Monthly Archives: March 2014

Thursday, 24 March 1864

X. Same muggy calm weather ― dim.

Sent off 2 more cases for England ― one with books & a case of drawings ― the other with Iánina & canvasses.

Penned out till 1. ― Close muggy ― dim weather ― all distance obliterated.

Set out at 2.15 ― intending to go with Giorgio to finish the drawing at Εὐροποῦλος ― but the Italian Steamer being signaled, I went alone. But I never got farther than Potamo bridge ― dogs bothering me, & disinclination & apathy abounding.

Having “sate upon” the bridge for 1 hour & a half, I returned, ― meeting G. about 5.30.

He had 2 letters, containing 6. ― 3 from Drummonds, reporting payment by R. Bethell of Sir A. Horsfords & Mr. H. Edwards’ subscriptions, Mrs. Willis ― & Lord Rendlesham: so there should now be 155£ in Drummonds ― deducting my last drawing out of 45£.

Returned to dine at 7. on Κρύο Δίνδιο,[1] & to read papers.

G. has gone to his mothers: Χριστός ― poor fellow, was the same today.

The other 3 letters were from Emma Arnold, P. Bouverie, & Mr. Marsden.

 


[1] Cold [?].


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Wednesday, 23 March 1864

XX Nice letters today from Bulwer, Massey, & Lane.

Mrs. Levett is dead!

Bad days. And the weather is all milky-cloudy gray ― mountains invisible, I sit, open window, ― penning out Zante drawings ― with a fire: dim gloom, sorrow, hesitation & uncertainty abound.

Col. Wright & a Capt. Farmer came. Χριστός no better.

At 4.30 ― ἀναχώρισα[1] ― and meeting the Elmsherits, they told me a bog xplosion was to happen at Fort Abraham at 5.30. Whereby I sate on a wall till it occurred. ― These things are a bore: ― for a great people, we are singular bunglers.

Walked partly to Ascension. Gray the olives are, yet minutely clear & beautiful in dark gray. Certainly no place on earth is so lovely.

So I came back by 7. G. had a good dinner for me ― to last 3 days ― a Turkey & baked potatoes, & “Τζικαράτου” pudding.

At 9 I sent him home: it is better that old Βασίλια should not be so quite alone, with her dying son Χριστός. “Ha sofferto molto in questi 3 anni ― la madre.”[2] “Ὑπόφερε πολυ, ἠ μήτηρ, ‘ς ταύτους τοῦς τρία χρόνους, διὰ τὴν ἀῤῥωστείαν τοῦ Χριστοῦ.”[3]

It is a pity that Σπίρο has become so little a part of the family.

I have resolved to send off 2 other cases to England, ― & they go tomorrow.

What a thoroughly gray sciroc day! Yet I am glad of fires at night.

 


[1] I departed (NB).

[2] She has suffered greatly in the last three years ― the mother.

[3] She has suffered greatly, the mother, these three years, because of Christos’s illness (NB).


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Tuesday, 22 March 1864

Sent letters to Dickenson, Ellen, & Mr. Edwards.

Gray & cloudy ― & cloudier ― rain aperiently eminent. The remaining Trieste boat came ― but brought nil for me: ― nor ― the Italian Alexandriam. ――

Violent indigestion & misery XX.

τό Ζωή![1]

Drew Fort Neuf out of winder. Hoped to have gone to Εὐροποῦλος ― but it is all dark & gray without, & I within!

I have ordered dinner at Carter’s on this account. ― Penned out Zante drawings ―. Salvador & hills all invisible.

Paced & paced the rooms ― now nearly empty ― till 7. The music below a compensation for much i[ll][2]

Went to Mrs. Carter’s to dine ― a party of 5 Lieuts & Middies ― very funny jolly. One was a son of Rev. Cleugh of Malta & Godson of Lady : Chichester. All, finding I was Derry-Down-Derry, were elate. Good human beings is Middies. Returned to pen out till 11.

G. tells me Χριστός is worse ― perhaps dying.

 


[1] This life (η Ζωή, NB).

[2] Blotted.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Monday, 21 March 1864

See 2 pages ahead.[1]

Gray & calm all day.

Sent pictures off.

Went to Taylor’s ― to get change for cheque. J.W. Taylor is sad ― he was born here in 1821. ― Old Mr. Ragnanean was ― there, ― & older Mr. Woodhouse ―― how very bad all this!! ―

Came home, & off & on penned out Zante drawings,

At 2, Luigi the Zinkious man came, a fat & worthy soul: ― & so, before 5 ― 4 packages were done up & ready. The Case of pictures ― drawings went to Woodley’s this morning.

At 7.30 to De Veres.

1864-03-21

Pleasant, ― at least I was ― for [once] ― enjoyful. And later I sang from In Memoriam &c. Home by 12.

Found a letter from T. Cooper ― announcing 6 having been sent ― but none are come! Pleasant.

 


[1] The entries for 19 and 20 March had been written in the pages for 21 and 22 March, so the entries for 21 and 22 March are written on the pages for 19 and 20 March.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Sunday, 20 March 1864

Gray & calm.

Resolved to pack quicker, & get off next Saty if possible. It is a gloomy odious bore, this going. ―― Wrote to Ellen, Mr. Edwards, Cooper, & Dickenson.

At 2, I went, by the Ghetto to De Vere’s. Luncheon solo, as they were lunching below, but little Mary came & talked. Afterwards, D.V. & Mrs. D.V. ― After discourse on “Corfu Lunatics,” ― at 4. we walked out ― by the “Ward” road, & to the Cemetery & the old Temple=church, & along all the garden meadow ― (where F.L. & I went to walk so often,) to Calechíopulos, & so up, by the orange-gardens to the One gun road, & so back by 6.30. ― These walks with the De Veres are very delightful ― but, ending, ― better less thought of. ― They go to the Isle of Wight. ―

At 7.15 ― to the 7.30 Palace Dinner. H.E. more excited than usual ― knowing more than we do. A bad new paper just published ―: the Gk. Ministry out ― & illuminations thereat &c. &c.

1864-03-20

Eh! those gardens! O! that lake & those olives!!!!!!!

Amusing & pleasant evening. But things do not seem in a pleasing state.

Went to Baring’s rooms afterwards.

Found my Iron Bedstand &c. all cleared off, & the small long camp bed in its place.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Saturday, 19 March 1864

Gray ― gray ― gray ― all day long: gleamy only at times. And, sooth to say ― cold, ― so that, ἀφίσωντα διὰ τρία ἑβδομάδα[1] fires, I have took to them again. March is March εἰς ὃλον τὸν κόσμον.[2] After 9 ― I went to Courage’s, & got £6.6.0 ― being Mr. Campbell Johnston’s book money. ― Says Mr. C. [“]We think there will be a civil war all over the island, when the last of the English have gone.” ― ‘But’ say they ― we cannot move: how can we? ―― Then I went to Mr. Woodley ― who seems a jolly sort of man; he is to send my first case to Lpool as soon as he can ― by the Tripoli if possible ― if not, by the next ― on [Bibbig]. ―― & he says he will take charge of my other 6 or 8 cases to send as I may devise. ―

So I returned at 11 ― & packed ― packed ― & packed, till all my things were in the zinky packages ― excepting those I take. Austrian Steamer in ― but alas! no letters. At 4.30. walked out. ― quiet but gloomy afternoon, as often is March ― the mountains dark gray & purple ― yet how vastly glory-grand! ― Went by the Parga & Condi road, but not to the flats ― returning, ― & soby the Poplar cross round to Καστράδες. The old Βασίλια came & talked, & Τατιανὲ brought (ἂκων) λάμπσι:[3] (a compliment more honored in the breach &c. &c.). ― Home by 7. & dined at 7.30 on Lamb roast & stewed celery, & orange marmalade & rice, & olives. ― Also, penned out till 10.30. ―

Fires tonight ― first time for 3 weex.

Awful mistake ― this is for March 19.[4]

 


[1] Leaving [fires] for three months (NB).

[2] Around the world (NB).

[3] (Involuntarily) light (NB).

[4] This entry is written on the page for Monday 21 March.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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Friday, 18 March 1864

Rose before 8 ― & packed winter clothing, ― breakfast ― & then ― packed at times all day long. Saddish weary work.

Did not go out. The day was fine & blue cloudy ― with the port full of incident, cattle landing, & porpoises to wit.

But cui bono? all is passing. How to arrange ― as to taking or sending or leaving things I know not.

Dined at 7. ― & penned out Zante drawings till 10.30.

Giorgio is unwell from bad cold for 3 days past. “È una seccatura,[1] βέβαιως, αὒτη ἡ ζωή μας:[2] ― ma non si può muore tutto in uno, e bisogna far il meglio ed aspettar l’ora.”[3] ― Which reminds me of the (ἂχορος, ἂλυρος[4] ―) of the Colonas. Ever the Viviani melodies ― such music as is seldom heard. ―

 


[1] It’s a real bother.

[2] Surely, this life (NB).

[3] But one cannot die [“muore” for “morire”] all of a sudden, and one must do his best and bide one’s time.

[4] “Without dance or lyre.” Nina adds: “This is a reference to Oedipus at Colonus: The Helper comes at last to all alike, when the fate of Hades is suddenly revealed, without marriage-song, or lyre, or dance: Death at the end. Translation: Sir Richard Jebb.”


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3. Image.]

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