paid endless bills ― & walked to the Westminster Deanery, but A.P.S. being away at 6 Grosvenor St. I walked there, but they were out. Back ― wholly tired & sad ― by 5 ― slept & played till 7. ˇ[Met Boyd.] At 7.30 came Wade-Browne ― in a foolish mood. After all, with all his cheeriness, he is silly, or seems so at times, ― & too fine.

1864-09-29

[Since writing this journal, I have read of this day last year’s ― at Dudbrook ― & far more miserable parà τουto.]

But the dinner was a mortle failure! ― All the Oysters might have been good, by Brown took one he said was bad, ― (the first he ate,) & ate no more. ― The cutlets were not as good as usual; ― the hare was really good ― but mancava[1] stuffing: & the partridges were totally horrid, & had to be sent away ― tho’ B. ˇ[had] said they ought to be good at just this day. And to crown all, Cooper hadn’t got a fresh apple pie ― but had “warmed up” that of yesterday, so that I saw the poor Guardsman shudder. ― I, being tired & unwell couldn’t throw fun into all this, but had to let things take their way. So I played, & shewed “Roberts’s Holy Land,” ― & at 11. B. elapsed. I shall not ask him to dine again: ― the arrangements do not fit ―[2] [“]how can my (notions) longer mix with thine?” ― B. said, ― Craven, when he heard that he, (W.B.) was going to dine with me, used to say ― “O! then you will have a very Pre-Raphaellite dinner ― very minute.” But Craven was a pig & an ass. Q.E.D.


[1] There wasn’t enough.

[2] The entry continues at the bottom of the facing page, for 30 September.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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