Monthly Archives: June 2009

Thursday, 23 June 1859

Bad night. ― Rose very late. Fine, but windy. The air here is more pleasant to me that that of Wellow, or Wells ― or Littlegreen. ― After breakfast & newspaper, ― read a good bit of the Petra journals to J.E.C. ― Lunch. ― & afterwards, went with him, in Dogcart through Sir R. Sheffield’s Park to Barton, where was Mr. Sheffield, the Rural Dean ―.― Then, we walked by what they call the Cliff ― a range of Down ― [road] sumptuously overlooking the Trent & Ouse, & Humber, finer river scenery it is impossible to see.

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a full[-]fed river ― & other scenes ― very delightful & glorious. Also there were young partridges, νέα ἀρνίθια. We went on to Alkborough, a village, where J. visited a sick clergyman: & then we walked back to Barton ― & drove all the way back again ― by 6½. ― We all 3 walked about till 7. ― Dinner, Roland & Edward Winn: ― & afterwards, ― Mrs. R.W. ― very nice & pleasant. ― It is curious to hear of Woolly, & the Wentworths. Saying a good deal. ― ― Bed at 11.30.

X14

James H. & a friend went to Denmark. In all the stationary shops “Bog=paper” was written up ― to the great shock of their [sentiments].

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Wednesday, 22 June 1859

Slept wonderfully well. ― Fine ― & grand clouds. ― Rose at 8. After breakfast ― & toddling about ― wrote several letters. ― & then came one from S.W.C. very nice & kind. Then walked with J.C. to the schools ― & to Mr. Winn’s: very nice people apparently. Map of Lincolnshire ― walk in grounds &c. ― Mrs. J.C. gone out for the day. ― J. & I lunch. Afterwards ― 1.30 ― returned to walk. Meadows ― flat ― canal ― river ― flat, & then up the Wolds, which I call Moab mountains. Wonderfully pretty village, ‘Saxby’ in trees &c. View from top. The Humber. Broad distances ―: walk across wolds; pine avenue exquisite green field, & white sheep with trees & villages & plain & vast ruin certainly one of the very grandest river views I know. ―

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Returned to the level, & walked by canal. Canal [Treksk ] boat ― cut thro’ fields. Tumble into ditch of black mud. Home by 6½, having greatly enjoyed the walk. ― J.E.C. is always the same.

The Winns were here at our return. ―

Dined at 7½ ― but John had been called away to a remote christening, so only Pussy & I were there ― but he came in at 8.30. ― Evening short ― we looked over Roberts’ Holy Land. ―

XX13

A: … went to a new living & was not aware that the Squire was waited for. “When the wicked man―” began he ― “ye munna go on ―” rose up & spoke the clerk. ― “he hath na come yet! ―”

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 21 June 1859

Slept ill, woke at sunrise, & beholding the clear sky & red tiles & chimney=pots, ―― thought of Southern places in spite of myself. ―

Rose at 7 ― breakfast at 7½ ― in Hansen’s lower room ―: Mrs. H. very fat: ― little Rose a nice child.

At 8 ― cab ― (which the horse “came to grief” at Tottenham Court road ― & I had to get another,) to King’s Cross. Train at 9.20. ― Very pleasant & quick to Peterborough. ― Thence slower. Boston & Louth Churches, & great beauty of endless plains of cultivation. At Ulceby by 3 ― after much pleasure in the going: & by 4 to Brigg, where a servant & Dogcart met me. Down to Appleby ― most quiet village & picturesque. John & E. Cross ― & their home ― all very nice & [sound] ― & beautiful. Walk with J.C. & afterwards with both. Dinner: a very happy evening ― till late ― say 11.

Any snipes here? ― (Tourist’s query.)
Lashins on ’em, your honor! ― (Irish lad.
Any ducks? ―――――
The lake is paved with ’em!
Any barometers?
I best had ― thirty ―― & then mysteriously ―
“Whiles: at night!”

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Monday, 20 June 1859

Gray ― dull. Rose at 5. ―

At 6 ― left good kind C.M.C. ― & came to rail, whence, by Glastonbury & Bristol, I reached London at 11½, & drove to Hansen’s. No room there ― but for the night. Note from J. Cross ― so I resolve to go to that warm[-]hearted fellow. Went to Dickenson ― out ― to R. Academy, where I saw the Crakes ― & then to Jones’ & Macbeans & C. Fortescue & back to Dickenson’s, where I found the cases unpacked: frames & glass broken ― pictures scarcely touched ― by gt. Good luck. Walked to Temple in pouring rain, but F.L. was out. Back ― & to Mayall’s, ― seeing Mr. Mulock ― about Photography. Then to Beadon’s ― & to Seymour St. by 5. ―

I have been “packing” now, & am pretty tired.

At 8 called on Clowes ― out. ―

Then dined with C.F. at the Blueposts ― pleasant in some senses. C.F. himself is ever the same warm heart.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Sunday, 19 June 1859

X12 / No end of dismals! ――

Rose late. ―― Letter from Ann ― enclosing a little note from Fred.k ˇ[Lear] acknowledging receipt of 10£. ― also she says Harriett is worse; but I do not see, as yet, that she is much more so than last year.

No letter from J.E.C. ― but, on the whole, considering the uncertainty of the picture=affairs, ― &c. ― I resolve to go to town tomorrow.

So I remain at home. (Trinity Sunday!) & pack up. At 2 C.M.C. returns ― [gr.]! ― ― & at 3 I went to the Cathedral. ― ― There preached Dr. Tuffnell, Bp of Brisbane! ― a very good & Apostolic sermon ― but who can reflect without confusion & regret that so apparently good a man is going to a Govt with such a Govr!

Returned at 4½ & dined with C.M.C. I am now going out to walk. C.C. is gone to his other duty.

Walked alone to the top of the Dulcot Hill ― grey calm beautiful ― but strangely dull. ―

Returned at 9 ― 9.30 ― & after talk with C.M.C. ― went to bed.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 18 June 1859

Same fine weather.

Letter from F.L. which I answered.

& from [Chinnery] ―: boxes arrived, but damage down the frames & perhaps pictures. ― I write off to Foord. No letter from J. Cross: ― & I nearly resolve to go to town on Monday. ―

Morning passed ――― nohow. ―

After lunch, C.M.C. & I walked up to the top of Dulcot Hill. (The Bp’s Gardens.) very beautiful. Back & dressed ― & to Mrs. Bells, a most bitterly awful bore! ― That Miss Bell next me very nearly made me leave the table, so atrociously did she gabble gabble. Could there be any more terrible punishment than being tied to that Miss Bell in the next world? Endless fire is a [fool] to it. ―

The male Bell, (tho’ his wife was really pleasing,) was a feeble being; & reminded me of Rosenstern’s dogma ―, “the world is not governed by wisdom ―” (or something of that sort) ―― he being a judge.

[gr.]

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 17 June 1859

Lovely morning, ― yet I could not rise early.

Breakfast, & afterwards, wrote to Mr. Howard, Mr. Clive & others, till C.M.C. came in. Then with him, went to the Cathedral, & to Mr. Pindus’s: ― & to reading room.

Lunch ― {qu: dinner?) one Smart, formerly a pupil at Carey’s ― now a clergyman here, minor canon. Odd enough, the talk of [Haighton], Martineau, Lockyer, & others. ― ― ― Read ― wrote ― & walked with C.M.C. to be photographed: ― read Times. ― ˇ[Bishop’s Gardens]
At 5.40 in Fly to Wookey ― Mr. Stewart’s. Very nice people. Dr. & Mrs. Storer, & 2 daughters ― a Miss Franklin &c.

One Dr. & Mrs. Ward: ― as talked.

More useless bored ―.―

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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