Monthly Archives: March 2009

Thursday, 24 March 1859

Rose before 8 ― dreary work.

Greek lesson ― before which [Dessonlany] came ― he seems scarcely older, & his attention & energy about Landscape art, are curious & good.

Worked at Lord Clermont’s Jerusalem, & (I suppose) finished it. But during the day came letters from S.W.C. & F.L. & I wrote to F.L. & Lady V. Sandars.

No one came & at 5 I called on the Knights. Isabella sad enough. ― on to Macbeans ― & the Marshalls ― Mrs. M. unsatisfactory.

Returned to dine: read & wrote.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Wednesday, 23 March 1859

Sad day to relate again. Slept well ― (rarely now ―) but late. Worked a little at B.H.H.’s Jerusalem. ― prepared for people ― but no people came.

Dawdled ― having put aside my work ― ― & looked out of window, watching ξενους, οἱ οποῖοι ἀναχώρισαν ((“Strangers, who departed.”)) ― with leggero ((“A slight.”)) [Πολὸ]. ― Resolved to go out & draw, but clouds [aris], & rain fell. Two Miss Boyles came, (nice girls rather.) & Lehman the Painter. ―

After that ― slept & (X9) ― & woke at 4. Then came Stansfeld, ―― who wants a picture & a drawing. Walked with him along the ruins ― ― good fellow. ― Returned & dined ― & wrote Greek. ―

X10

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Tuesday, 22 March 1859

Rose at 7 ― no early days now. Greek lesson.

Finished Lady W.’s Jerusalem ― the 2nd of the 6 incubi  ― yet not altogether as I wish it. ―

Letters from B. Hunt ― alas! not coming: ― all 3 of the Hopers ― Mrs. Mabbot, ― Freeman Thomas & Sir H.J. Shiffner are dead. He enclosed a [Blank] for signature relating to John Watherston, wh. I unwillingly answered & signed & sent off. ― Wrote also to Ann: ― & to F.L. Letters from the 2 Shakespeares, & also from J. Hutchinson. At 3½ walked with P.W. ― but he never walks far now, & returns soon. (From 2 to 3½ ― I had called on Lady Carmichael, & the Brights.) ― After returning, called on the Woodwards. At 7 to the Chetwodes, who are truly kind & cheerful people, tho’ I am unhappy in their dining room. ― Evening party ― Trotman, CodringtonHibbert, Eatons ― (very nice people ―)  Dr. & Mrs. ChambersWilson ― (of Lambeth,) & the Maharajah  Dhuleep Singh ― all [φορεμα] & [Ἐνδύματα]. ―

Came away at 11½. ―

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Monday, 21 March 1859

A most distressing day ― fine without ― dreary blank within. Vague & ill. Yet completed Lady W.’s Masada at last. ― but that was all the work I did. Letter from Ann. ― Majr Reynolds & Miss Yates came  ― & C. Perkins. ―

Afternoon dire & dismal. (X8). ― At 5 or 6 ― walked alone by the Ruin. Dined alone. ―― wrote Greek.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Sunday, 20 March 1859

Settled fine again. ― Wrote to F.L. ― Thankless work enough. ―

G.’s lesson, ― wh., humble as they are, are in their way, real.

Church, ― waiting for an hour: ― all disagreable ― W.’s sermon so too. ὁ Χριστὸς ὠμίλησε ποτέ τοῦ [], ((“Christ never spoke…” then an indecipherable word.)) ― whatever they may torture his words to. ― Returned ― & to Brights, & then with B. & Sir J. Duckworth, walked to Tor di Schiavi, ((“È un tempio prostilo con cella rotonda, al quale si dà il nome di Tor de’ Schiavi. Sembra che sia stato una specie di tempio e mausoleo insieme, destinato a ricevere i corpi della famiglia imperiale, a cui apparteneva la villa.” Nibby, Antonio. Itinerario di Roma e delle sue vicinanze. Roma: Tipografia Aurelj, 1830, vol. 1, 202.)) & the needless Alexandrine ((“Per la via Labicana dopo un miglio e mezzo veggonsi  a destra gli avanzi di un antico acquedotto che per la sua costruzione e direzione, conviene riconoscere per quello dell’acqua Alessandrina.” Ibid., 200.)) & back by the Frascati road. Most glorious & lovely was that Campagna ―1859-03-20 wh. is assuredly one of the most beautiful things in this world. ― Home by 6½. ― Dined at the Brights, the Duckworths, & Tremayne coming afterwards. I drew scratches, & was vexed at their being taken so much notice of: ― this kind of life is degrading I fear ― & impossible of good. Returning, at 11, or later, what clouds of memories come before me: ― F.L.’s silence is sad & worrying, for I don’t know why it exists ― or, in my case, why a line could not be written. I am resolving to send off Lady W.’s pictures this week.

XX7

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Saturday, 19 March 1859

Quite fine again. ― Worked at Lord Clermont’s Jerusalem. Some 18 or 20 ― “Ἄραβοι” ― came at 12 ― the only decent lot being the Rosses of Bladensburgh. ― Worked again to 3 ― then walked with P.W. to 5. ― Called on [Dessonlany], whose pictures are undoubtedly the nearest to Italian character of a [true complexion] & general appearance than any one’s. ――

At 7 ― dined at the Dss of St Albans’ ― Col & Mrs. Astley the only strangers: ― Evening not unpleasant, but I don’t like swells; though these are very kind good swells. ― Bored rather.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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Friday, 18 March 1859

Fine morning ― afternoon cloudy ― evening wet.

Greek lesson ― ― but worried by notes and interruptions.

At 12
Duke &
Dss of St Albans

Major ― &
Mrs. Gubbins.
Mr. &
Mrs. Tremayne.
Miss Alexander
Miss C[a]nning.
Mr.
Mrs.
Miss Bright

came ― & staid till 2. ― miserable bore of idleness ― yet, come si puo fare? ((“What can be done?”)) ― Worked at Lord Clermont’s Jerusalem ― but wearied & vexed.

At 5½ or 6 ― to P. Williams’, but he was going out to dine with the P. of Wales. ―

Dined at W. Sandbach’s ― 2 Dutch Gentlemen, & Mjr. Mansfield there ― wh. last I last met at Harry Lushington’s ― when, A.D.C. to Sir C. Campbell he & they all dined there. I like him better than other Mansfields ― but there is still a sort of persiflage. The “hazy manner” of the S. de R.’s ― is a good term of his. ― There were 2 anecdotes worth recording ― 1 ― ((Lear left space for the anecdote, but never wrote it down.))

2d ― The Emp. of R. meeting Grisi & her children says ― ― these then are little Grisettes?” ― “No sire, ― they are Marionettes.” ―

AN EXTREMELY PLEASANT EVENING. ―

BUT I WISH F.L. ― & ANN COULD WRITE.

[Transcribed by Marco Graziosi from Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Eng. 797.3.]

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