Monthly Archives: March 2012

Monday, 24 March 1862

Perfect calmness & brightness all day.

Slept ― for a wonder ― the first for many a night: in the room next to study.[1]

Worked at Jánina ― till 1. when the Maude noises began, & drove me away. ―

Sent 3 green frogs & 2 Trap Spiders to Mrs. Naylor. It grieves me to see so little of Miss Goldsmid ― but what else can I do?

At 2.30 ― Letters from F.L. ― & William Lushington ― both delightful: the latter particularly, ― & unexpected ― also from Dickenson, ― the 2 pictures were in the Exhibition International.

“Sta a veder”[2] ― as Giovannino the good used to say.

Went to Ascension at 3, & drew in those wondrous olive-groves till 6.15. ― Golden sunset. ―

Home by 7.15. Dined at 7.35.

Penned out till 10.30.

Letter writing out of the question ― yet if one had but a days ― a whole day’s quiet!! ―

Karalambi is better.

 


[1] This paragraph appears after the next one, circled and connected to this position by an arrow.

[2] Wait and see.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Sunday, 23 March 1862

Lovely fine again.

No sleep last night: that disgusting little ass walking about, & his dogs fleacing themselves all night. So I had my bed moved once more: ― the length & strength of suffering of this winter through this noisy house! ― Post brought a letter from Lady Waldegrave! ― & the Sat. Review.

Bad headache from upstairs noise ― so could not write. But I penned out somewhat.

At 2 called on the Decies, where were Luards & De Vere ― & we are all to dine at the Casino ― for the last time all together. Staid with them till 3 ― then to church. ― The New Genl. Always goes to church. Clarke said of him ―― “this General keels! ― I never knew that Generals knelt!” ―――

Craven preached ― & well. ――

Came home, & penned till 6. Then to Luard, & with him to the Casino. Extremely pleasant dinner ― the 2 Decies, ― Majr. Buchanan ― Luard, I, & De Vere padrone[1] ― very merry by [rise].  Discourse of “Beef” & “Mutton,” ― which was best. ― Afterwards sang a good deal. The D.s & B. went at 10.20 ― Luard & I staid till 11.20. Home by 12. ―

Beef ― Roast Mutton ― roast
Boiled Boiled
Steamed hashed Hashed
Salt Irish stew ―
Steaks Haricot
Tea Broth.
Ox tail soup Pie.
Marrow bones ― Chops
minced veal. cutlets ―
Pie brains ― head
Calves foot ―
Jolly

 


[1] Landlord, or master.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 22 March 1862

Violent storms ― thunder & lightning & rain till 2 or 3 ― afterwards ― calmer ― with rain at times: fine at sunset.

Little or no sleep last night. The noise of the people below & above, ― & at 2 or 3 A.M. a storm of wind, & corresponding fuss of doors & sportelli.[1]

G. came in at 6 or 7. Καραλάμβι is doing well.

Worked very hard all day at Olympus & not badly ― apparently ―― going up only to see the Cravens, at 2. ―

Did not go out at all: worked till 6.15.

Dined at 7.30[.]

Penned out till 10.30.

(Lerici & S. Erenzo drawings.)

Neither the Alexandria nor the Ancona boat in. ― no nothing.

X7

 


[1] Window shutters.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 21 March 1862

Quite gray all day ― & as if it would rain.

Painted at Fairbairn’s Florence ― (but irregularly & not very well: houses ― duomo ― hills.) up till 6.15. Lunching at 2 ― Sir C. Sargent calling, & sitting a while. I fancy one likes him as well as ever one would could or should.

XXX6

No end of indignation & bother: & afterwards, of dim sight ― & weary nerves.

Did not go out at all.

Dined at 7.30. The Maudes tolerably quiet.

But, Giorgio told me that he had just heard of Karalambi being ill ― the Measles I fancy ― for 2 days ― only they sent yesterday when we were away.

So he is gone to Kastrades ― “I like to give him his medicine me:” ― says the good man. I trust the boy will get well.

Penned out Lérici drawings ― till nearly 11. ― This time last year ― at Freshwater; & sad enough.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Thursday, 20 March 1862

Gray early ― but lovely after 10. ―

Rose at 6.45. Breakfast ― & at 9 ― off, with G. ― to the Hotel St. George ― at 9.30, with Miss Goldsmid & Mrs. Naylor to Palaiokastritza ― wh. we reached at 12.20.

Very lovely bay & rox!

We lunched in the Monastery ― & afterwards saw the bones of an old wale [sic], & prowled about the sands till 2.45. Very beautiful place. Recollections of 2 other times here. ― Drive back. Inside worried by coach=movement, & nerves by restraint.

Walked by Potamo road ― home by 7 ˇ[6.15] ― seeing Craven on the way.

Dined with Miss G.: ― a pleasant evening ― yet ― yet ― yet.

Home by 10.15.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Wednesday, 19 March 1862

Very fine.

Worked ― 9.30 to 1.30 ― at Florence. ―

Then Miss Goldsmid & Mrs. Naylor came.

After wh. lunched ― & worked till 4. ―

At 5 ― walked, by Παλαίοπολις, to Ἀνάλειψις ――― where I prowled about among the darkling gray olives: aperiently that is one of the loveliest spots on Earth.

Home by 7. Dined 7.30[.]

Penned out till 10.30[.]


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 18 March 1862

Fine all day & calm & warm ― but cloudy at times.

Worked ― particular ― from 9.30, to 6. ― (only stopping to read the Observer & Punch, sent by Miss Goldsmid[)] ―― Mr. Clive’s illness distresses me much. ―

Worked at the Olives & vines & fig in the large Florence. ―

Did not go out till 6.50 ― when I went to Luard’s, & dined with him. A very pleasant evening, barring that Bass’s ale was a leetle too strong for me ― cum καπνήση.[1]

Penned out, No. 17 ― Spezzia 1860 tour.

Home by 11.20.

 


[1] Nina writes: “the closest word I can find is κάπνισις which means (more or less) ‘being in a smoke filled environment,’” which might well be the meaning Lear intended.


[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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