Monthly Archives: October 2010

Sunday, 21 October 1860

Fine, gray ― “autumnal” ― all day.

Breakfast ― having risen at 6.30 ― & drawn “Beirût” till 8.

At 10 Mr. W. Tottie, & the elder Raleigh came to see these drawings. Both are pleasant & intelligent: Raleigh is a curiously interesting fellow. ―― Afterwards, I sate & drew till 1. ― Ποῖ, ((Italian “poi,” then.)) ― lunched. ―

Then, walked with W. Raleigh ― over St. George’s hill. Damp the day ― & gray ― & I not well: but the conversation of the youth made me forget it. ―

To Byfleet, & Addleston ― & so the Hotel by 6.

Very merry dinner at the table d’hôte. (Queer man Cooper: & discussions about tabledhôteism afterwards.) ―

The 2 brothers Raleigh are certainly the most interesting “youthful Anglosaxons” one has met for a long time.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 20 October 1860

Very fine. One of “those October days.”

Drew a little from 7 to 8 at “Jerusalem” of Musters.

Breakfast. ― Letters from Mrs. Musters ― & Mrs. Parkyns. ― & C.F. Wrote to the 2 former.

Drew till 11. Went with Mrs. W. Tottie & others to see the “Cedars” at Mr. Lyle’s: ― & afterwards shewed drawings.

Dickenson’s man then came ― & about 12 or 1 or later, went with him to see about those pictures, relatively to the “American” rooms. ― The rooms would do ― being sunny, & spacious, &, although I have written about the Freshwater, yet I did not know of these. But it was uncertain if I could get my picture up, so I tried the lid of the case ― “Ford” & Redford carrying it thro’ the meadows. It just went in, so I took the rooms from Nov. 1 for 5£ a week, including brand. ― At 3 or 4 ― returned, & then brought the picture to the Hotel. ― Afterwards ― drew a little ― & finished ― I hope, ― the 5th Musters drawing. Then, a fine sunset, walked to the Cobham road, & returned at 6. ― Before dinner, ἐτραγώδησα μερικὰ τραγωδία ((I sang some songs (NB).)) ―: dined ― cheerfully: ― & afterwards sang a good deal. ― It is a cheery party. The lively idle Irishman Cruse ― the shrewd lively elder Raleigh, & the deep & rather sad younger brother: & several more ― Miss Cochrane the American, ― the Totties &c. &c. ― made a pleasant lot. Bed at 11½.

1860-10-20

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 19 October 1860

Rose at 7.

Baalbek ― Musters’s, is nearly done.

Letters from F.L. ―― E. Drummond. ― Lady Reid. J. Edwards ― &c. all requiring answers. ―

Tried to work at the everlasting Musterisms ― but could not. Gave it up. & at 1 walked to Walton ― calling in at Lyles, & arranging things to move away. The C. Lushingtons were “out:” ― & then I called on the J. Lewis’s. In half an hour I was all cayenne ― that vulgar sneezing snow is so utterly horrid ― & the more from the contrast with that sweet woman. Certainly, knowledge & general superiority of talent never wore as unamiable a form as in John Lewis! ― Of Daddy Hunt he spoke most odiously ― doubting the price of his picture ― (till I was positive about it,) & lessening him before Millais’ ― & vilifying some of his works ― the whole secret of all being that he knows at 60 he is not Daddy’s equal who is 32. ― I came away angry ― but sorry for poor Mrs. J.L. ― Thence I went to Hewitsons, who, in his lawn, & with his plants, is pleasant. ― & I am very glad to have known him, albeit he thinks very little of my poor Cedars ― & haply is right. ― I packed all my things & resolved to go ― for there are various things rile me here: ― so at 4 or 5 I was ready to start. And then came a note from Gussie B. saying they are off to Brighton ―― so I am here nailed for 3 days. With lots of notes ― C.F. J.B.E. ― Ann, Dickenson &c. ― at 5 walked to the Common & up & down till 6. ― Dined at Table d’hôte: sate by Lee & J. Raleigh: ― a really nice pleasant clever youth. I suppose indeed that it would not be common to find so many people at a table d’hôte so “far from unpleasant.” ― Gradually I have become less “irritable.” ――

Worked from 8½ to 9½. ―

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Thursday, 18 October 1860

15th day ― Cedars

Slept till 7. ―

Dark, windy, & wet day.

Worked at the picture ― but came away at 3. ― Letter from H.J. Stansfeld,  with a 30£ cheque.

Wrote to him.

Drew at Baalbek till 5. ―

Then dined.

And worked till 8 or 9.

Slept ill.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Wednesday, 17 October 1860

Cedars ― 14th day.

Finer, but colder, & windier. Morning very fine; so I drew Cedar edges & tops from various places ― thereby catching cold. ― Went to the picture, & got it off its 4 tubs on to the ground again. But I was very unwell ―

X7

& soon came away.

Dined alone early ― i.e. ― 3 ― & then drew till 5 ― (Baalbek,) when I lay down, I couldn’t get up again. ―

XX8

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 16 October 1860

Cedars 13th day

Sent letters to Mrs. EmpsonMacbean, ― W. Beadon, Mrs. Wyatt ― & Lady Bethell. ―

Rose at 6.30 ― it is hardly light earlier now: ― & worked till 8.15 on “Baalbek.” ―

Breakfast. 2 nice letters ― from T.G. Baring, ― asking me there: ― & from Gussie Bethell ― asking for Autographs. ― So I sent her Hallam Tennyson’s ― Count de Paris’s, & Holman Hunts. ―

The rain poured in torrents from 6 to 9. ― I went to work at 10: ― & it rained till 1. At 3 it became fine.

The picture went on very tolerably: but: πρέπει νὰ ὀμολογήσω — ὁ Κύριος Λαιλ εἶναι μὰλλον ((I must admit ― Lord Lyle is rather (NB).)) a bore. Returned at 5 ― & walked a little: but my foot having been hurt on Sunday week ― I can’t walk fast ― so got cold. ― Altogether I am rather uncomfortable tonight, ― I got into a gate, thinking it led to the Hotel, when a furious female rushed out ― “private property sir! you have no right here Sir! ― Does not this lead to the Hotel? ― No! Sir ― nothing of the kind!” ―― I thought of G. Kokali, & his ― “mi piacerebbe un dove sia più libertà.” ((I’d like [a place] where there is more freedom.)) ―

At dinner I was more cross. Φαγωμεν — φαγωμεν παραπολὺ — Διὰ τοῦτο εἶμαι βέβαιος. ((We ate ― we ate a lot ― For this I am sure (NB).))

Ἀλλὰ πῶς ἐμβορῶ νά ἀλλαλάξη τα πράγματα; ((But how can I change things? (NB).))

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Monday, 15 October 1860

Cedars ― 12th day.

Very depressing ― dark, wet day. ― Mr. Lyle says it is so delightful, because it enhances the fine days afterwards. I would rather have them now.

Letter from S. Markham, ― P. Williams & Gibson were there on last Tuesday ― & to Friday, the 12th ― when they left for Rome. ―

I went to Lyle’s at 9.30 & worked at the Cedars. But I was unwell & utterly oppressed by the dark gloom.

X6.

Yet I worked on: ― tho’ I really don’t know if I worked ill or well. ―

Later, they were putting up doors & hammering, distracteringly.

Lo ― at 3.30 came Mr. Hewitson, with Mr. Charles Empson!! ― see page 30 April.

At 5.30 came away ―

Wrote a longish letter to Mrs. Empson. ―

Dinner: sate next little Raleigh ― who is very interesting in his way.

I couldn’t make up “my mind” to go into the reading room. So came ’pstairs, & wrote again.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Sunday, 14 October 1860

X5 ― Which is grievous: ― μὰ πῶς ((But how to (NB).)) regulate all things ― body ― mind ― soul? ――

Rose late 7. ― Breakfast 9. ― Letters from E.T., J.B. Edwards ― & W. Holman Hunt, the latter to say he would come by 1st train. But he didn’t, so I thought he had gone to church at Walton. So I sate & talked to Messrs. Cruise, ― Reid, & Cooper.

At 12.30 W.H.H. turned up ― kind fellow: he had missed the train ― 9.20 ― & waited an hour at the Vauxhall station ― & then came on to Hampton Court, where he had walked. ― After he had lunched, we went to Lyles ― & the Cedars, & he gave me lots of help with the picture. Then we went to Hewitson’s ― & afterwards, walked up to St. George’s Hill ― very fine long flat views.

Back by 6. (Discourse of Mrs. [Hudet],) ― & her queer ways. No doubt, daddy is wonderfully good.)

Dinner far from unpleasant, ――― & at 8.20 Daddy went off.

He is, as he ever is, ― quite unselfish to come so far for me. ―

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 13 October 1860

Cedars. Day 11

Warmer, thank God. Cloudy & damp ― but here, damp is no great evil, being as we be on gravel. ― Breakfast ― no letters.

Better health, & went more cheerfully to work ― working from 9.30 to 5 exactly ― hardly ever looking off. ― The Elder, the Lyle, usually sitting beside me; ― he reminds me of C. Hullmandel often. (In today’s paper is the marriage of Lady E. Stanley & P.W. Talbot. ― I wonder how they at the Cottage have cared for this: at Littlegreen happily there are enough to think of as home. ― No Hornby’s name pollutes the august ceremony.) The Cedar picture goes on blindly: ― I must complete it now anyhow.

Returned by 6. 6.30 the Table d’hôte ―: sate between Messrs. Reid & Lee ― the latter a cousin of Brant’s of Damascus ― & more or less a man of “observations.” ― The “waiking virgin” opposite.

A very nice letter from Ann.

Came up before 9. No Holman Hunt ― but on the whole I believe I am doing right to stop here.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 12 October 1860

Cedars 10th day.

Rose at 6 but it was dreadfully cold. Nevertheless, worked at the Musters Philœ, & wrote notes to Miss S. Markham, R. & Mrs. Bright, &, after breakfast, to S.W. Clowes. ―

Horrible cold! ― I think, at times, that I must go at once. But I didn’t ― au contraire, I went to the Cedars, ― [(]10th day) & spite of gutsache & freezing, ― worked hard from 10 to 5. ― Whether for ill or good ― πόιος ἐξεύρει; ((Who knows? (NB).))

Returned ― half frozen at 5.30 ― & walked a bit, till 6.

At dinner, was horridly bored ― but by degrees, got a little warmer. The Raleigh brothers are nice lads. ―

Letter from C. Fortescue. ― πάντοτε ὸ ίδιος ― ἥγουν, καλὸς. ((Always the same ― good, that is (NB).))

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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