Monthly Archives: November 2010

Friday, 23 November 1860

Masada 6th day

A fog ― white.

No letters.

Wrote to Williams & Spillman.

Worked at Masada ― 11 to 4.

No walk.

Called on Capt. & Mrs. Huish. Nice people.

Felt very well. Dined.

Penned out Ζαγώρι.

Greek till 11.

Middle of day bright & fine ― but fog again at 4.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Thursday, 22 November 1860

Masada 5 day

Very mild sunny ―springlike day.

No morning letters. From 9.30 ― to 4 ― worked hard on the large Masada. ― Letters from J. Harford, & W. Chappell. ―

Walked 4 to 5.30 ― (moon ―) by the dry roads & along commons: ― the number of walks here is delightful.

Dinner, alone. ―

Hum. the day is lone: ― pretty well for that ― but I am not very disgusted ― one is so comfortable here.

Evening: penned Zagori & Thucydides.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Wednesday, 21 November 1860

Masada 4th day

Rose as usual ― but cross: ― this life is gone back to the bi=bad days. ― Bother.

No letters.

Morning fine ― but rain at 12. After 4 frightful wind & torrents ― howlings. Did not go out all day.

Capt. Huish & Mrs. H. came ― & Miss Howard: intelligent & pleasant people.

Worked at Beirût till 3 ― foreground. Then an hour at Masada.

5 to 6 Greek ―. Dinner.

8 to 9½ penned out Ζαγωριτεκὰ. ((Villages of Zagori (NB).))

Greek & journal till 10.30 or 11.

No letters from Giorgio ― whom I sometimes absurdly expect to see suddenly. In reality, I suppose he is at Πατράσσος ((Patras.)) ― or εἰς τὰς Αθῆνας. ((In Athens.))

I think a head (sic) as little as possible ― doing all I can to collect & concentrate thoughts for what I am doing ― then 12 Ζωγραφία. ((Painting (NB).))

X11

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 20 November 1860

Very calm & fine all day ― & a wonderful sunset.

Rose at 7.15. ― Arranged to go on with Interlaken.

Letters from Ann, Foord, & Lady Bethell.

No newspapers. ― Wrote a letter to Sir R.B. ― asking him to mention the 2 Palestine pictures to Rothschild, ― but did not send τοῦτο τὶ γρᾶμμα. ((This letter (NB).))

At 12 came Mrs. DavidsonLady Montefiore’s sister, a singularly handsome elderly lady: ― she came with Miss Dent & an attendant ― gonfiata senza dubbio. ((Blown up, no doubt.))

Very pleasant & kind & ‘courteous:’ but wholly without observation. She sate herself opposite the Cedars ― & looked at them barely once, then turned & said ―Do you take portraits? ― & then talked of her 6 sons. I showed her “Jerusalem” ― & she said, ah! ― oh ― yes ― & talked on as before.

When she went I worked at Interlaken. But at 3 came Mr. Sayer ― & I fancy wishing to come here ― odd enough. Mrs. S. Mrs. Shakespear & Ida are all unwell. ― At 4.30 I walked to Weybridge Station with him. Dined alone: penned out.

Reading ― “What will he do with it?” ―

μὲ πολὺν ἐυχαρίζησιν ((With great pleasure.))

X10

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Monday, 19 November 1860

Queer ups & downs. ― Very pleasant, placid nice day ― out & in. Fine out ― bright, calm, summery.

Rose at 7.15 ― setting palette on, before breakfast.

Worked at Bethlehem. A Mrs. Davison (in the Hotel,) sends, wishing to see the Lebanon picture ― & she turneth out to be sister of Lady Montefiore, & aunt of Rothschild ― whom I so wish to see these pictures. ― Queer quincidence. ― Worked till 3.30 ― when it was so bright I went out, ― & walked to Weybridge ― that English place ― & past L. Philippes & the Duchess D’Orlean’s tombs ― & so about the common. Very pleasant. ― Dinner at 6. ― & a note from Mrs. Davison, saying she’ll come tomorrow, ― so I wrote to say ― con piacere. ((With pleasure, i.e. “I’ll be happy to see you.”))

Comes Cokayne ― & says Mrs. D. is all wrong in the head, & at times “werry bad” ― so I hope she won’t franticate tomorrow & run a muck at my painting.

Something today must have put my digestion all right ― perhaps the reaction from from Saturday ― & yesterday.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Sunday, 18 November 1860

Perfectly glassy clear & bright!

Breakfast at 8 & walked to rail at 9.

Ἄσχημος κὰι ασθενῆς. ((Ugly and ill (NB).)) X

Bore!

To Stratford Place: & found a letter from C.F. very nice.

Bus to Angel ― & walk by Highbury to Woodberry.

Only W.N. & Susan Head.

Willie is better ― (but it was scarlet fever,) & at Gresham St.

Afternoon immensely happy ― & so brilliant & beautiful! ― At 4 in pony chaise to St. John St. ― & cab to Waterloo Station.

Young middy in carriage ― who took out lots of chocolate to give a little child: ― a nice English boy. He had been at Corfû & to Crimea in the “Hannibal” ― & at Australia in the “Abu? dair? ――――― ?[”]

He was a well-informed & pleasant lad!

Moonlight. Walked to Hotel.

Bed early. ―

X9 ((This X is connected to the one above in the page, presumably indicating a single attack.))

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 17 November 1860

All day long unceasing pouring rain: only about 4 it snowed hailed & sleeted. ― My plan of town going being upset by the weather, rose at 7.15 & sent a note to P. Cooper, ― telling him to send letters as usual. ―― Letters from Gussie Bethell, & Mr. Hay’s servant. That poor man goes to Paris today ― but I cannot think he will live! ―

Painted at Philœ ― & later S. Sabbas: & at 4 walked to Library to buy paper. The only way is to work off these incubi. ((Nightmares.)) ― I worry at times at my hearing of George ― but hope he is employed somewhere. ― At times I think of a plan for him to quit my service ― i.e. ― that I should pay him one year’s wages ― & leave him thenceforth to get work in his own country. For he could not come here ― & chance, & my increasing age are against my employing him there. ― thank God, my health now is far better than I ever knew it in November. ― And as for loneliness ― that one must put up with to the end of the chapter: only, it is not right to cause any worry to others. ― A month or 6 weex hence will shew more distinctly what I can, & have to do. Reading back, there has been a deal o’ work done since January 1.

At 6 dined; the tedious Mrs. Jones there: ― & a queer old man. And a Miss Howard, “a hauthoress” says Cockayne[.]

Read Bulwer’s, “what will he do with it?” ――

Penned out Zagóri sketches calmly till 11.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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